Author Topic: Third Person POV - Questions  (Read 2362 times)

Offline PaasionateWriter

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
Third Person POV - Questions
« on: October 04, 2015, 11:51:15 PM »
Hello All,

Please clarify!

Third Person POV:

1. If my protagonist faints, I am not supposed to write anything(what happens after she fainted) until she gains back her consciousness, right?

2. I should write what my protagonist see or feel and nothing beyond that. If I want to capture few incidents which happens in protagonist's absence, it's not possible. So I should either bring it up as she saw in her dream or something in similar lines, right?

3. My story is full of dialogue tags, yeah! I can say that my story has just 5 to 10% of non-dialogue version and the rest percentage are of full of dialogue tags? Is this okay?

Thanks in advance!

Regards,
Passionate Writer.

Offline bonitakale

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 497
    • BKEdits: Manuscript Line Editing Service
Re: Third Person POV - Questions
« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2015, 05:54:56 AM »
You sound as if you're writing in a very limited, close third-person POV. If so, you can't show what your POV character doesn't see, just as in first person. But many or most third person works are a bit looser than that, and have sections from other POVs. If you're tight into the hero's mind, and she faints, it's probably best to cut to when she wakes up, so the reader finds out what happens as she does. But you can still have chapters or sections from other POVs, as long as you put one in fairly early, so the reader isn't shocked when it turns up. A lot of mystery and suspense books have bits of the bad guy's mind here and there, and a lot of romances have parts from the POV of each of the two main characters. The whole third-person limited has opened up a lot in the past several decades, it seems to me.

Think of dialogue tags as necessary evils, like--oh, I don't know, maybe tampons or band-aids. You need them sometimes, but you don't want to feature them. Ideally, there will not be too many of them, and they won't be conspicuous--most of them should be "s/he said." You don't decorate your ms with "she giggled," "he responded," "she moaned," "he whined," any more than you decorate your body with cartoon character band-aids.

(Yeah, because I know everything, and what I say is always right.)
<a href="http://www.BKEdits.com/">Manuscript Line Editing at BKEdits</a>

Offline Matt Walker

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2762
Re: Third Person POV - Questions
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2015, 09:36:30 AM »
I agree with Bonitakale - there's no reason why you shouldn't switch POV to another character (as long as you start a new section/chapter). The omniscient viewpoint, where the POV hops from inside the heads of different characters without section breaks, is considered old fashioned now.
Represented by Sarah Manning of The Agency Group/United Talent Agency

www.walkerproductions.co.uk

hillwalker3000

  • Guest
Re: Third Person POV - Questions
« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2015, 09:48:45 AM »
There are two types of third person POV Ė

Omniscient Ė the narrator records everything happening as if floating above the scene. He can see what everyone is up to and isnít stuck with one characterí viewpoint. The downside is that it can come across as rather clinical Ė almost like a witness report. Thereís also the danger that if you spread your focus too thinly on so many characters itís difficult for the reader to engage with your MC.

Limited Ė the narrator keep close to the MC and can only record what he/she sees, experiences and thinks. This makes it easier for the reader to empathise with the character and care what happens next. If you want to describe events when he/she is not present you have to make a clear switch to someone elseís POV. Generally this can work, but it needs to be used consistently. Donít just switch to someone elseís POV once and once only simply because youíre stuck for a way to get across a certain plot development.
Itís also worth bearing in mind that when a person faints they donít know that's what's actually happening. They might well suffer certain symptoms leading up to a loss of consciousness but they wonít know they're fainting.

Bringing up things she hasnít witnessed first hand in a dream sounds extremely flaky unless this is some kind of fantasy. Do you dream about events that happened when you werenít around?
 
Dialogue tags should be invisible. If youíre using them for every single line of dialogue you have a problem. Iím not sure what you mean by Ďmy story has just 5 to 10% of non-dialogue version and the rest percentage are of full of dialogue tagsí. There is no magical percentage. Read other books in the same genre written by well-established writers to see how they handle dialogue.

H3K

Offline Taylor

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 414
Re: Third Person POV - Questions
« Reply #4 on: October 08, 2015, 07:07:43 PM »
But you can still have chapters or sections from other POVs, as long as you put one in fairly early, so the reader isn't shocked when it turns up. A lot of mystery and suspense books have bits of the bad guy's mind here and there,

I'm worried.

In my current WIP I don't switch POV until I'm roughly three-thirds in - about 6000 words. I stay in this guy's head (even though he's not the bad guy) for the final third, and at the very end switch POV back to the MC for the finale.

Does it matter? I didn't think so, but in the light of what you said I'm not so sure now. Am I worrying unnecessarily?

"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away."

Philip K. Dick

Jo Bannister

  • Guest
Re: Third Person POV - Questions
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2015, 04:27:00 AM »
Personally, I think a lot of unnecessary angst goes into this.  You're the story-teller: it's your point of view that matters.  As long as you keep control of what each of your characters is bringing to the mix, and don't allow them to act on things they couldn't possibly have known, I have no problem with switching POVs.  I want to know what different characters are feeling, and why they're doing what they're doing.  If you're going to stick rigidly to one POV, you might as well tell the story in first person and be done.

hillwalker3000

  • Guest
Re: Third Person POV - Questions
« Reply #6 on: October 09, 2015, 04:58:47 AM »
I'm worried.
In my current WIP I don't switch POV until I'm roughly three-thirds in - about 6000 words.

I'd say that's not a problem. If you had switched POVs for a single chapter then reverted, simply to get out of a plotting problem, then it might look like a cop-out. But in your case I'm sure it's fine.

H3K

Offline Taylor

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 414
Re: Third Person POV - Questions
« Reply #7 on: October 10, 2015, 08:06:01 PM »
That's all right, then.  :)

Thanks.

Apologies for derailing the thread.  ;D
"Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away."

Philip K. Dick