Author Topic: How to write Fiction -- Recommended Reading Resources  (Read 16191 times)

Offline Allie

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Re: How to write Fiction -- Recommended Reading Resources
« Reply #15 on: March 18, 2007, 02:46:11 PM »
Following on my post earlier, about the names' books, I looked up Allie again in The Baby Name Survey Book. Apparently it suggests a tomboy (true, even at my age) and says she's possibly a yo-yo or marbles champ. Now how could they have known that I love the yo-yo (thought I'm not very good at it) and have a huge collection of marbles? The references are to Ali MacGraw of Love Story, Ally Sheedy from Breakfast Club (don't know that one), the boxer Muhammad Ali, the story of Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, and TV shows Kate and Allie and Ally McBeal.

BTW, I forgot to say earlier that the book is by Bruce Lansky & Barry Sinrod.

Lynn10240

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Re: How to write Fiction -- Recommended Reading Resources
« Reply #16 on: March 18, 2007, 04:07:13 PM »
I've read lots of informative and helpful writing books, but cannot recall all the titles and authors.

A favorite of mine is simply Fiction by Michael Seidman. This reads as if you were chatting comfortably with an editor as he explains to you, openly, how to write that idea and then discusses elements of publishing and the industry.

If you're serious about fiction, reading Fiction actually feels like a writing opportunity.

Offline Allie

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Re: How to write Fiction -- Recommended Reading Resources
« Reply #17 on: March 19, 2007, 06:20:08 AM »
Three books I've found excellent for step-by-step guidance are:

The Weekend Novelist, by Robert J Ray (I have the older version, but it has recently been reissued).

There's also a version of this for crime novelists called, The Weekend Novelist Writes A Mystery, by the same author with Jack Remick.

Novel Writing: 16 Steps To Success, by Evan Marshall. I think I've seen this under another name (something like, The Marshall Plan for Writing Success)

But the book I found most inspiring when I first started novel writing was a slim volume called One Way To Write Your Novel: A step-by-step method for putting your unwritten novel on the road to publication, by Dick Perry, 1983. It's a Writer's Digest book, although not one of the better known ones. If it's not still on their list, you will probably be able to get it as a used book from Amazon or Abe Books. It really simplifies the whole process for you. Just to give you a taste of what it contains, the chapter headings are:

 1  Watch That First Step - It's a Big One

 2  How to Write a Novel in 100 Days

 3  Creating an Unforgettable Character

 4  It Takes Two to Dialogue

  5  Where Does Your Novel Happen?

 6   Description in Small Doses

 7  Four Ways to Put Pizzazz in Your Novel

 8  Is Sex Necessary?

 9  Everyone Laughed When I Sat Down at the Typewriter [That's how old it is, before computers were common]

10 Having Something to Say - and Letting Your Characters Say It

11 The Way It Was - Exactly

12 Plotting: First, Last, and Middle Chapters

13 Your Plotting Notebook for a Novel

14 First, But Hardly Final Draft

15 The Second Draft - Chapter by Chapter

16 Ouch! The Art of Self-Editing

17 Your Finished Novel - Where to Send It


Offline bookclover

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Re: How to write Fiction -- Recommended Reading Resources
« Reply #18 on: June 29, 2007, 09:48:45 AM »
The book I always suggest is 'on writing' by s. king. I am not a fan of his books but this one was extremely useful for me as a writer.

Offline Gayle

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Re: How to write Fiction -- Recommended Reading Resources
« Reply #19 on: August 22, 2007, 08:42:57 PM »
There's a little gem of a book floating around out there called The 3 A.M. Epiphany: Uncommon Writing Excercises that Transform Your Fiction by Brian Kiteley. He's a professor the University of Denver which is one of the few universities that offers a Ph.D. in creative writing. The book has 201 writing exercises that help you build your basic skills. I found this book about a month ago and I absolutely love it. Its ISBN is 1-58297-351-2 (just in case you want to track it down).