Author Topic: Lucid dreaming  (Read 1952 times)

Offline Mastafrank

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Lucid dreaming
« on: February 26, 2014, 09:02:08 PM »
So last night when I was dreaming I wanted to remember what I was seeing so I started naming objects that I saw into my voice recorder.When I woke up I realized that I didnt have a recorder but I remebered pretty well everything I saw...

Superman flying
Batman looking dejected (lol)
Excavators
school building
school bus driving slow

Military jets
hilly terrain
snow
skiing

Freaky stuff lol


Anyone can do this,just start small.Once you realize your dreaming than it becomes easier to remember specific details.

Don't try to alter your dreams drastically or else you'll crash aka wake up ;)

Offline Don

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Re: Lucid dreaming
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2014, 10:55:58 PM »
No girls?  ???

What a nightmare.
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Offline thatollie

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Re: Lucid dreaming
« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2014, 11:41:33 PM »
No girls?  ???

What a nightmare.

Maybe Frank's into Superman and Batman, you never know.
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Offline Mastafrank

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Re: Lucid dreaming
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2014, 12:29:08 AM »
Maybe Frank's into Superman and Batman, you never know.
I rarely dream about women  :o


FYI batman was pissed cuz he couldn't fly like superman

Offline 2par

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Re: Lucid dreaming
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2014, 02:57:43 AM »
No, he was pissed because he didn't have a girl to dream about.


Offline Matt Walker

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Re: Lucid dreaming
« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2014, 04:56:58 AM »
Frank, I think that had the potential to be a lucid dream, but it doesn't sound like you became fully lucid. A lucid dream is when you recognise you're dreaming whilst in the dream itself and become conscious. This allows you, with a lot of practise, to literally do anything, and the dream reality is often more 'real' than reality itself, with heightened senses and colours and feelings etc.

I first came across lucid dreaming a few years back with the great book 'Exploring the World of Lucid Dreaming' by Howard Rheingold and Stephen LaBerge, but I only started to actively practise from September 2013 when I started a dream journal. I had lucid dream 'flashes' where I'd become conscious during dreams less than every month, and each period of lucidity lasted less than a minute before the dream faded and I awoke. I now have a lucid dream on average every 9 or 10 days, and the last one was about 5 minutes. Apparently, with practise, one can have lucid dreams at will lasting up to an hour, and you can fly, and have superpowers, and be anything and do anything (and anyone); I'd recommend everyone put in the effort to learn. I've been practising 6 months and now try to explore the dreamworld 'normally' prolong the experience. I had one only a couple of days ago and became lucid when I was in this log cabin watching a cartoon version of Harry Potter. (?) I don't have the skill to teleport about yet, and instead of getting really excited and losing my grip on (dream) reality I ate an orange from the table. It tasted exactly as oranges do in real life. And then I hovered a CD case above my palm, which was quite cool, and then broke it in half and ran my hand across the edge. It felt rough and 'real'. It's almost as if the whole episode really happened, but when I was drowsy or something.

Anyway, sorry for the essay. But I have slow sleep insomnia (it takes me more than an hour to fall asleep, which means the WILD technique [Wake-Induced Lucid Dreaming] is unavailable to me) and before I started I hardly remembered any of my dreams. Now I remember a dream most nights, so I think anyone can learn if they really want to.
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Offline 2par

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Re: Lucid dreaming
« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2014, 07:03:25 AM »
How interesting.
I occasionally have pre-cognitive dreams and visions (very seldom though).
« Last Edit: February 27, 2014, 07:04:56 AM by 2par »

Offline Mastafrank

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Re: Lucid dreaming
« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2014, 02:54:04 PM »
Holy crap matt  :o :D

I am aware that I am dreaming sometimes but can't change my dreams just yet

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Re: Lucid dreaming
« Reply #8 on: February 27, 2014, 04:02:32 PM »
Frank, I think that had the potential to be a lucid dream, but it doesn't sound like you became fully lucid. A lucid dream is when you recognise you're dreaming whilst in the dream itself and become conscious. This allows you, with a lot of practise, to literally do anything, and the dream reality is often more 'real' than reality itself, with heightened senses and colours and feelings etc.

Yep. I have to agree with that.

Years ago, I used to have this nightmare, in which a faceless bloke would enter my house, walk into my bedroom and start doing things to me that I really didn't appreciate. I'd wake up, trembling and drenched in cold sweat, and be afraid to go back to sleep.
This dream would come back most nights, and in the end I was so fed up with it, I wanted to put a stop to it once and for all. So I told myself, if it happened again, I'd defend myself.

The dream came again, I pressed my fingers into this faceless guy's eyes (don't ask me how, but in a lucid dream everything is possible), and then woke up. And only my fingers were wet this time.
The dream never came back again.

After that, I had many lucid dreams, because now that I'd discovered how to influence my dreams, it was easy, and soon enough it became natural to me. I still have lucid dreams most of the time.

Offline 2par

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Re: Lucid dreaming
« Reply #9 on: February 27, 2014, 05:20:00 PM »
I found that works, Nel. I used to have disturbing dreams after something disturbing on the news or somewhere. Then I began telling myself not to dream of those things, and it stopped happening.

A few weeks ago, I had such a disturbing dream that I partially woke crying and screaming angrily. I willed myself to finish the dream to a good conclusion. Though I knew I was dreaming, and I kept telling myself it was only a dream, I continued being upset and determined to finish it. I did.

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Re: Lucid dreaming
« Reply #10 on: February 27, 2014, 05:26:11 PM »
I found that works, Nel. I used to have disturbing dreams after something disturbing on the news or somewhere. Then I began telling myself not to dream of those things, and it stopped happening.

A few weeks ago, I had such a disturbing dream that I partially woke crying and screaming angrily. I willed myself to finish the dream to a good conclusion. Though I knew I was dreaming, and I kept telling myself it was only a dream, I continued being upset and determined to finish it. I did.

Yeah, it really does work. And there's always the little details that tell you you're dreaming. Things like different curtains, or a piece of furniture that has been moved, a vase where it shouldn't be... That's when you know and can start intervening.