Author Topic: Favourite poems, previously Aubades  (Read 12518 times)

Offline Bubbles

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Favourite poems, previously Aubades
« on: April 10, 2007, 06:57:54 PM »
Someone mentioned aubades, which I'd not heard of, and I looked it up and found this one by Sylvia Plath, April Aubade, I think it's wonderful.


http://www.angelfire.com/tn/plath/april.html

(Ok folks, I'm sorry if this first message looks strange, it's actually one I wrote after the last one below.  I wanted to amend the Aubade thread to a Favourite Poetry thread, and messed around with the 'modify' button on here, and ended up losing all the intial info I'd put on my first post, so I've re-written an approximation of it, but as for word perfect, sorry, I lost the d...med thing!)

Must get more techified!

Bubbles.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2007, 08:13:32 PM by Bubbles »

Offline Amie

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Re: Aubades
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2007, 04:35:23 AM »
I hadn't come across this one before Bubbles, thanks for posting it.

And I don't think you're off topic at all, this forum is meant to include general discussion on poetry.  I'd sort of thought it would be nice to have a thread where people post links to their favourite poems (not paste them in, as there could be copyright issues, just provide links if they're already on the web).  Perhaps this one could be it?
"You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet." - Kafka

Offline Bubbles

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Re: Aubades
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2007, 05:21:15 AM »
Now then, I think that's a great idea Saturnine, a favourite poem thread.  For everyone out there, Saturnine suggested a few poets to me in a pm when we were discussing other matters, and I was amazed at how much I liked the work.  She'd noticed that I wrote some of my work in a style vaguely akin to one (though not fit to sit at their feet, of course) but it was true, she'd known work I didn't, so yes, this would be a great idea. 
There's just one problem with this.  I will end up spending all my waking hours on poetry, and my guess is the thread would quickly mushroom into a style/content/whatever else discussion, which is great, but I think I'll just bring the microwave and kettle into this room, just in case I can't leave it.  Hmm, will I or won't I buy a tastefully disguised commode????          :D :D ;)

Offline Amie

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Re: Aubades
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2007, 05:37:01 AM »
There's just one problem with this.  I will end up spending all my waking hours on poetry, and my guess is the thread would quickly mushroom into a style/content/whatever else discussion, which is great, but I think I'll just bring the microwave and kettle into this room, just in case I can't leave it.  Hmm, will I or won't I buy a tastefully disguised commode????          :D :D ;)

lol  ;D

Okay, here's my contribution for today:  Persimmons by Li-Young Lee.

Anyone else?  (feel free to comment on any poems that get posted of course! but remember to post only links and not full poems)
"You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet." - Kafka

Offline Bubbles

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Now Fav Poem, was Aubades.
« Reply #4 on: April 12, 2007, 07:56:53 PM »
Hi Everyone,
As you can see, I started this thread off on the subject of aubades, which then led onto suggestions about favourite poems.  Sat was the first one to post her 'Persimmon' suggestion.

I've now modified the title of this thread to Favourite Poems (was Aubades)

Saturnine, ... 'Persimmons' ... I've not read anything like that before and it took me a while to see the beauty of it.  At the beginning I felt it was prose, but by the end I was entranced.  Such imagery and poignancy.  It especially appealed to me as I'm an artist, too, and to lose one's sight, horrible.  I am sure there are many more messages to be read into this poem, and I'll read it again and let you know how many I find.  But, at first reading, lovely, and so different to what I have read.

Here's one of mine, I guess most people will know this well, but it remains one of my favourites.  Next time I'll try to find something less well known, but for now, I just love this one.

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot. 


http://www.io.com/~maus/poetry/prufrock.html

Offline Bubbles

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Re: Favourite poems, previously Aubades
« Reply #5 on: April 14, 2007, 07:42:24 PM »
OOOOOOOO, what happened to this thread?  I'm hoping someone else will post a fav poem, come on folks, don't be shy! ;)

Offline Amie

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Re: Now Fav Poem, was Aubades.
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2007, 02:51:22 PM »
The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot. 

Very much worth re-reading, thanks for posting it Bubbles.

No one else want to post some favourite poems?

I'll have another go:  Bog Queen (Seamus Heaney)

(that was tough!  about the first ten poems I tried don't appear to be posted anywhere on the internet!)
"You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet." - Kafka

Leigh

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Re: Favourite poems, previously Aubades
« Reply #7 on: April 18, 2007, 05:56:15 PM »
Okay, I hope I do this right, since I've never posted a link before:

It's an old favorite by Robert Frost. I have many favorites of his, but had to pick just one for this thread. It's called 'Mending Wall', at:

http://www.english.upenn.edu/~afilreis/88/frost-mending.html

I tried to find a url that contained just that one poem; I think it's from Penn State, which I'm not affiliated with in any form.

It's just simply a gorgeous poem, and when you catch the subtext, it's very pertinent. :)

Leigh x

Offline Bubbles

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Re: Favourite poems, previously Aubades
« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2007, 06:18:37 PM »
Ooooh, I remember that one, learned it off by heart for my GCSE's, 2000 years ago.

Lovely.  OK, now I'm worried just putting that word down, and feel I should crit everything that passes my nose, but I'm tired now, so can I just leave it at this?
Beautiful images, country understanding from a countryman, slow speech feel, a little surliness.  (And memories of being 16 or 17 and cramming poetry on a hot beach with mates, drinking Fanta and eyeing up the boys!  SIGH.)

Bubbs.

Leigh

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Re: Favourite poems, previously Aubades
« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2007, 06:22:51 PM »
 :D ;D

That's cute, Bubbs... I'm glad it has added magic for you! I knew it was an oldie, but still a goodie. Next one I post will be more current. I just can't decide which to choose! :D  But the thread did say 'favorite poems', and I can assume that means a 'like an old shoe' one, too! ;D heh

Leigh x

ps, anybody else have some, too??

pps, Bubbles, I didn't think we had to crit on these 'fave poems' , do we? Just simply share and enjoy them? :)
« Last Edit: April 18, 2007, 06:27:09 PM by Leigh »

Offline Bubbles

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Re: Favourite poems, previously Aubades
« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2007, 08:04:16 PM »
True, Leigh, it's just that I find myself reading Weetabix packets now, and thinking,
     'Hmm, rubbish use of words there, and do they need all those adjectives?'

lolol.

Bubbs.

Leigh

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Re: Favourite poems, previously Aubades
« Reply #11 on: April 19, 2007, 03:19:25 PM »
Here's a good one by Yusef Komunyakaa:

'Blackberries', at    http://www.ibiblio.org/ipa/poems/komunyakaa/blackberries.php   


He has many other great ones, also.  :)

L

Offline Amie

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Re: Favourite poems, previously Aubades
« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2007, 10:31:18 AM »
That is absolutely gorgeous Leigh, thanks for posting it :)

I really wanted to post Pacific Lament by Charles Olsen, but I can't find it anywhere on the net.

I found this one rather haunting:  A Fantasy (Louise Gluck)

"You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet." - Kafka

Leigh

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Re: Favourite poems, previously Aubades
« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2007, 07:24:08 PM »
That is lovely and sad, Sat! I've never read it. Also, love Seamus Heaney, 'Bog Queen' is exquisite.

Please post 'Pacific Lament' if you find it! I looked for it, but also no luck. :(

Leigh

ps edit: I found the poem, it is stunning. Gorgeous, moving, brings tears. I love it. It's on a personal blog, though... do we post a link like that?? Or only legit sites?  -L
« Last Edit: April 21, 2007, 09:16:16 PM by Leigh »

Offline Amie

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Re: Favourite poems, previously Aubades
« Reply #14 on: May 15, 2007, 11:26:28 AM »
I missed this before Leigh - does anyone know if it's okay to post a link to a blog?  If so, please do Leigh, I love that poem.

I wanted to bump this, following all the recent talk about critting.  I think one really important thing in developing your critting skills is to read a lot of poetry (I'd say particularly contemporary poetry, as we're writing in the contemporary world, but a bit of everything helps to give balance).  If it's not immediately evident why, it's because 1) you develop a sense of what you do and don't like in poetry, the more you see of it;  2) if you look at critically acclaimed works, and can't figure out why others like it immediately and so dig deeper - once you learn why, it may give you something new to appreciate in poetry that you hadn't noticed before - if nothing else, it gives you context (as in, "that was considered innovative and exciting back when and I can see why others like it, but it still isn't really for me"); 3) how can you tell what's fresh and innovative, if you don't know what's been done before?  (and anyway, totally apart from critting, it's one of the great pleasures in life, so I'd assume that most people who aspire to write poetry also like to read poetry?   ???)

Anyway, I also thought it might be useful if, when posting, the poster explains why they like something.  I couldn't find this in print anywhere on the web, but I think there's an audio link here:  Practical Concerns, William J. Harris.  If you can't make it work (I couldn't) PM me and I'll send you the text.  The thing I like about this one (and which probably goes totally contrary to trying to get people to give informed critique on a poetry workshop ;) ) is how it's so surreal, and yet the message is so clear - what do technicalities matter, if you make something beautiful that affects people profoundly?
« Last Edit: May 15, 2007, 11:29:37 AM by Saturnine »
"You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet." - Kafka