Author Topic: More of the book. BEWARE!!!.....It's pretty long  (Read 604 times)

Offline Sasha6

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More of the book. BEWARE!!!.....It's pretty long
« on: February 23, 2007, 08:32:41 PM »
Okay, I've finally got "Justine" and have been reading it. I've gotten a lot of good ideas for my book so here's another part that I've just thought up. Oh, and the whole thing about her name, I've finally been able to develope more of her character and picked out a name for her. If any of you have read "Justine" then you'll understand the parellel. If not, it's still a fun read! Tell me what you think! ;)



  Over the next month of acting as a maid to the Marquis, he didn't say much. Her excitment had faded to a mundane exceptence of her life at the present. She constantly dusted the empty tops of drawers and folded the disgarded clothes strewn to the four corners of the room. Therese had heard that creative men were messy and was expecting to find something a bit more exciting then trousers and stockings.
  The Marquis' minute room was a major contrast to the lavish flat just across the hall. It was plain, wood paneled type of room that would be found in an inn. A modest bed, with strips of leather tied to wooden posts creating a kind of latice work to hold a straw filled matress, protruded from one wall with a fairly large window faceing towards the street. In the corner, close to the bed, stood a large wardrobe. Against the wall, perpendicular to the one with the window, sat a crude wooden desk and an equally course chair. Paper, ink pots and quills clutered the top of the desk. Part of the room was sectioned off by a sheet and behind it was a toilette. A squat set of drawers lined another wall and the only other adornment of the room was a thread-bare rug and two thin cushioned chairs.
   On day as Therese went about tidying the room the Marquis walked through the door, letting in a cool draft from the hallway, and flung his cloak on the newly made bed. Therese curtsied and went on dusting. The Marquis just stood and watched in silence rather then sitting at his desk as usual. His arms were folded and his eyebrows drawn.
  An awkward feeling filled the room as the silence stretched over a minute. Finally, Therese couldn't take it any longer. She turned towards him and boldly looked him in the eye.
  "Does something displease you?" she asked in a slight sarcastic tone.
  He was silent a couple more seconds before replieing, "Yes, actually something does." Then fell quiet again.
  She regarded him expectantly, "And it is...?"
  "After I had caught you in my room and confronted Monsieur Boucher concerning his interest in my property, he made a remake in refrence to an event in your history. Would you be so kind as to enlighten the subject for me."
  Therese gapped at him. He can not be serious, she thought. "I'm afraid monsieur that certain events in my past might bore you."
  He waved a hand and strode to one of the cushioned chairs, "No please. Tell me." He sat and motioned for her to sit across from him.
  This had been the most he had ever said to her and he had never asked her anything. Hesitantly, she sat down, the feather duster still in her hand.
  "Well monsieur, to disclose what I'm about to tell you, some history needs to be explained."
  He nodded encouragingly. Therese took a large breath and went on, "My mother is a lady her worked her way to riches, or at least a steady income. She started out as a whore. Not to say that she is a disgraceful woman," she added hurridly, "but she would become a mistress to a wealthy man and once he had moved on she would move on as well. The last man she was with got her with child. I was the product. But instead of careing for us, like he promised, he through my mother out and left her to her own devices. Being well off from her affairs we were easily set up in a flat of our own where I've grown up all my life."
  She paused her to examine the Marquis' expression. He nodded his head and waved his hand for her to continue.
  "My mother tried to keep me as protected and innocent as possible. But I had grown up headstrong and her gaurdenship smothered and angered me. So I left home to taste the satisfaction of being my own person. This was only a couple of years ago. I found a wealthy marquise and became her a chamber maid. The pay was good and I had a place to sleep and food to eat. This marquise had a nephew. I will not disclose they're names for fear that I might cause a conflict in some way. This nephew was a count and to inherit the marquise's money. I grew found of the count, not knowing his try nature, and even while he hardly acknowldeged my presence.
  "One night there was a knock at my door. When I answered I was surprised to see the count standing in the hallway. He asked to come in and have a word with me. Of course, me being a naive girl and practically in love with him I agreed. At first he just blithered about nothing important and asked me about where I was from. After I had told him he became excedingly serious. 'Therese,' he said 'I have a wicked paln that I need your help to fulfill. If you truly love me, then you will help me.' I nearly melted. He knew that I loved him! Of course I would help him with anything. Then, he revealed his plain to me. He was requesting that I assist him in murdering his aunt. My heart fell. This man before me was in no way honorable. He did not care for me, he only wanted money. He promised to set me for the rest of my life if I helped, but I could not agree to something so evil.
  "He grew angry with me and left my room. A week went by. All seemed normal. I had not recieved any more nightly visits and the count was ignoring me as he had before. But, exactly a week to the night he had tried to enlist me in his evil plot, I woke to screaming. Hurridly, I ran to my mistress' bed chamber. She was convulsing on her bed and making the most horrifying noise I had ever heard. Within five minutes, my mistress was dead.
  "The count had run in and hastly sent someone to fetch the constable. As I knelt weeping at the side of the marquise, the count sneered down at me, 'So much for your honorable loyalty Therese. You'll see that no good deed is ever rewarded justly.' When the constable arrived I was promptly accused of poisoning the marquise and taken to jail.
  "I was sentenced to death almost right away. But, after only a few days in the cell with criminals that had done much fouler deed's then I had been accused of, my mother arrived and paid to have the whole mess forgotten. I was freed on the promise that I would never again leave home until I was properly wed. Then my mother set me with a position as a maid to the Boucher's. They knew about my past but were willing to take me on anyway."
   Therese ended her story with a shrug of her shoulders. She was now studing the pattern of the faded rug.
   "Well,"The Marquis finally said, "That is a story worth writing." He stood and walked to the desk. Sitting, he brought out a new piece of paper, dipped a quill in ink and started scribbling away. Therese stared at his back then stood to start dusting again. He said nothing for the rest of the night.
 
My significant other is myself, which is what happens when you suffer from self-obsession and multiple personalities.