Author Topic: Networking and publicity  (Read 7736 times)

Offline Joe Mynhardt

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 5966
  • Tales from The Darkest Depths
    • Joe Mynhardt
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #15 on: December 30, 2013, 12:38:11 AM »
My goal is to write first, then go online, then take a break. I repeat that step over and over until I go to bed. Somewhere in-between I'll probably go to work,
do some dishes etc.  :D
Founder and CEO of Crystal Lake Publishing - Tales from the Darkest Depths.
Two time Bram Stoker Award nominated editor publishing only the best in Dark Fiction. Check out Crystal Lake's books and grab two free titles by joining the newsletter.

Offline 2par

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4740
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2013, 01:04:16 AM »
I'm the kind of person that has to do all the necessary things before doing the things I like.
For instance, when going shopping, I deny myself a nice lunch until I've accomplished all I need to get and do.
If I have to cook dinner, I first have to clean up the kitchen and get out everything I'll need for dinner, etc.

The first thing I do in the morning is check my e-mail because my daughter might have imploded during the night and I want to get her husband's hollering at me out of the way. Then I check the Words with Friends game, lest everyone think I don't want anyone to think I don't want to play with them, then I check my Family Site to see what all my children and sister in law are up to and I make the proper and expected comments. Then I check the Writer's Circle to make sure I didn't miss anything. Then I'm hungry so go fix breakfast, after cleaning up whatever mess Rod's made. Then, I decide to write. But, the cats have to be fed, let in or let out or need to be petted "right now", THEN...I decide I simply MUST write but I'm too tired by then so I go lie down and pretty soon the day is gone and I have to get dinner started.

Then, the whole thing starts again. Of course, I have to ramble on here and bother y'all instead of writing. ...sigh

Offline ma100

  • Esteemed Contributor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 30526
  • I don't need kinky boots, nothing will beat me.
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2013, 04:44:04 AM »
Many say social media is very important and I can imagine if you know the ropes it can be used as a tool. But, I had a Facebook page and most of the time I got messages from nude or scantily clad asian men wanting to be my friend. It put me off my cornflakes so I deleted it.  ::)

Twitter, I just can't understand at all.

Lin

  • Guest
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2013, 06:04:26 AM »
I think you have see over the top of all that trash and whenever I get someone wanting to 'friend' me I always check their own Facebook page before accepting their request.  I only accept other writers and people I know.  Usually if someone has only half a dozen 'friends' then I don't join their page unless they can prove to me they are a writer.  You have to be selective and when you are, Facebook works a treat. If you have an author page, as I do now, and one for your personal friends, then that works well.

Last week I found a friend I haven't see in ten years.  We lost each other's contact adresses.  As a result of Facebook we are now back together again.

If it's not Facebook it will be something else in 2014 and onwards.  So it's important to go with the flow.

Happy New Year.

Lin  :D

« Last Edit: December 31, 2013, 04:53:55 AM by Lin Treadgold »

Jo Bannister

  • Guest
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2013, 07:16:08 AM »
I wonder if all this self-promotion actually achieves much?  I know it's never sold me a book.  Frankly, I'm not nearly as interested in writers (self-absorbed bunch of navel-gazers!) as in what they write - any more than I'm interested in the guy who makes my Weetabix or designed my car.  And I speak as a writer who knows she's not a bit interesting herself.  Reading about me is more likely to put people off buying my books than make them buy more. 

Besides, the business of writers is to write.  It's the bit I can do that nobody else in the chain can.  If publicity drove sales, don't you think publishers would be keener on doing it?  Instead of which, the publicity budget for the average mid-list book is negligible.  If it comes to a choice between writing and self-promo, I know which I'd rather spend my time on.  It won't make me famous, but at least I've something to show for it besides a ton of e-friends I wouldn't know if I met them in Tesco's.

Lin

  • Guest
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2013, 07:27:41 AM »
Hi Jo

I have to admit I have sold books as a result of 'friends' on my page.  In fact,  quite a lot of them have bought my book. I also got a number of people who wrote to me to say how much they had enjoyed it - all through Facebook.  So I think it does work. It's especially useful as I am an RNA member and I do happen to know many of the members and we stick together on Facebook and help each other. I think networking is so important.

I don't think this is about real friends at all.  I think it's more about people getting to know you are an author and your book exists and where they can buy it.  If you want to sell lots of copies of your novel, I think you have to promote. My book is available in nine countries on Amazon. So putting in links is important too.

Lin

PS Just to let you know I edited 50 pages this morning!
« Last Edit: December 30, 2013, 08:04:36 AM by Lin Treadgold »

Offline MansuEdwards

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 29
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #21 on: December 30, 2013, 07:47:59 AM »
Agree with Wolfe. You have to focus on Writing. While you do that build a web presence, so people know who you are and having a coege student run your social media platforms is a good idea which someone suggested. I advise you to embrace social media.

Offline protekme

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 441
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #22 on: December 30, 2013, 12:58:44 PM »
I wonder if all this self-promotion actually achieves much?  I know it's never sold me a book.  Frankly, I'm not nearly as interested in writers (self-absorbed bunch of navel-gazers!) as in what they write - any more than I'm interested in the guy who makes my Weetabix or designed my car.  And I speak as a writer who knows she's not a bit interesting herself.  Reading about me is more likely to put people off buying my books than make them buy more. 

Besides, the business of writers is to write.  It's the bit I can do that nobody else in the chain can.  If publicity drove sales, don't you think publishers would be keener on doing it?  Instead of which, the publicity budget for the average mid-list book is negligible.  If it comes to a choice between writing and self-promo, I know which I'd rather spend my time on.  It won't make me famous, but at least I've something to show for it besides a ton of e-friends I wouldn't know if I met them in Tesco's.

And I speak as a writer who knows she's not a bit interesting herself.  Reading about me is more likely to put people off buying my books than make them buy more.

 ;D ;D ;D That made me laugh so much because it's exactly how I feel. It's better to be quiet when we have nothing interesting to say than open our mouth and prove it. I don't doubt the benefits of that type of media for writers who are good at it and enjoy it. I'm a moron in that field, and I might never publish because I'm not cut in for it. A Web presence is a lot of work, and my plate is already full just studying how to put my book online, or trying to find someone to do it for me, or find an agent to take me in (even this scares me because agents expect the writer to participate).

I have come to a standstill with my next book because of it, and I'm afraid to cool off and kill the spark. I did not consider publishing when I started this venture anyway. I only wanted to write my story. The idea came to me later when suggested by others. Seeing the result,    ;D I now wish I could publish, but not at the price it's asking me in time and effort. I'm waiting for a miracle. ;D ;D Perhaps one day I'll self-publish a few books just for me, to feel that I did not do all that work for nothing.

As they say in England: Pity!!!
-- People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found by others 
-- I have made this letter longer than usual only because I had no time to make it shorter
              Blaise Pascal

Offline 510bhan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63305
  • So many jobs to do . . .
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #23 on: December 30, 2013, 01:28:27 PM »
I wonder if all this self-promotion actually achieves much?  I know it's never sold me a book.  Frankly, I'm not nearly as interested in writers (self-absorbed bunch of navel-gazers!) as in what they write - any more than I'm interested in the guy who makes my Weetabix or designed my car.  And I speak as a writer who knows she's not a bit interesting herself.  Reading about me is more likely to put people off buying my books than make them buy more. 

Besides, the business of writers is to write.  It's the bit I can do that nobody else in the chain can.  If publicity drove sales, don't you think publishers would be keener on doing it?  Instead of which, the publicity budget for the average mid-list book is negligible.  If it comes to a choice between writing and self-promo, I know which I'd rather spend my time on.  It won't make me famous, but at least I've something to show for it besides a ton of e-friends I wouldn't know if I met them in Tesco's.

Hmmm . . . take note, this lady writes fiction. ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D I won't tell any secrets. J/K :D

Offline protekme

  • Sr. Member
  • ****
  • Posts: 441
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #24 on: December 30, 2013, 02:05:11 PM »
Hmmm . . . take note, this lady writes fiction. ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D I won't tell any secrets. J/K :D

And darn good ones too. She does not need the web to say something any longer--interesting or not.
-- People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found by others 
-- I have made this letter longer than usual only because I had no time to make it shorter
              Blaise Pascal

Offline 510bhan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 63305
  • So many jobs to do . . .
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #25 on: December 30, 2013, 02:20:29 PM »
 ;D ;D ;D ;D Agreed. ;)

Wolfe

  • Guest
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #26 on: December 30, 2013, 11:32:59 PM »
Many say social media is very important and I can imagine if you know the ropes it can be used as a tool. But, I had a Facebook page and most of the time I got messages from nude or scantily clad asian men wanting to be my friend. It put me off my cornflakes so I deleted it.  ::)

Twitter, I just can't understand at all.

Most agents and editors want you to do the social media thing. It's a necessary evil in order to reach the younger, more tech-savvy, readers. But, I can tell you right now, you need none of it. At a minimum, I recommend a homepage so fans can get updates on your projects or to sing your praises.

Other than that, the only thing required is for you to write.

Cormac McCarthy does none of it. In fact, his 'homepage' is ran by his fans more or less. His lack of media interest hasn't hurt his career. In fact, it's added something of a mystique to him.

But the bottom line is the bottom line. Write and write well. The rest means nothing if you can't string a story or two sentences together to save your life.

All that said, let me say this: The most fanatical of fans are created if you connect with them. When you create that level of loyalty, they'll buy your work no matter what.

On the opposite end, Chuck Palahniuk has the most fanatical fans I've ever seen outside of J.K. The website is called The Cult for a reason. Between his lessons in fiction writing, his review of fan-fiction, and general and electronic outreach, you'd be hard-pressed to find more loyal fans.

It doesn't hurt that he's a really cool guy too.

Again, regardless, do what makes you feel comfortable. But always make your writing come first if you want a career in the business.

A platform ain't shit if your writing is too.
« Last Edit: December 31, 2013, 07:02:14 PM by Wolfe »

Jo Bannister

  • Guest
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #27 on: December 31, 2013, 04:03:07 PM »
What kind comments from Sio and Pro!  (Does that sound like a double-act in the making?)  And, as so often, Wolfe's take is hard to argue with. 

I'm sure that, done well by someone who's good at it, it's another tool in the kitbag.  And good luck to those who can make it work for them.  Just, don't believe the old newspaper adage, All publicity is good publicity.  It ain't.  And, like elections, it's not the first returns that count, it's who forms the government.  It could be a while yet before we know for sure how much networking is a positive thing and when, or if, it becomes self-defeating. 

Offline bri h

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 18523
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #28 on: December 31, 2013, 04:48:17 PM »
Hey Jo. Interesting thread. Didn't the guy who wrote 'Wool,' use the net to totally promote his book(s)? HNY.xbx
Fare thee well Skip. We're all 'Keening' now. xbx

Offline thatollie

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1443
Re: Networking and publicity
« Reply #29 on: December 31, 2013, 07:34:28 PM »
I think every aspiring young aspiring writer in college right now (And most everyone under 30) is fluent in social media, and understands the impact it can have on a career. Any career.

I'm not fluent in social media and I'm under thirty by, at least, nearly as much as I think I am.
Never make a decision standing up.