Author Topic: Foreign words  (Read 5709 times)

Offline protekme

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #30 on: December 17, 2012, 05:29:15 PM »
I don't see the problem, with stuff I have read they have included foreign words and references to things only the person from that culture would know about (the novel I am actually reading now does this), there has also been poems which have had whole stanzas in a different language (I know you are referring to prose but I'm just saying it has been done :P) and there are no translations - however the poet does use this for a certain effect. I personally wouldn't have a problem reading it, it depends on who you want to read your work I suppose and you can always use footnotes :)

Hope this helped (I know you already had a lot of input)

Will x

Every opinion counts. I know the author can do whatever he/she wants, but it's important to know the reader's preference. As a reader, I don't mind foreign words if the words are not of major importance and do not affect the understanding of the sentence. If it does, I like footnotes. I realize that we all see things differently. That's why I was asking . . .

Thanks for your input.
-- People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found by others 
-- I have made this letter longer than usual only because I had no time to make it shorter
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Offline protekme

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #31 on: December 17, 2012, 05:38:28 PM »
I don't feel italics will be necessary.


Lin

I might remove all my italics. It might also be easier to format in many cases. I have seen it both ways. So, I guess it is a matter of preference at the end . . . no broken rules.
Thanks.
-- People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found by others 
-- I have made this letter longer than usual only because I had no time to make it shorter
              Blaise Pascal

Offline protekme

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #32 on: December 17, 2012, 05:59:53 PM »

My book is a suspense novel set in postwar Essen (and one chapter in Berlin). What's yours?


My father-in-law was from Essen.

My book is a narrative nonfiction. It's the story of an Aryan, middle class family living in Berlin under the Nazi regime. (perspective of my mother-in-law--the protagonist)

-- People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found by others 
-- I have made this letter longer than usual only because I had no time to make it shorter
              Blaise Pascal

Offline Annmarie

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #33 on: December 18, 2012, 02:23:07 AM »
My father-in-law was from Essen.

My book is a narrative nonfiction. It's the story of an Aryan, middle class family living in Berlin under the Nazi regime. (perspective of my mother-in-law--the protagonist)


Sounds interesting. Do you know that wartime joke about the air raids in Essen versus Berlin?
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Offline protekme

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #34 on: December 18, 2012, 10:10:28 AM »
Sounds interesting. Do you know that wartime joke about the air raids in Essen versus Berlin?

I don't.Tell me. I know Berlin was bombarded a lot from 1943.
-- People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found by others 
-- I have made this letter longer than usual only because I had no time to make it shorter
              Blaise Pascal

Offline Annmarie

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #35 on: December 18, 2012, 02:06:39 PM »
I'm too tired right now to look for the German original, but here's a loose translation from memory:

A Berliner and an Essener start talking about the air raids. The Berliner says, "Two weeks after the last raid, we still had glass falling out of the windows."  The Essener replies, "Two weeks after our last raid, we still had Hitler portraits falling out of the windows!"


The dark/satirical humor that went around during and after the war was really interesting, especially the rhymes and songs. There's one I'd like to use as a front-of-the-book quote, but it has profanity in it so I probably won't.  :)

Now I'll stop hijacking your thread.  ;)
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Offline protekme

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #36 on: December 18, 2012, 03:02:29 PM »
Good joke, Annmarie.

Germans are known for their dark/satirical humor, especially Berliners.

No hijacking done. I believe people who wanted to answer my questions have already done so.
 

-- People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found by others 
-- I have made this letter longer than usual only because I had no time to make it shorter
              Blaise Pascal

Offline Vienna

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #37 on: December 18, 2012, 03:36:19 PM »
my father said he was in dresden a lot during the war said it was a very flat city............. ;D
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Offline tay-clem

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #38 on: December 19, 2012, 01:43:52 AM »
Personally, I love to see foreign words in books. I feel they give a certain foundation to the settings and characters. The only one that I'm a little iffy on is the Hapschenfuher (sorry if I butchered the spelling, I couldn't find it again in the recent posts when I went to reply) or "fire sergeant." I suppose if you gave it some context like:

Hapschenfuher Georg Von Trapp surveyed the charred and smoldering remains of the house, while the rest of the fire team began clean-up.

It would lead the reader down the logical path to a conclusion. It comes before a name, so it must be a title or rank. He is at the scene of a fire. Oh, he must be a fire chief or some sort of inspector.

I wouldn't worry so much about specifics and literal translations coming across. Most readers will be able to glean the general information from the story. Those that still have trouble will probably Google it.

Offline Vienna

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #39 on: December 19, 2012, 04:03:05 AM »
Sounds interesting. Do you know that wartime joke about the air raids in Essen versus Berlin?


My brother-in-law and his wife live in Essen.
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Offline Annmarie

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #40 on: December 19, 2012, 11:41:56 AM »
So do I.  ;D
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Offline Vienna

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #41 on: December 19, 2012, 01:00:27 PM »
interesting! they live in Moltkestraße......................
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Offline Annmarie

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #42 on: December 19, 2012, 01:35:06 PM »
That's not far from me. A nice area. I live in what some people call the Kaiserreich Heisingen. A stadtteil with its nose in the air.   ::) I just like living near the Baldeneysee.
Oh, hijacking again. Sorry.  :)
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Offline protekme

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Re: Foreign words
« Reply #43 on: December 19, 2012, 05:38:16 PM »
Personally, I love to see foreign words in books. I feel they give a certain foundation to the settings and characters. The only one that I'm a little iffy on is the Hapschenfuher (sorry if I butchered the spelling, I couldn't find it again in the recent posts when I went to reply) or "fire sergeant." I suppose if you gave it some context like:

Hapschenfuher Georg Von Trapp surveyed the charred and smoldering remains of the house, while the rest of the fire team began clean-up.

It would lead the reader down the logical path to a conclusion. It comes before a name, so it must be a title or rank. He is at the scene of a fire. Oh, he must be a fire chief or some sort of inspector.

I wouldn't worry so much about specifics and literal translations coming across. Most readers will be able to glean the general information from the story. Those that still have trouble will probably Google it.

I agree with you. I was debating for a while, and this forum helped me to understand that it's only a matter of taste and choice. I might not remove the German military ranks after all. Also, they would be difficult to translate. Hitler had changed the names for the SS and SA, and they are not relevant to the regular army. As you mentioned, when it is attached to a name, the reader gets the general picture.

Thank you for your opinion!!!
-- People are usually more convinced by reasons they discovered themselves than by those found by others 
-- I have made this letter longer than usual only because I had no time to make it shorter
              Blaise Pascal