Author Topic: 'A' or 'AN'  (Read 9268 times)

Offline Symphony

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Re: 'A' or 'AN'
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2006, 06:23:44 AM »
I think I'd agree that pronunciation is the best course - certainly when it's in a piece of dialogue. Funnily enough, I was always taught 'an hotel' in school, too - though Lord knows why! But this is really interesting because I'm continually stumped by things like 'an RAF pilot'. The 'rules' would dictate that it should be 'a' before the consonant, but that would make it impossible to read, so we have to take the pronunciation of the 'r' rather than the physical aspect of it. Is that right?

Chillies - the words are going to change from region to region, aren't they? The best Irish novelists still don't know the difference between 'bring' and 'take' - I still agonise over that one!!! Not to mention things like 'I didn't used to/I usedn't to' - one's Irish (and probably incorrect) and the other's English - and don't ask me which is which because I've decided to avoid both and find another way around them!!  :D :D

Offline chillies

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Re: 'A' or 'AN'
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2006, 01:49:03 PM »
English certainly is a confusing language. I saw a documentary not long ago, which stated that before Henry viii created the Church of England, virtually every town in England had a different dialect. In fact at times a person from one town could not uderstand a person from a neighbouring town. When the Anglican faith started, the bible was allowed to be written in English  ( before this time it was only ever written in Latin). This was the start of a standardized form of English. It's just as well really, we could really have problems couldn't we? :D

Offline Symphony

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Re: 'A' or 'AN'
« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2006, 10:15:37 AM »
 :D