Author Topic: Deconstructing a book  (Read 9654 times)

Wolfe

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Re: Deconstructing a book
« Reply #30 on: February 18, 2015, 11:16:01 AM »
Hehe. The trick is to make it look easy. Like perfection just slipped from your fingers and onto the page. Only authors know otherwise. ;)

Offline Mrs N

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Re: Deconstructing a book
« Reply #31 on: February 18, 2015, 04:46:26 PM »
Don't get so hung up on the bricks that you lose sight of the building.

I won't, Jo.  ;)

The crunch will come when they discuss one of my own books - my latest novel is going to be the choice for June I'm reliably informed.
H3K

Will you be able to look them in the face without wanting to stab them through the heart if they don't love it? (Hmm, didn't realise I had such violent tendencies. Maybe I'm a thriller writer!)

I was wondering if any contemporary authors/bestsellers have dared to show part of their first draft to compare with
 the published version.

I went on a course where the author did just that. It wasn't that helpful though. Just a bunch of scribble like my own pile of sh**e. Mind you, the finished product wasn't that great either. And that was before I'd learned to deconstruct!!  ;D

ST, I get what you are saying about the essence of the first creative draft is sometimes lost in the polishing, but, as readers, do we really want to have to slough off the rough? Hmm, I don't know.

Well, what fun discussions, shame I had to go to work.  :D

Offline Simple Things

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Re: Deconstructing a book
« Reply #32 on: February 18, 2015, 05:02:00 PM »
Every story begins in draft. But I thought you were looking at this as a writer when mentioning deconstructing a book. As a reader I don't do that.

If you think rough drafts aren't as important as the finished, well, I don't know.

Offline Mrs N

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Re: Deconstructing a book
« Reply #33 on: February 18, 2015, 05:18:45 PM »
I tore sentences down to almost their individual letters in order to understand writing. How characters interact; how their differences play upon each other, their surroundings, their choices. The scenery, setting, back story, all that too. And then came the wording - what is needed, what is not, and more importantly, are those gray areas of reader's forgiveness.

You are way beyond me. There is no way I could do that.


The problem I have with published books, is so many fingers went into that pie. It's edges, now polished, have lost a lot of the rawness, so it's more for display, rather than its intended use. An example of this can be found simply by looking at an original piece, and then seeing it revised. There are wording changes, structural changes, cuts and gouges, and though it seems better, in some ways it also lost part of that raw passion that was needed in the first place to create.

That's what I was referring to. Sorry I thought you were implying as a reader the first draft is important, whereas I suppose the reader wants the polished article. I'm looking at the deconstruction as a tool to help my writing.

Sorry, ST, I feel I have to work real hard to deconstruct your comment. And I'm not making much sense at all.  :-\ 


Offline Mrs N

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Re: Deconstructing a book
« Reply #34 on: February 18, 2015, 05:27:19 PM »
If you think rough drafts aren't as important as the finished, well, I don't know.


Of course I believe rough drafts are important. That's where it all begins. I think we are saying the same thing, just I'm saying it badly.  ;D

Offline Simple Things

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Re: Deconstructing a book
« Reply #35 on: February 18, 2015, 07:44:03 PM »
:) A BBF(Best Buddies forevah) discussion. We were talking with the same mind. :)