Author Topic: What is a "run-on" sentence?  (Read 200 times)

Offline heartsongjt

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  • A/K/A Jan (Sanford) Tetstone
What is a "run-on" sentence?
« on: March 18, 2019, 01:52:56 PM »
Avoid the "run-on" sentence.

Incorrect:
           Last night we saw a beautiful moth, in the morning it was gone.

Here we really have two sentences incorrectly written as one.

           Last night we saw a beautiful moth. In the morning it was gone.

This type of error shows up only in writing.

Some, who make this mistake, might not use any punctuation after the word  moth. Such a sentence is called a run-on sentence.  The incorrect use of a comma after the word moth is called the comma fault.

Another Example:

Incorrect:
Allow a lady to enter a room first it is a mark of courtesy.

This is the way the sentence should be written:
             
                   Allow a lady to enter a room first. It is a mark of courtesy.

Many writers spoil really good stories, by stringing their thoughts along on a thread of and's (and run-on sentences).
Words are Weapons of Demons and Saints