Author Topic: 7  (Read 7203 times)

Offline drab

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3896
Re: 7
« Reply #15 on: February 18, 2017, 10:45:30 PM »
requires
To live, with gentle but cunning deceit, and accept the consequences, is the destiny of every man.

Offline duck

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2921
  • The best laid plans of mice and men turn to ...
Re: 7
« Reply #16 on: February 19, 2017, 11:26:07 AM »
demands

Offline Mark T

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4097
Re: 7
« Reply #17 on: February 19, 2017, 04:34:07 PM »

seeking

Offline JamieDarke

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
Re: 7
« Reply #18 on: February 23, 2017, 04:41:25 AM »
Personally I wouldn't change "needing."

I would consider maybe finding a word to replace "gravitas."

I figure that maybe 5% of those of us who have read this piece will know the definition of "gravitas." 
Crying does not indicate that you are weak. Since birth, it has always been a sign that you are alive.” Charlotte Brontė, Jane Eyre

Offline Mark T

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4097
Re: 7
« Reply #19 on: February 23, 2017, 09:46:10 AM »

Did you know that 47.52% of all statistics are made up on the spot? How do you figure that only 5% will know the meaning of the word? Because you didn't? We are a community of writers, not doofi - and if someone has to look up a word, why, we say thanks for the addition to our vocabularies. To suggest that word choices should be exegetically based is just silly.   

Offline Lon Palmer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 715
  • Writing Doctor (contact by PM)
    • Lon Palmer's blog
Re: 7
« Reply #20 on: February 23, 2017, 09:49:13 AM »
I imagine that most of us know what "gravitas" means (a word that is frequently applied to actors, for instance). For anyone who doesn't, the shared root with "gravity" is a pretty clear clue. I don't see any problem with the word. And for the 5% - yes, I am making up that statistic on the spot - looking it up is good for them.

Offline JamieDarke

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
Re: 7
« Reply #21 on: February 23, 2017, 10:36:31 AM »
Did you know that 47.52% of all statistics are made up on the spot? How do you figure that only 5% will know the meaning of the word? Because you didn't? We are a community of writers, not doofi - and if someone has to look up a word, why, we say thanks for the addition to our vocabularies. To suggest that word choices should be exegetically based is just silly.   


Am I correct in thinking that you don't take too kindly to criticism?


Crying does not indicate that you are weak. Since birth, it has always been a sign that you are alive.” Charlotte Brontė, Jane Eyre

Offline Mark T

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4097
Re: 7
« Reply #22 on: February 23, 2017, 11:52:37 AM »

I'm here for the criticism - constructive and intelligent criticism.   

Offline Tom 10

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8850
Re: 7
« Reply #23 on: February 23, 2017, 12:18:47 PM »
I often think I am one of the doofi, and here I intend to share the data.  
I didn't take this as necessarily death.  There are plenty of other templates to meaning for this rugged little piece of cryticism. :)

Ahead,
a void
needing
gravitas
and thought.

First, there is the view that this author is writing about  . . . writing.  Has he written the piece into a corner?  Have the inspirational winds hit the doldrums?  Is it the occasion to rediscover the thread?   The poem could also be a coded instruction - if, for example, the space is removed from L.2, we would have . . . a directive.   It has otherwise been variously phrased as live for today, YOLO, and Don't think, Meat, it can only hurt the team."

Another plausible take is that the title refers to the seventh day- the last day of creation.  Following seven days of creation, what lies ahead for the Deity?  for us?  Perhaps some sense of a void following the completion of the divine agenda. 

There are other lines of thought which follow interpreting the poem in relation to the title - 7 - as in: we are on the verge of 8.  The number 8 is the number of the perfection, the infinity.   In mathematics the symbol of the infinity is represented by a 8 laid down.  8 is the symbol of the cosmic Christ.  8 is the number designating the immutable eternity or the self-destruction.  It represents also the final point of the manifestation.

In China, the 8 expresses the totality of the universe.  Number of the balance and of the cosmic order, according to the Egyptians.  Number expressing the matter, it is also the symbol of the incarnation in the matter which becomes itself creative and autonomous, governing its own laws.  

The number eight corresponds to the New Testament, according to Ambroise.   It is the symbol of the new Life, the final Resurrection and the anticipated Resurrection that is the baptism.  According to Clement of Alexandria, the Christ places under the sign of 8 the one he made to be born again.  

8 represents the the totality and the coherence of the creation in evolution.

In China, it expresses the totality of the universe.   The Pythagoreans have made the number 8 the symbol of the love and the friendship, the prudence and the thinking and they have called it the Great "Tetrachtys".  In Babylon, in Egypt and in Arabia, it was the number of the duplication devoted to the sun, from where the solar disc is decorated of a cross with eight arms.  The number 8 means the multiplicity, for the Japanese.

With these cosmic symbolic connotations, 7 puts the reader on the verge of infinity or something less [more].  

Death?  I didn't see it.

T
« Last Edit: February 23, 2017, 12:22:50 PM by Tom 10 »

Offline JamieDarke

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
Re: 7
« Reply #24 on: February 23, 2017, 12:34:44 PM »
I'm here for the criticism - constructive and intelligent criticism.   

Obviously meaning that you do not consider my replies as intelligent.

I really have no desire to engage in a bout of online fisticuffs with you ... However I must say that in other writing Boards I have frequented members, Hero or otherwise, with 3333 posts to their credit,  usually set an example and encourage newbies.

Perhaps I'm just old fashioned.

Crying does not indicate that you are weak. Since birth, it has always been a sign that you are alive.” Charlotte Brontė, Jane Eyre

Offline Tom 10

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 8850
Re: 7
« Reply #25 on: February 23, 2017, 01:05:37 PM »
Jamie - slow down.  Mark's not trying to pick a fight with you.  He is direct in his statements.  Don't read personal attacks into what he says.  Just take at face value.  We are all here for good feedback.  We try to give it and try to accept it.  Its not personal.

 :)
T

Offline JamieDarke

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
Re: 7
« Reply #26 on: February 23, 2017, 01:21:42 PM »
Jamie - slow down.  Mark's not trying to pick a fight with you.  He is direct in his statements.  Don't read personal attacks into what he says.  Just take at face value.  We are all here for good feedback.  We try to give it and try to accept it.  Its not personal.

 :)
T

Then I guess there's a pretty fine line between being direct, being insulting and not being personal.

In any event I accept what you have said in your post and appreciate you taking the time to enlighten me.

Thank you. 

Crying does not indicate that you are weak. Since birth, it has always been a sign that you are alive.” Charlotte Brontė, Jane Eyre

Offline Lon Palmer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 715
  • Writing Doctor (contact by PM)
    • Lon Palmer's blog
Re: 7
« Reply #27 on: February 23, 2017, 01:22:07 PM »
Quote
I really have no desire to engage in a bout of online fisticuffs with you ... However I must say that in other writing Boards I have frequented members, Hero or otherwise, with 3333 posts to their credit,  usually set an example and encourage newbies.

Perhaps I'm just old fashioned.


What boards have you been on? (rhetorical question)

I have been on several where I got hammered consistently (and sometimes mercilessly) for writing in traditional forms, sometimes using archaic language. I think that's one of the reasons that I haven't written a poem for ages now.

My posts here number in the hundreds rather than the thousands, but your reception, from some quarters, is the harshest I can recall seeing here. The traffic is down since my last round here - maybe there's some crankiness . . . but I speculate.

Can I offer a bit of advice? Post a poem of short to moderate length that you have put some considerable time into.

Also, when you reply to someone, place your response after the [/quote] or it's a little confusing.
« Last Edit: February 23, 2017, 01:23:42 PM by Lon Palmer »

Offline Lon Palmer

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 715
  • Writing Doctor (contact by PM)
    • Lon Palmer's blog
Re: 7
« Reply #28 on: February 23, 2017, 01:24:44 PM »
Interesting crit, Tom.

Offline JamieDarke

  • Jr. Member
  • **
  • Posts: 69
Re: 7
« Reply #29 on: February 23, 2017, 01:48:40 PM »

What boards have you been on? (rhetorical question)

I have been on several where I got hammered consistently (and sometimes mercilessly) for writing in traditional forms, sometimes using archaic language. I think that's one of the reasons that I haven't written a poem for ages now.

My posts here number in the hundreds rather than the thousands, but your reception, from some quarters, is the harshest I can recall seeing here. The traffic is down since my last round here - maybe there's some crankiness . . . but I speculate.

Can I offer a bit of advice? Post a poem of short to moderate length that you have put some considerable time into.

Also, when you reply to someone, place your response after the  or it's a little confusing.

Thank you for your response ... greatly appreciated.
Crying does not indicate that you are weak. Since birth, it has always been a sign that you are alive.” Charlotte Brontė, Jane Eyre