Author Topic: Writing, in Fashion  (Read 5598 times)

Offline 2par

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #15 on: September 01, 2013, 10:06:30 AM »
I love these children stories. There's hope for the future yet.

My son and daughter in law always talked to their children too like that and a few of my other children, seeing them seldom over the years, thought them a bit strange. But, one by one, as they've visited and gotten to know them, they realize that they're well prepared for adulthood and are good thinkers and nice people, even if their noses are always in a book. They have a hard time remembering that I talked to them too, haha.

Offline 510bhan

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #16 on: September 01, 2013, 03:50:57 PM »
My eldest son baffled them when the did the pre-school screening, base level entry test -- days of the week, numbers, colours etc.

When it came to colours he wasn't happy with the plain variety and continued through offering alternative until he got a nod from the teacher.

Brown was variously maroon, mahogany, chocolate, caramel,   red -- crimson, scarlet, fuchsia,   orange -- tangerine,   yellow -- lemon, grapefruit,   green -- emerald, olive, moss, lime  blue -- sapphire, turquoise, lavender


Now . . . apart from being an articulate little monkey, looking back, I suspect he was so discerning with specific colours as it turns out the little bugger was colour blind so he liked to make sure he was in agreement with folk on precisely what they meant. ::) 

Offline 2par

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #17 on: September 01, 2013, 03:55:28 PM »
That's hysterical. Reasoning at that age...!

Offline 510bhan

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #18 on: September 01, 2013, 03:57:30 PM »
I should have see the arguments coming -- very difficult when he was a teenager, had it all worked out. ;D

Offline 2par

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #19 on: September 01, 2013, 03:59:45 PM »
Yeah, my eldest was always right too. Except for that one time when he said it would rain at 3:05 that afternoon, and it didn't rain until 3:06.

Offline 510bhan

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #20 on: September 01, 2013, 04:03:38 PM »
Ooh! That must have hurt him. >:(

Offline 2par

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #21 on: September 01, 2013, 04:13:32 PM »
We keep trying to hurt him again, but he has the Best answers!

Offline bri h

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #22 on: September 01, 2013, 04:19:36 PM »
I miss mine every day.
Fare thee well Skip. We're all 'Keening' now. xbx

Jo Bannister

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #23 on: September 02, 2013, 09:35:36 AM »
I'm with Siobhan - I think it's part of our duty as writers to act as custodians for the language.  It's rich and nuanced and capable of almost infinite variety.  If people don't understand it, that's not the fault of the language, it's the fault of the people.  The answer therefore is not to dumb down the language but to smarten up the people.

The English have not always been in love with the lowest common denominator.  The Tudor theatres attracted huge audiences, at least many of whom were common enough to throw things if they were not pleased!  And the bill of fare - dramatically speaking - was likely to include a play by Shakespeare, another play, and some light entertainment in the interval.  A hundred and fifty years ago, Thomas Huxley instigated a series of Sunday evening lectures on science - and so many turned up that two thousand were left standing outside on the January pavement!  Today, to get a turn-out like that you'd have to be a footballer or a popstar.  And the audience would go away poorer, and loaded with expensive memorabilia, and knowing nothing they hadn't the day before.

When did we lose our attention span, our curiosity, our interest in the world beyond the end of our noses?  Was it, possibly, as education changed from a privilege to an imposition?  The more years youngsters spend in compulsory education, the less they seem to know at the end of them!  In parts of the world where people make real sacrifices to put their children through school, an education is valued and used, not sneered at and undermined.  And people who know what multi-syllable words mean are looked up to, not blue-pencilled by copy editors who know less about the Oxford English Dictionary than about Twitter!

Offline 510bhan

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Offline bri h

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #25 on: September 02, 2013, 11:00:13 AM »
Very well said Jo. I couldn't agree more. B
Fare thee well Skip. We're all 'Keening' now. xbx

Offline 2par

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #26 on: September 02, 2013, 12:13:16 PM »
Back in the '60s or '70s, Edwin Newman wrote a popular book bemoaning the modern usage of the language. It's articles and concerns concerning our language always lead me back to 1984, memories of which still make me cringe.

Offline Annmarie

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #27 on: September 02, 2013, 12:43:47 PM »
I often applaud your posts from the background, Jo. Well said.

I'll add another thing. The stories we tell are just as important as how we tell them. Time was a "great book" meant something sweeping, important. Now it can be something that just caught someone's fascination for a day or two but in  the end didn't impact them. Another thing to consume. Or great = sales. I wonder how often meaningful, risky and enduring stories and books are going to be written as attention spans shrink and money in publishing gets tight and our tastes are standardized along with the language.

1984 and Animal Farm should still be required reading in all English-speaking countries. I hope they still are, and that teachers have the guts to look at them critically in the light of society today. Examples of great books - the old meaning.  :)
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Jo Bannister

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #28 on: September 02, 2013, 03:41:10 PM »
Many thanks for kind words.  It is nice to be in the company of intelligent adults!

Annmarie's excellent point made me wonder which of today's writers and/or books will be considered classics in fifty or a hundred years' time?  (Just to declare a lack-of-interest: none of mine will!  They're for enjoying now, not trawling for deeper meaning in years to come.) 

But I'm not sure how many of today's big names will, either.  Not many of the big selling, popular writers, and not many of the niche selling prize-winners.  Have we no Jane Austens, no Bronte sisters, no Dickenses?  Will Harry Potter stand the test of time the way the Swallows and Amazons have?  Will anyone care to decipher the Da Vinci or another other Code once its moment has passed?  Cranford and Barchester seem as real today, the home of identifiable people with all too identifiable failings, as when they were conceived of generations ago.  Why haven't they dated? - or if they have, why doesn't it matter?  Because they were well written.  Many of the stories are very simple, but the writing brings them to life - and goes on doing so even though the language we speak has evolved so much that a degree of translation or at least inference may be necessary.

Anybody care to make some nominations for required reading around the year 2100?

Offline bri h

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Re: Writing, in Fashion
« Reply #29 on: September 02, 2013, 04:12:16 PM »
Many thanks for kind words.  It is nice to be in the company of intelligent adults!

Annmarie's excellent point made me wonder which of today's writers and/or books will be considered classics in fifty or a hundred years' time?  (Just to declare a lack-of-interest: none of mine will!  They're for enjoying now, not trawling for deeper meaning in years to come.) 

But I'm not sure how many of today's big names will, either.  Not many of the big selling, popular writers, and not many of the niche selling prize-winners.  Have we no Jane Austens, no Bronte sisters, no Dickenses?  Will Harry Potter stand the test of time the way the Swallows and Amazons have?  Will anyone care to decipher the Da Vinci or another other Code once its moment has passed?  Cranford and Barchester seem as real today, the home of identifiable people with all too identifiable failings, as when they were conceived of generations ago.  Why haven't they dated? - or if they have, why doesn't it matter?  Because they were well written.  Many of the stories are very simple, but the writing brings them to life - and goes on doing so even though the language we speak has evolved so much that a degree of translation or at least inference may be necessary.

Anybody care to make some nominations for required reading around the year 2100?

Oh yes Jo. One obvious one comes to mind straight away. What about ex coalminer turned Author Brian-h's brilliant memoir The Little Sisters of the Poor? They reckon it took the poor sod 10 years to write it. But what a brilliant book it turned out to be. The writing's so insightful, with brilliant techie ability. Every word is worth its weight in gold. I'm fortunate, I know the author personally so I have a signed copy. I got two and sold one on Z-bay for a mil creds.  ::)  ;D
Fare thee well Skip. We're all 'Keening' now. xbx