Author Topic: Getting inside a character's mind  (Read 12710 times)

crystalwizard

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2007, 01:16:04 PM »
It gives you a starting point for writing the character sketch. It's a lot eaiser to write one, once you have a solid idea of what the character is like.

thatollie

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2007, 01:19:19 PM »
I always start with a solid idea of what the character is like, because the plot and character are one and the same. This action results because the character makes it happen.

Patron

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2007, 06:23:46 PM »
Hi Smiley;

I thought you got some good answers from several people. I believe whole-heartedly in character profiles. If you read any interviews with many successful writers that share secrets about characters you will find that character backgrounds are extremely important.

Answering the questions that Crystal gave is only just a small portion of questions that you could answer for these characters. You need to get inside their heads and really get to know them like they have been people you have known for years. The reason is once you do this your writing is very simplified in that you know what how when and why the character is going to do, react and say.....as it's been said so many times; the characters write themselves. It saves you a lot of agony later.

My humble opinion,

Sincerely,

Patron

crystalwizard

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #18 on: January 26, 2007, 08:59:01 PM »
I always start with a solid idea of what the character is like, because the plot and character are one and the same. This action results because the character makes it happen.

But other people don't, thus the original question has a different answer for everyone.

crystalwizard

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #19 on: January 26, 2007, 09:08:21 PM »
the characters write themselves. It saves you a lot of agony later.

"If you invent two or three people and turn them loose in your manuscript, something is bound to happen to them -- you can't help it; and then it will take you the rest of the book to get them out of the natural consequences of that occurrence, and so first thing you know, there's your book all finished up and never cost you an idea." - Mark Twain

thatollie

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #20 on: January 27, 2007, 12:18:59 PM »
Creating characters and letting them run loose in your head may work for some people but not for me. You could find yourself getting stuck. I think asking them those "what do you look like?" "Who was your childhood hero?" questions can be a bit boring but come up with a couple of kick ass scenes and then thinking "but who would something like this?" That's what keeps me writing every day.

Offline Smiley

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 516
    • View Profile
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #21 on: January 27, 2007, 01:06:26 PM »
Thank you to all you lovely people for the fantastic advice, I have printed off this thread for future reference. I thought as a practice I would write several character studies using different methods & see which works best for me.

I'll post some for review to see what you think.

Thanks again guys

Smiley x  :)
Smiles make the world a happier place, share yours with a stranger it could make their day.

thatollie

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #22 on: January 27, 2007, 02:25:37 PM »
If you're going to post some pieces for comparing technique. I think you should put them all on the same thread and definately keep which piece is which a secret. I might try that myself as well.

Patx

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #23 on: January 27, 2007, 02:36:03 PM »
I find the most direct route is via a penetrating blow to the temporal bone - then insert the finger inside the skull and wiggle it about.

That's funny Ollie - there's nothing in yours.

thatollie

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #24 on: January 27, 2007, 02:38:39 PM »
That's because you haven't got the upper body strength to bash my skull in. Was that supposed to be a blow, seemed more like a gently massage.

Patx

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #25 on: January 27, 2007, 02:47:57 PM »
Do you think that might be due to the thickness of the bone?

crystalwizard

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #26 on: January 27, 2007, 02:53:10 PM »
I find the most direct route is via a penetrating blow to the temporal bone - then insert the finger inside the skull and wiggle it about.

Which would explain your problem.

Offline Smiley

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 516
    • View Profile
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #27 on: January 27, 2007, 02:57:11 PM »
Quote
I find the most direct route is via a penetrating blow to the temporal bone - then insert the finger inside the skull and wiggle it about.

That's funny Ollie - there's nothing in yours.


Quote
That's because you haven't got the upper body strength to bash my skull in. Was that supposed to be a blow, seemed more like a gently massage


Quote
Do you think that might be due to the thickness of the bone?


Now, now children, no need for insults ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D

Made me laugh though ;)

Smiley x  :)


Smiles make the world a happier place, share yours with a stranger it could make their day.

Patx

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #28 on: January 27, 2007, 02:59:00 PM »
My pleasure, ma'am.

thatollie

  • Guest
Re: Getting inside a character's mind
« Reply #29 on: January 27, 2007, 03:09:50 PM »
Mine as well.  8)