Author Topic: I'm not sure what just happened, but I think I got ripped off (Paid Editor)  (Read 10717 times)

Offline lamont cranston

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My friend called back to say he was not able to do a good job because of past trauma.  He gave me one criticism from the previous session, a new criticism, and said those are the only two valid criticisms/things I need to change.  He said I was not in need of much of any traditional copy editing.

hillwalker3000

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And you believed him? Based on his past efforts, his advice is probably worthless.

H3K

Offline lamont cranston

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And you believed him? Based on his past efforts, his advice is probably worthless.

H3K

Who said anything about believing him?  I certainly didn't.  


I do believe that I'm not in much need of 'garden variety copy editing'.  Several people now have read the whole thing for proof reading(one, my husband is a very good proof reader, or at least he so claims), and in 500 pages(at least it's 500 pages the way I have it formatted, I don't think it will be when actually printed or epub'd), have not found more than a few typos or other similar errors.
« Last Edit: March 03, 2017, 09:05:02 PM by lamont cranston »

Offline lamont cranston

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One of the things I've done to clean up typos and mis-wordings is read it aloud over and over.  Yeah.  The whole thing. 

Lin

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I saw you told us earlier this was a' LONG BOOK.'  Is this your first novel?  If so, watch out for word count. Publishers are rather strict about first novels and the number of words.  Just thought I would mention it.

Lin

Offline lamont cranston

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What word count should I have then?


Artemis Quark

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You might find this article useful as a guide.

http://www.writersdigest.com/editor-blogs/guide-to-literary-agents/word-count-for-novels-and-childrens-books-the-definitive-post

In short:
80,000 89,999:       Totally cool
90,000 99,999:       Generally safe
70,000 79,999:       Might be too short; probably all right
100,000 109,999:    Might be too long; probably all right
Below 70,000:           Too short
110,000 or above       Too long

In my personal case, I find it difficult to write a story longer than ~40,000 words. Sometimes even less. I consider them novellas. From a self-pub perspective, it seems that less is more when considering return on invested time. Shorter books cost less to print (more profit for the author) although it hardly matters with the preponderance of ebooks nowadays. Also consider audience behavior and preference. ADD-sufferers and multitaskers will more likely read your story if they can do so in a day or two, nay, in a few hours.

Short answer: it depends.... :o JMO

AQ
« Last Edit: March 05, 2017, 01:24:01 PM by Artemis Quark »

Jo Bannister

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My publishers (crime/thriller) seem happiest in the 75-85,000 word bracket.

Lin

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I try to write a 95-100K novel but in the early stages, first draft, I make it 85K words so that I can add in descriptions where I missed an opportunity to expand on dialogue or story. In that respect, I don't go over the limit. If you are a star like Penny Vincenti, then you are probably looking at a 200K novel. This is only because she is well known and the publisher knows she will sell. It's all about sales and quality of the story. On this last book I have written, it was hard to find an ending, then after reading it through, I discovered I could end it there and then, there was no more story to tell. I am now up to 88k words. I will probably do a sequel next, but the point is that you can keep writing and there isn't really any more story left.

Be prepared to cut out whole chapters! What you think is wonderful, you might have to 'kill your darlings' half way through. Your publisher/editor will guide you. I know this is often heartbreaking for the new writer, but it's something we all have to learn.  If the story isn't moving forward, you may have to delete.

Anyway whatever stage you are at, I wish you luck.    :)

Lin

Offline lamont cranston

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My publishers (crime/thriller) seem happiest in the 75-85,000 word bracket.

Ok, that seems typical for that type of book. 

Offline lamont cranston

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I met a literary agent last night and she has offered to help me find someone to handle the book. 

A friend, another editor, read some of it and suggested I get Ann Tyler's agent.

I'm like, yeah, sure, how about we start a LITTLE lower on the totem pole first.  LOL   

Lin

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Yes, I agree with you, get your work in order first before you go seeking out an agent or publisher.  Just think what might happen if they ask for more and it isn't finished?  You might go rushing it and then it's not up to standard after all and gets rejected.  It happens!

With all new writers, all they want to do is submit to a publisher.  You have to make sure your book is the best it can ever be before you do this.  99.9% perfect. Don't take any more risks.  Remember the cheapest isn't always the best! I think the editor I recommended is willing to assist you with payments - ask her.

Lin x
« Last Edit: March 19, 2017, 06:56:03 PM by Lin Treadgold - Author »

Offline Gyppo

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On the other hand, if your book is complete, and you're happy with it...  There's a thin line between caution and procrastination.

You never know until you ask.

Back in the last century the lady who typed up the submission copy from my rough two finger typed script put me in touch with one of the UK's leading agents. He liked my book but was unwilling to chance his own reputation, as opposed to the reputation of his firm.  So he passed me on to the 'new girl'.  She, being a lean and hungry new agent, worked her arse off and found me a publisher, Robert Hale.

She didn't like my second book, so we parted amicably enough.  She is now highly respected with her own stable of 'names'.

I then wandered off to write shorts, articles, and won regular columns in a few magazines over the next couple of decades.

So you never know until you ask.

Gyppo
My website is currently having a holiday, but will return like the $6,000,000 man.  Bigger, stronger, etc.

In the meantime, why not take pity on a starving author and visit my book sales page at http://stores.lulu.com/gyppo1

Offline lamont cranston

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Yes, I agree with you, get your work in order first before you go seeking out an agent or publisher.  Just think what might happen if they ask for more and it isn't finished?  You might go rushing it and then it's not up to standard after all and gets rejected.  It happens!

With all new writers, all they want to do is submit to a publisher.  You have to make sure your book is the best it can ever be before you do this.  99.9% perfect. Don't take any more risks.  Remember the cheapest isn't always the best! I think the editor I recommended is willing to assist you with payments - ask her.

Lin x

I've had a couple people read it now (it is done, I'm just fixing some of the dialogue he-said-she-saids to trim some of those out, and have to name a couple more chapters).

Nobody so far seems to think it needs an editor going over it.  Just get an agent.

I spent about 4 months reading it out loud, finding small errors, and my husband has proof read it all the way through a couple times.  It's clean.
« Last Edit: March 19, 2017, 07:33:19 PM by lamont cranston »

Lin

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Agents are not easy to flush out these days.  Many of them actually don't reply to your requests. You have to read their website thoroughly. I prefer to find a publisher that will not have to go through an agent, but it's not for the want of trying and I will keep on doing so, but remember you have to pay the agent fees.  I would rather make profits on my own books and let a publisher do the rest.  So far it's doing okay.

My own plan is to have a number of books out there and allow 'nature to take its course'.  See what crops up with time.  Of course, there is a lot I can do for myself.  I think you have to ask what you want out of all this and go for it. I think having learned now what not to do, you are on the right track. Best get a couple of people to read it, after all beta readers are your future customers.

Good luck,

Lin  ;)  
« Last Edit: March 20, 2017, 05:20:52 AM by Lin Treadgold - Author »