Author Topic: Grammar Checker?  (Read 2825 times)

Wolfe

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #15 on: December 11, 2011, 09:11:21 AM »
If I recall the question correctly, Alfiemama asked a question about grammar . . . not style.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 09:13:21 AM by Wolfe »

Sam Cooper

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2011, 09:18:01 AM »
Luckily this is an open comment thread, not a critique-style, so opinions can be broader based, given freely. If you have a problem, you can pm me about it.

Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #17 on: December 11, 2011, 09:19:54 AM »
. . .    .
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Wolfe

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #18 on: December 11, 2011, 09:29:31 AM »
Luckily this is an open comment thread, not a critique-style, so opinions can be broader based, given freely. If you have a problem, you can pm me about it.

Funny. You critiqued my response though. Please point out where I critiqued someone else's response. On that note, I have no need to PM you. I've dealt with much worse.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 09:33:50 AM by Wolfe »

Sam Cooper

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #19 on: December 11, 2011, 09:43:34 AM »
Have you now? I wonder why.

If I had critiqued your response, it would have been put in quotes with your name attached. That way, you would know I was addressing you.

Next time I will clarify it better for you.

You have a nice day, Wolfe.

Sam

Wolfe

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #20 on: December 11, 2011, 09:49:34 AM »
Oh really?

I believe the commas can be removed, Wolfe. I know they are fine as is, in both examples but we rely on commas too much when many times that pause is not necessarily there.

You did call meóby nameóif you care to recall. And your snitty commentary isn't winning you any favors.

Is there some requirement, whenever I return to My Writers Circle, for someone I've never met before to give me grief or something? Did I miss this memo? Did I accidentally call someone's baby ugly again?

My apologies if I did. I seem to have that affect on people lately.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2013, 01:40:40 AM by Wolfe »

Offline Don

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #21 on: December 11, 2011, 10:49:25 AM »
Quote
Thanks Don, Which Grammar checker do you use? As I need one, which is more UK based.

Alfie, I use Microsoft Word and make a point of ignoring it . . . usually.

Now I have a question for Wolfe, at the risk of taking this thread off on a tangental trajectory. Using Alfie's sentence as an example, how big a negative impact would that have on most editors or agents? Would they continue reading the ms or simply return/circular file it?
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Offline Dawn

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #22 on: December 11, 2011, 11:36:38 AM »
Hey guys come on, it's Christmas :D (please add lovely Chrimbo hat to my smiley pleaaaaase oh and the Slade song

Thanks Don, glad you asked that question. I was also wondering the same.
Is OK generally accepted now though? Also I was wondering about anymore or any more?


Time to take it serious and get the job done

Offline 510bhan

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #23 on: December 11, 2011, 11:40:33 AM »
No -- usually okay/Okay. If you do use OK, or ok, never Ok [except at the beginning of a sentence where you are using ok]make sure it is consistent throughout and you don't mix it with okay either. :)
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Offline Dawn

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #24 on: December 11, 2011, 11:42:43 AM »
Thanks Sio.  How about anymore? Or am I right that it depends on the context?
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Offline 510bhan

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #25 on: December 11, 2011, 11:48:22 AM »
My spellchecker (Word) insists it is one word, but I think it lies quite a lot! Use discretion I say. Just like in to and into can be different and on to/onto,, up on/upon as well. :)
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Wolfe

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #26 on: December 11, 2011, 11:52:43 AM »
Now I have a question for Wolfe, at the risk of taking this thread off on a tangental trajectory. Using Alfie's sentence as an example, how big a negative impact would that have on most editors or agents? Would they continue reading the ms or simply return/circular file it?

Honestly, it depends on the agent, editor, and sadly the mood they're in. That's probably way too honest, but it is what it is.

Overall, though, no a single sentence won't make or break an agent or editor's opinion. They're looking for overall potential. A misstep in grammar here or there can be fixed with a copy editor's guidance if the manuscript shows potential for revenue.

That said, I'll admit I've sent back copies to agents with recommendations to correct grammar and punctuation. My copy editor would've killed me if I sent copy in such a rough draft state. If I heard nothing back, it told me the writer wasn't serious about a publishing career . . . though I always did hear back from the agent.

They weren't going to slice their own throats.

In most cases though, I saw the copy again in less than a month. But, to be brutal, I didn't reject copy because of grammar or punctuation. Most agents wouldn't let their proposals out the door unless it was as close to perfect as possible.

It was structure and story that caused me to reject proposals. You've heard it before, but if I didn't fall in love with the story and characters, I wasn't going to bat for it during the board meetings. I can fix grammar and punctuation, but I can't fix a poor story foundation.

That's the real deal breaker.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2011, 11:54:18 AM by Wolfe »

Wolfe

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #27 on: December 11, 2011, 12:06:49 PM »
Thanks Sio.  How about anymore? Or am I right that it depends on the context?

Both are correct, but depends on the context.

I don't like you anymore.

I don't want any more.

Here's the trick: if you can count the amount for any more, you'll use two words. If you cannot count it, it'll be the one word.

Offline Dawn

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #28 on: December 11, 2011, 12:09:43 PM »
Thanks Wolfe
Time to take it serious and get the job done

Offline Taylor

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Re: Grammar Checker?
« Reply #29 on: December 11, 2011, 12:57:33 PM »
Neat trick, Wolf.  :)

And cheers for the tip about the comma following the conjunction. Always wondered about that.

Further to what you said about an agent or editor, I think those of us who are serious about seeing publication would agree that it's best to submit a good story which is technically correct to boot. Just in case they are having a bad day at the office.  ;D

Further to what Lin said about where the comma should go after the closing quotation mark, in British English, it's a bit more complicated than that. The comma usually falls within the quotation marks if followed by presentational material such as he said or Tom replied. But if the quoted material is followed by something other than he said, she wrote, or the like, then the comma - in British usage - usually comes after the closing mark:

I hate the word 'palimony', and shun it.

In British usage, it's possible for the comma to come after the quotation mark even though the quotation is followed by she wrote:

Although she said on the phone 'Yes, you can', she wrote 'No you cannot' in her letter.

The reason for this reversal is that the she wrote applies not to the first quoted passage but the second.

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