Author Topic: Punctuation  (Read 8952 times)

Offline orchid15

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #15 on: January 19, 2006, 10:13:33 PM »
I have read that Americans as a whole hate the semicolon, so I never use them.  Of course, I haven't been published either.

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Offline goldanon

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2006, 11:47:08 PM »
It's true.  Americans do hate the semicolon.  I'm not sure why - I think they consider it "snobbish," or something!  Most sentences can use a period where the semi-colon is used.  There's a blogger in my 'writingup' blog who does a 'grammar blog.'  He is very entertaining; makes grammar fun!
Here is a link to a semi-colon blog that he put up the other day:

http://www.writingup.com/ed_butts/semicolon_punctuation_mark_with_an_identity_problem

Offline chillies

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #17 on: January 26, 2006, 02:51:58 AM »
goldanon, just viewed the blog you mentioned. Exactly what I needed, I was confused about the semicolon too.

Thanks for the tip

chillies

Dale Rhodes

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #18 on: February 02, 2006, 08:34:31 PM »
Hey everybody,

Pick up a copy of Strunk and White's, Elements of Style and Grammer, study hard, learn all the rules, and then break them every chance you get.   :P

Dale

Offline Eroica

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2006, 07:37:57 AM »
Strunk and White's, Elements of Style and Grammer ...
A spelling book might also come in handy!  ;D

Dale Rhodes

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #20 on: February 03, 2006, 09:15:55 AM »
Grammer?...Grammer?...I don't need no stinking grammar!   ::)

Offline Mr. Bits

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #21 on: February 03, 2006, 10:34:39 AM »
i agree Stop or I'll scream is ambiguous in terms of comma use. You can make a case both for
including a comma after Stop, and for leaving it out. It depends on the effect or rhythm you want
to create.

But I also thought It was a dark stormy night was unclear in terms of comma use. The 'right' answer
was to put a comma after dark, but I would argue that dark and stormy are commonly associated
words that belong together, eliminating the need for a comma. In a similar way, you can write:

Little old lady

rather than

Little, old lady.

Because little and old are closely associated with one another in this description. Again, it depends on what impression you want the reader to have.
« Last Edit: February 03, 2006, 10:36:42 AM by Mr. Bits »

Offline chillies

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #22 on: February 03, 2006, 03:02:27 PM »
In the case of dark and stormy. A comma can be used if the words can be changed around, for instance if you can say: A stormy, dark night as well as: a dark, stormy night without changing the intended meaning, then a comma can be used. In the case of little old lady, the lady is old, this is taken for granted, you could not say: old little lady as grammatically this would be incorrect therefore a comma can not be used after little.

Have I confused things further?

chillies

Offline Linda Aitchison

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #23 on: February 03, 2006, 03:06:59 PM »
I'm afraid I'm one of the sad breed that feels their nerves jangle when an apostrophe is in the wrong place or not there at all.

Why do we see the following...?

Writer's
Writers
and Writers'

...all in titles referring to more than one wordsmith? To me, it just makes them look silly.

(Except of course in a URL!!) ;)

You can sign up for the Apostrophe Protection Society at:

www.apostrophe.fsnet.co.uk
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Offline prophetcharlesb

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #24 on: February 04, 2006, 09:36:59 AM »
Eroica, would you tell bout your crest?
"A man who has never made a woman angry is a failure in life"

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Offline Eroica

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #25 on: February 04, 2006, 10:50:40 AM »

Offline prophetcharlesb

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #26 on: February 04, 2006, 11:46:57 AM »
Right coat of arms. Im use to using crest cause most folks in the USA call it that. Anyway, would you tell me bout it.
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Offline Foxy

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #27 on: February 04, 2006, 11:58:07 AM »
I think you are supposed to click on the underlined words, Coat of Arms, Prophet.
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Offline prophetcharlesb

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #28 on: February 04, 2006, 02:41:53 PM »
I did click on it but didnt see the explaination of what each symbol of the CoA means. Thats what I want to know. ;)
"A man who has never made a woman angry is a failure in life"

christopher morley

Offline Eroica

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Re: Punctuation
« Reply #29 on: February 05, 2006, 04:59:40 AM »
I did click on it but didnt see the explaination of what each symbol of the CoA means. Thats what I want to know. ;)
It's supposed to be the old Hiberno-Norse CoA for Dublin (which was a Norse colony in the middle Ages). The Raven is one of Odin's Ravens (Huginn and Muginn), and the thing it's standing on represents the "ford of hurdles", a latticework of osiers which was placed in the ford on the River Liffey to allow the inhabitants of Dublin to cross dryshod. The original Gaelic settlement which preceded the arrival of the Vikings was called Áth Cliath ("ford of hurdles").

The motto, in Gaelic, reads Beart do réir ár mbriathar, which means "as good as our word"!
 :)