Author Topic: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question  (Read 3644 times)

Offline Dawn

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #30 on: February 28, 2012, 03:58:38 PM »
 :o :o

Okay, how about a dwelling? ???
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Offline Dawn

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #31 on: February 28, 2012, 04:00:29 PM »
ich versuche  ;D ;D ;D ;

Ich bin wie ein Hund mit einem Knochen.
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Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #32 on: February 28, 2012, 04:02:56 PM »
It's been too many years and I never sprecend-de-Duche much as it were.

I need the dumb American-caveman version to that, Tony.

Offline 510bhan

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #33 on: February 28, 2012, 04:07:29 PM »
Enclosure ???

Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #34 on: February 28, 2012, 04:10:01 PM »
I guess so.

'Compound-Enclosure'  ;D

Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #35 on: February 28, 2012, 04:22:17 PM »
The German interrupter, who was assigned to our field-office spoke, read and wrote five or six languages. Her name was Martina Kneeling (and I’m not sure I spelled that correctly.) She was a beautiful girl. She could read a document aloud and have someone call out one of the different languages she spoke and without breaking stride, she switched to that language. She could do the same with writing.

Her favorite joke was: What do you call someone who only speaks one language? —American

Offline Annmarie

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #36 on: February 29, 2012, 03:54:20 AM »
The farm buildings as a whole and the space they cluster around are almost always called "Hof" in German. You might be referring to a "Gutshof," or an Estate in English. At least, I'd use the word estate for what you seem to want. Compound and barracks and so on sound way too military for me. The space between the buildings is then a courtyard, the entire area with buildings is an estate.
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Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #37 on: February 29, 2012, 12:12:13 PM »
Cool. Thank you. Hof-- I like that.

I'd like to go with something less militant than 'Compound' and slightly less German sounding as 'Hof'  ???

Offline Dawn

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #38 on: February 29, 2012, 03:40:46 PM »
small holding, farmstead, homestead, ranch, plantation, Bauernhof.
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Offline C.M.

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #39 on: February 29, 2012, 05:20:16 PM »
If you want a place near a castle where a secret entrance could be hidden, the English term would be bailey, as in motte and bailey. Motte is the castle and the bailey is the little community nearby where the poor folk live. The old Roman term would be the vicus - that cluster of bars and brothels that always seems to spring up outside an army base.    C.M.

Offline 510bhan

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #40 on: February 29, 2012, 05:25:12 PM »
A Bailey in a castle is a courtyard. In the Bailey there were guardrooms, stables, kitchens and storerooms. The Bailey would be in between the gateway and the motte.

The type of castle called motte and Bailey castle was named after the Bailey and motte inside it. The Bailey has just been described above. The motte is a keep at the top of the hill.

Offline 510bhan

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #41 on: February 29, 2012, 05:26:52 PM »
Some more pics

Offline 510bhan

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #42 on: February 29, 2012, 05:28:30 PM »
Another

Offline C.M.

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #43 on: March 01, 2012, 03:23:26 PM »
Thanks Sio. Every time I've ever read or heard about a bailey, no one has ever mentioned that it was inside the defensive perimeter. Thanks for that.    C.M.

Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: Old German Farmhouse Compounds // Name question
« Reply #44 on: March 01, 2012, 05:00:48 PM »
This is cool.