Author Topic: Writing Class  (Read 3794 times)

Patx

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Re: Writing Class
« Reply #30 on: February 13, 2007, 12:25:58 PM »
Exactly!

I didn't make myself clear - but I agree with what your saying.

As you say, fundamentally, most tutors/lecturers/academics are not biased against the 'genres'. But, when you choose to write within a particular 'genre', what tutors are looking for is an awareness of the conventions of that genre. Sometimes, you may only be able to demonstrate this awareness through the accompanying critical essay. 

It's not always necessary, even if it is fashionable, to play with, or subvert those conventions but you must be a 'knowing' writer; a conscious writer.

I think there is an argument to be made for a 'high art' - 'low art' distinction. However, I accept that the genre does not have to define whether the work is high or low.

As you say, too many genre writers simply churn out facsimiles and the writing can be formulaic and unchallenging. It should say more only about them as writers but unfortunately, the genres get tarred with the same brush.

Good writers can produce art across the genre conventions and I think that if you demonstate your awareness of the 'rules' and characteristics of a genre you're halfway to work which transcends its genre.


« Last Edit: February 13, 2007, 12:29:18 PM by Patx »

Patron

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Re: Writing Class
« Reply #31 on: February 13, 2007, 01:53:16 PM »
I wouldn't waste my time on writing classes. You'll get far better feedback from a board like this one, than from a writing class unless you get an unusual teacher. By and large, the teacher of the class will have his or her own ideas of how writers should write and you'll fail if you don't follow them. But his way, and your style, may be very different. You could wind up damanging your style in such a case.


I agree Crystal. Also I would say that you will much more by writing on your own using the school of hard knocks. It's not a bad school. The lessons and impressions last forever and the beauty is that your writing is still 100% yours and not somebody elses influence.

Sincerely,

Patron

Patx

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Re: Writing Class
« Reply #32 on: February 13, 2007, 02:22:39 PM »
The school of hard knocks and the university of life have a lot going for them. The downside of both of those institutions though is that their courses tend to take a long time - sometimes open-ended!

And unfortunately, students can spend a lot of time re-inventing the wheel.

I don't think it's too different to anything else. Forty years ago, you wouldn't have been able to do a formal course in creative writing.

Forty years ago, there were no home computers.

But if a child wanted to learn about computers today, you wouldn't send them out to the garage with a screwdriver, a soldering-iron and a textbook on binary code!

You might be lucky. They might invent Windows - again!!

It's just progress. Society stands still when we don't learn, and when we don't adapt our systems of learning.

« Last Edit: February 14, 2007, 07:43:03 AM by Patx »