Author Topic: How to date a writer - funny and true!  (Read 2831 times)

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Re: How to date a writer - funny and true!
« Reply #30 on: February 20, 2012, 10:20:54 AM »
Just for the heck of it, I'm going to go over all the points made in the original and see if/how they apply to me.

#1 Nope. No illusions of grandeur whatsoever. Gave up on those a very long time ago.

#2 I'd like everyone to fall in love with my writing immediately. Who doesn't? But hey, I can't please everyone, and I've got enough sense to know that not everyone will like my writing. That's OK. I can live with that. It would be worse - far worse - if I didn't like my writing.

#3 Inexplicably moody. I guess this would seem true, though my moodiness usually isn't all that inexplicable after all. There's always a reason for it, even if I (let alone others) don't know it.  ;)

#4 Financially insecure. Nope. Thank heavens I'm not.

#5 No, I don't want my partner to be eccentric. I just want him to accept the fact that I might be just a little (okay, maybe a bit more than just a little) eccentric.

#6 Whether he wants it or not, my partner does turn up in fiction. So do my children, my whole extended family and most of my friends, frenemies and aquaintances. They don't, however, have to be prepared to do this. They don't even have to agree, and maybe - just maybe - they'll never even find out. I do change them rather drastically (even to the point of changing their genders) whenever I use them.  ;D

#7 My loved ones can and do interrupt when whenever they feel fit. That's not to say they won't regret their choice to interrupt me at an inopportune moment, but even so...  ;D
And, no, I don't smoke, and I never leave my bedroom in just my undies (I happen to be rather prudish). I did have a bowl of ice-cream today though, which is rather unusual for me. I even put the book I was reading away, so I wouldn't spill ice-cream on it. Books are sacred, after all.

#8 People should never yell at me. Not for any reason at all. It scares the living daylights out of me, meaning I might just... erm... well... hurt them. Accidentally, of course, but still. Nobody wants to scare me, trust me on that one.
Yes, I am weird - and proud of it. I'll discuss murder, mutilation and torture with my daughters over a cup of tea. Amongst other things.

#9 I wish! The sad truth is: they won't let me!  >:(

#10 What Valentine Day poems? I'm utterly un-romantic, and don't write lovey-dovey stuff. I say "I love you just the same as everyone else does, I suppose, and that's that.
I might, however, be able to come up with a lot of ways to tell someone that I'm not particularly fond of him/her.  ;D


Golly! I should post this on my blog...  :D

Offline Gayle

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Re: How to date a writer - funny and true!
« Reply #31 on: February 20, 2012, 12:24:00 PM »
The remark about friends and family turning up in fiction has always baffled me. Most of my characters personalities are constructed out of the themes of my story. For example, if the theme I'm working with is emotional responsibility vs. financial responsibility, I will make one character very emotionally responsible but useless in areas of finance and make another very financially responsible but very evasive emotionally, always blaming other people for how he feels or situations that he's not happy with.

I try to give all my characters at least one personality trait from my own personality. I like to think my "children" have inherited something from me.  ;)
« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 02:35:28 PM by Gayle »
"I was born of writing. Before that, there was only a play of mirrors." - Jean Paul Sartre

Offline Gyppo

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Re: How to date a writer - funny and true!
« Reply #32 on: February 20, 2012, 12:45:05 PM »
As far as I know I've never consciously based a character on any one friend or family member for the simple reason that if you do this the real personality will, at some point intrude into your story, and say "I wouldn't do that."  This is the last thing you need.

Composite characters are a bit different, because the bits drawn from each source will balance themselves out.

But I often borrow speech patterns or phrases from people I know.

As for drawing upon your own altertnative personality traits, I suspect that many of us do this.

Gyppo

My website is currently having a holiday, but will return like the $6,000,000 man.  Bigger, stronger, etc.

In the meantime, why not take pity on a starving author and visit my book sales page at http://stores.lulu.com/gyppo1

Offline Gayle

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Re: How to date a writer - funny and true!
« Reply #33 on: February 20, 2012, 03:15:51 PM »
I think I'm going to take a page out of Nelodra's book and answer each one as well:

#1 Illusions of grandeur? More like illusions of adequacy. I long ago gave up the idea that I will be the next great Canadian writer. It's easier that way.

#2 Must love my writing?: no. Must be supportive of my efforts: yes. Someone that I can bounce ideas off and get feedback from: definately! I would rather my partner give me honest feedback (both good and bad) on my work and ideas then lie his ass off and treat me like a mentally deficient child that must be humoured.

#3 Inexplicably moody?. Grouchy occassionally, when the work isn't going well, but as I say straight out "I'm having a rough time with my work", the term inexplicable doesn't really apply.

#4 Financially insecure and don't care for material things? I've worked a lot of very crappy jobs to support my writing habit; that's true. But I like being financially stable, so I do work other jobs. If your idea of comfortable is six figures then the relationship probably won't last; if it's 5 figures, then we'll be fine.

#5 Behave eccentrically? If we've gotten past the first, second, and third date, it means that I like spending time with the person you are. There's no need to put on a performance.

#6 Be prepared to turn up in my fiction? Have no fear; this won't happen. My characters are created to fit the themes of my work, not the people in my life.

#7 Never interrupt me when I'm writing? It's okay to interrupt me, but my receptiveness will depend on how often you're interrupting. Once or twice a day: no problem. Six times an hour could result in a rather impressive display of temper on my part.

#8 Don't yell at me when I'm daydreaming? Yell at me? Do you plan on making a habit of yelling at me? Why would my partner be treating me like a naughty child for thinking. If you find the sight of other people thinking this scary, the relationship will not last.

#9 Will I ignore you for days when I'm "on a roll"? I have never ignored anyone for days. See #7.

#10 Valentine's Day Poems? I'm not a very good poet so no poems on Valentine's Day. But I can write a rather sweet love note when the mood takes me, and I have written love notes and hidden them in my partner's bag or coat for him to find later. These romantic messages have never corresponded with any day on the calendar though, so you may get them randomly through the year rather then on Valentine's.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 03:20:20 PM by Gayle »
"I was born of writing. Before that, there was only a play of mirrors." - Jean Paul Sartre

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Re: How to date a writer - funny and true!
« Reply #34 on: February 20, 2012, 05:30:15 PM »
The remark about friends and family turning up in fiction has always baffled me.

To me, this happens very naturally. My characters are often based on friends and family - although rather loosely. Like I said, I change them, and usually rather a lot. It's not something I do consciously, though.

It goes sort of like this: My characters walk into my life the way friends and family do, and somehow they quite often seem to resemble my loved ones. And my not-so-loved-ones. I guess this means that I subconsciously base my characters on real people. On people I love - or hate.

Then, somewhere along the way, they'll surprise me by behaving differently from the real-life person they reminded me of when they first walked into my life. And I love those surprises.

Having said that, I have - once or twice - based a made-up character (as opposed to a walk-into-my-life character) on a real person. That was a lot harder. It made me feel restricted in my writing, as I was constantly asking myself "how would he do that?", "What would he say here?", and "If he read that, he'd probably go berserk!"

So... I guess there's two sorts of characters based on real persons. The spontaneous ones, and the made-up ones. The spontaneous ones are fine, and a joy to work with, whereas the made-up ones are a pain in the behind. Then again, I've never been very good at working with characters that I had to make up entirely. I always end up hating them, because they never become real to me.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2012, 05:31:51 PM by Nelodra »

Offline SamPerkins

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Re: How to date a writer - funny and true!
« Reply #35 on: February 21, 2012, 06:41:19 AM »
I have never based characters on people I know either, though I have cultivated personality. For instance, the antagonist in my story was just too nice. I couldn't believe that he would behave the way he was. Then, someone I know did something very wrong, though the person is a generally nice enough guy. Then I thought that I wasn't surprised that the person did what they did. So I Blockedysed the personality. And now, I can construct a more believable character. At least, that is what I hope!