Author Topic: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?  (Read 11088 times)

Offline Andrewf

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #30 on: October 29, 2011, 02:33:47 PM »
That's Lincoln added to my list of places to visit before I die.

It's a very long list, I may have to live forever ;-)

is this one of your own photos, Andrew?  

Unfortunately not.  It has been many years since i last visited the cathedral and didn't have my camera with me at that time.

It is best to visit on a bright sunny day where the light streams in through the many stained glass windows.

There is also a climb to the roof, but I wouldn't recommend this for you Gyp, as it involves a small spiral staircase surrounded by solid stone walls.
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Offline Gyppo

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #31 on: October 29, 2011, 09:45:30 PM »
I did the 'Steeple' Tour at Salisbury Cathedral a few years back.  I nearly chickened out when we went through a little door onto the stairs within the walls and the guide locked the door behind us after counting heads.  But I'm glad I didn't because quite a lot of it was along open galleries, looking down into the centre of the building.  But there were a couple of steep narrow spirals as well where the walls did seem to pulse a bit and close in.

But we had two kids with us so I had to be brave.  It does make a difference.   As does having plenty to see.  But if the lights had gone off I'd have been a wreck.

Magnificent views from the top of the tower though.  I still have the badge somewhere.  These are only issued when you reach the top.  You can't buy them at ground level.  It was fascinating to see the cone of the steeple, still rising above us.  From inside you can see how insubstantial it is, rather like looking into an ice-cream cone.  There were a series of wooden ladders going right up into the cone, to a small trapdoor where workmen can get outside when they need to do repairs, hanging from a bosun's chair or similar some 400 feet above the ground.  The wooden ladders are not part of the tour.

Even further back I took my two girls down the 'Poldark' mine in Cornwall.  Once again, not too bad in company, but when I started to think what it would have been like working down there by candlelight I got more than a little twitchy.  I can 'clamp down' on claustrophobia up to a point, but if it gets away from me I'm in trouble for a while.

I did the 'vaults' at Winchester Cathedral, but despite being underground they're quite spacious.  The only moment of panic there was when I stopped to look at something and the tour moved on out of sight.

I'm not sure I would want to do any of them again, but it was worth the discomfort and I'd recommend them to anyone else.   

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Offline Spell Chick

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #32 on: October 30, 2011, 07:47:28 AM »
I noticed when climbing UP the 100 stairs to kiss the Blarney stone, we were taken via the servants' staircase. Coming back down it was the owners' staircase. Those steps were more even, wider from wall to wall and the depth was much better suited to hold a foot instead of tiptoes.

That is unless we went UP the master and down the servant stairs. I really just remember the remarkable difference between the two staircases.
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Offline Gyppo

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #33 on: October 30, 2011, 03:17:31 PM »
Here's a bit of old Southampton, UK, which has survived almost untouched since Victorian times at least.

If you look above the massive rusty bolt, but below the smaller hasp, you will see the modern day handle and the ordinary mortice lock.  It looks really insignificant amongst all that sturdy iron banding.

The last time I peeped through the gap there was a couple of dusty old cars stored in there and various shrouded and unidentifiable lumps which could have been machinery or laden workbenches.

If I remember correctly the white notice asked the postman not to use the letterbox and showed a very faded redirection address.

Not fully shown in the picture is the big second storey loading bay above the door and the sturdy wooden beam hoist which would have been used to lower stuff onto lorries, and horse-drawn carts before that.

A lot of the old warehouses near the docks have been converted into flats, and the beam hoists have gone.  Sometimes cosmetically tidied as well, and other times just cut off flush with the wall.

I can remember seeing sacks and barrels being hoisted or lowered, and when I was very young sometimes it would still be a horse providing the power, moving back and forth along the road, led by a man who nearly always seemed to be wearing a brown warehouse coat.

Now there's huge double glazed windows in the loading bay entrances, and quite often the contents of the room beyond, displayed as if to show the occupant is 'living the dream', seem so incongruous in the ancient facade.  Especially in buildings which have been gutted by fire at some point and still bear the scorch marks on the brickwork above each opening.

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Gyppo
« Last Edit: October 30, 2011, 03:21:07 PM by Gyppo »
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Offline Ken100

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #34 on: October 30, 2011, 05:17:30 PM »
Here is a roundabout in Stourbridge. I run past this roundabout regularly, taking a left turn onto a Roman Road, which is now a singletrack trail, the town on one side, open fileds and countryside on the other.
In 1929, when this was still a crossroads, workmen were digging a trench here when they discovered a human skeleton three feet down. Suicides were once buried at crossroads, with a stake driven through the heart, as were criminals who had been gibbeted nearby. This practice was brought to an end in 1823.
The mystery of the skeleton at the crossroads in Stourbridge remains, and the skeleton was 'disposed of.'

I quite often think of that unknown person once buried at the crossroads when I run past that roundabout.

Ken
« Last Edit: October 30, 2011, 05:19:54 PM by Ken100 »
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Offline CarrieSheppard

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #35 on: October 31, 2011, 04:21:00 AM »
What an excellent series of posts and amazing pictures. Memphis looks fun, and Phoenix I recognise. I liked Hoover Street near the Heard Museum - skyscrapers nearby but a selection of houses as diverse as 'English Country Cottage' look to Pueblo, going via 'Old West' and everything in between. I'll post one of my pics soon. My town is on the crossroads of the two oldest Roman roads in Britain, on the Greenwich Meridian and the St Mary's Ley Line.

Offline Annmarie

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #36 on: October 31, 2011, 04:24:09 AM »
Neat story, Ken. I wonder about stuff like that too. Sometimes I walk around with my head in the here and now, and in some past time, and I see the buildings and crossroads through both lenses at the same time. For instance the school my oldest daughter will go to is a 100-year-old dark brick house at a roundabout a couple minutes from home. She's played in the walled-in grounds behind it often enough. She walks by and thinks "This is my school."

I walk by and think about how that school was a barracks for Russian slave workers during WW2. They'd gather in the yard to be marched off to work.

Almost every place has these layers. If we find out enough, we start to see them.

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Offline Ken100

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #37 on: October 31, 2011, 05:23:14 AM »
Sometimes I walk around with my head in the here and now, and in some past time, and I see the buildings and crossroads through both lenses at the same time.

Yep, that's me. I'm exactly the same. When I am walking somewhere, especially on holiday, I look at the side streets or the paths and think 'I wonder what's up there?' Sometimes it's a wonder I actually manage to get anywhere.
I live in a part of Stourbridge called 'The Old Quarter' and I still love looking around at the houses when I am out and about, and imagining them in the 1800s.
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Offline Gyppo

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #38 on: October 31, 2011, 06:08:45 AM »
Annmarie is right about the 'layers'.

When My Lady was earning her degree they were taught 'how to read a High Street'.  In most of our English high streets you'll find modern and garish shop fronts at ground level, but just look up one level and you'll often find totally unrestored and unmodified Victorian or earlier brickwork and windows.

Sometimes you will still find an old fashioned shop, where one of the front rooms of a house was used for business purposes.  Quite a lot of our sub post-offices were like this,  usually a house on a corner or a crossroads, with one room turned into a newsagents or similar - because just being a sub post office never earned enough money - and a secure room within a room, almost inevitably with only one access door for security reasons, where post office business was transacted through a hatch in a sheet of sturdy glass.

When Royal Mail went on a mad money saving campaign a few years back they offered inducements to the Sub Postmasters/Mistresses to close down the less economic offices.  As a lot of the officers were getting old they took early retirement, although some others decided to keep providing he service until they died of old age.  As  result of this many a downstairs room has been reclaimed, and some of the old houses now look huge again with a double spread of domestic frontage.

Royal Mail are generally pretty quick to take down their signs,  but some of the other businesses just leave them in place, or slap a thin layer of pain over the top and the business names can still be read at a certain angle.  Where the signs were a strip of illuminated plastic fascia board the quick fix is just to turn it back to front, which sometimes looks really daft.  But it's better than leaving a gaping great hole 'until they get around to it'.  Occasionally the lights are left on, so you get a back to front sign for a Chinese takeaway, which is quite bizarre.   

Sometimes the true history is lower down, a few strips of genuine cobbled street left as a concession to 'preservation' between soul-dead poured concrete or asphalt.

Gyppo
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Offline Annmarie

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #39 on: October 31, 2011, 06:50:55 AM »
I'm so glad other crazy minds see the layers like I do!

In Germany, if you're walking around regular streets, there are only three historical eras: pre-war, wartime and postwar. Many people, including me, live in multifamily houses with usually 6 units of between 70 an 90 square meters. These are utilitarian-looking, built in the 50s-60s. Certain architectural quirks like ceramic numbers over the door, or the shape of a window, show the house was originally built for refugees. Millions of ethnic German women, children and old people expelled from central and Eastern Europe after WW2 flooded into West Germany, and lived for years in bunker-style collective housing in filthy conditions, or in displaced persons camps.

The rather ugly but sensible multifamily houses all around here were the new homes for these people, and the locals who'd also lost their homes in the war. I don't think the houses are nice to look at. They don't have a soul on the outside. But when I think about when and why they were built, I suppose they're not so bad.
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Offline Ken100

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #40 on: November 08, 2011, 03:42:19 PM »
Here is a picture of Hill Street, in Stourbridge, where I live. My house is further up the street, out of view.
We live in a section of Stourbridge called 'The Old Quarter.' No one's allowed to knock any of the houses down anymore, and when our road and pavements were dug up and relaid in the summer the builders even had to keep the (original) kerbstones and relay them.

Anyway, I didn't post this to tell you about the kerbstones.
Not many people realise it, but Hill Street is the birthplace of Jack the Ripper.
Ok, let's clarify that a little bit...Hill Street is the birthplace of William Henry Bury, who is suspected of being Jack the Ripper, amongst many others.

Bury was born 25th May 1859. In October 1887 Bury moved to London, and lived in a brothel at 80 Quickett Street. It is here he met his wife Ellen, who, two years later in Dundee,he would murder. On 24th April 1889 he was hanged for that murder.

The claims that Bury could be the Ripper began in the newspapers shortly after his arrest for Ellen's murder, and there have since been books and articles published claiming that Bury was the Ripper.

Who knows the truth? No one, and I suspect we shall never know the Ripper's identity.
But sometimes, sitting in my coverted cellar writing my stories, I think maybe, just maybe...

Ken :)
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Offline fire-fly

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #41 on: November 08, 2011, 06:37:54 PM »
Ken you live in a delightful looking street and the history, woo hoo. Thanks for relaying that to us mate.  :D
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Offline midnight candle

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #42 on: November 08, 2011, 07:11:41 PM »
I've lived in Gloucester for 43 years and seen a lot of changes here. I worked abroad for a while back in the 90s and only appreciated how much I love the city when I returned home. Would I live anywhere else - no way.

On the bad side, it was home to two of the worst serials killers in British history - Fred and Rose West, but I won't bore you with details that most of you already know. The bad side is always portrayed in the news so I thought I'd post a picture of the remembrance garden on the site of 25 Cromwell Street. It's a sobering little walk and I go through it when I walk to the town centre. Having lived here, I know some of the victim's families and it pays respect to them.


Offline midnight candle

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #43 on: November 08, 2011, 07:13:50 PM »
On the good side, there is Gloucester Cathedral which is absolutely stunning and almost a 1000 years old. It makes me wonder why builders are so crap these days  ::)

Offline thatollie

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Re: Local Pictures. Anyone care to join in?
« Reply #44 on: November 08, 2011, 07:14:43 PM »
On the good side, there is Gloucester Cathedral which is absolutely stunning and almost a 1000 years old. It makes me wonder why builders are so crap these days  ::)

Cos then they can charge for repairs.
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