Author Topic: The Word: Glumly  (Read 3511 times)

Offline Carlton

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The Word: Glumly
« on: July 06, 2014, 12:58:43 AM »
The word Glumly can only be used to describe the mood(s) of people correct? Describing inanimate objects with the word Glumly is incorrect: right/wrong?

Is this phrase wrong: "It rattled and shrieked at the slightest movement, glumly seconded by the bucket tied to its rear..."?

 ???

Offline Don

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2014, 02:31:17 AM »
If you use personification, as you have done here with the bucket, you could use the word glumly.

That said, I'm not a fan of adjectives or adverbs.

Don -
I have a motto: when in doubt, go for the cheap laugh.

Offline Slow_Walker

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2014, 05:08:13 AM »
The word Glumly can only be used to describe the mood(s)

How many different moods can 'glumly' be used to describe - especially at any given moment?

Offline Mrs N

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2014, 06:11:41 AM »
I smiled, glumly.

Unreliable narrator?  ;D ;D
« Last Edit: July 06, 2014, 06:13:45 AM by Mrs N »

Offline bonitakale

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2014, 08:17:27 AM »
Sure, you can smile glumly. It's that fakey smile that means, "I'm sucking it up, but I don't like it."

It's a funny word, though--sounds a bit like a character in a child's book: "On Wednesday, Mr. Glumly met a hippopotamus at the Piggly Wiggly." 
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Offline Slow_Walker

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2014, 12:12:49 PM »
Bonitakale,

If you'd been brought up in the UK, you might remember a radio programme called "Take it From Here" (broadcast 1948-1960. Good old Wiki!), which introduced a series of sketches involving a family named "The Glums"...and yes, they were!

Offline Gyppo

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2014, 03:51:45 PM »
Slow Walker:  Mr Glum and his daughter Ethel (Eth) and her thick boyfriend, Ron ;-)  I can't remember Mrs Glum at all.

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Carlton:  You can personify objects.  But it's usually done through the sounds they make, rather than their appearance.  Such as car brakes squealing in protest.  Tyres howling as they shed rubber  The whine of a tortured gearbox.  The resigned almost apologetic crump as the wing of an overstressed plane folds back against the fuselage.

On the other hand anyone who has found an old motorbike or car in a barn, or half buried in undergrowth, will know that sometimes objects do indeed look forlorn.  And some vehicles, rightly or wrongly, do look positively malevolent.

But it's probably best not to overdo the metaphors ;-)

Gyppo
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Offline Carlton

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #7 on: July 08, 2014, 12:22:44 AM »
Thanks guys!

Jo Bannister

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #8 on: July 08, 2014, 03:31:47 AM »
The resigned almost apologetic crump as the wing of an overstressed plane folds back against the fuselage.

Gyppo

A technical observation, Gyppo:  If the wing of my overstressed plane folded back against the fuselage, the last thing I'd be doing would be seeking a metaphor to describe the sound it made!  (Anyway, it wouldn't be apologetic - it would be triumphant, even malicious.)

Offline Vienna

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #9 on: July 08, 2014, 09:11:52 AM »
Perhaps another thread, but the question could arise: is anything incorrect? Ahhhhhhhhhhhhh I can hear the upholders of all the rules screaming in protest and indignation, "horrified" of Tunbridge Wells is writing a reply now. Cannot remember who said " Creative people of all kinds have their creativity stopped by their University education" (or something like that)
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hillwalker3000

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #10 on: July 08, 2014, 12:03:32 PM »
Perhaps another thread, but the question could arise: is anything incorrect? Ahhhhhhhhhhhhh!

Good question. I would say that anything goes - with the proviso that the writer/artist/whatever understands the rules completely before choosing to break them. The problem so often is that the worst offenders don't even know they broke 'a rule' in the first place.

"mildly miffed",

Llandrindod Wells.

Offline Gyppo

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #11 on: July 08, 2014, 02:59:30 PM »
All writers are crazy ;-)

Barking,
of Essex.


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The ultimate proviso of all writing is 'does it work?'.  If the answer is a resounding yes, then the reader doesn't give a damn whether you deftly slipped a stiletto into a small crack in the rules, or drove a tank though one of the walls of convention.   But it does have to work.  Good intentions or a rebellious nature are not enough on their own ;-)
My website is currently having a holiday, but will return like the $6,000,000 man.  Bigger, stronger, etc.

In the meantime, why not take pity on a starving author and visit my book sales page at http://stores.lulu.com/gyppo1

Offline Soul Writes

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Re: The Word: Glumly
« Reply #12 on: August 15, 2014, 04:15:18 PM »
The ultimate proviso of all writing is 'does it work?'.  If the answer is a resounding yes, then the reader doesn't give a damn whether you deftly slipped a stiletto into a small crack in the rules, or drove a tank though one of the walls of convention.   But it does have to work.  Good intentions or a rebellious nature are not enough on their own ;-)
As an avid reader (as I imagine we all are in MWC), I wholeheartedly agree with this. An occasional quirky rule-twist by a good author who knows what they are doing, can really add something special.
Writing forces you to grasp at what is just out of reach
If you’re lucky you catch it; if not then maybe a glimpse