Author Topic: BAIT - Has anyone written a book in 28 days?  (Read 5858 times)

Dale Rhodes

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Re: BAIT - Has anyone written a book in 28 days?
« Reply #15 on: February 02, 2006, 07:52:56 PM »
Hello gub200

I wrote my novel, Blondie and the Beasty-girl, in 21 days. (75,000 words)
It started with a simple fantasy one night. It was a good one ;) so I got up the next morning and wrote it out, then that night expanded on it to the next scene. Each night for 21 days I would work out the action and dialogue in my mind, then get up the next morning and write it.
Blondie and the Beasty-girl is now at the publishers and scheduled for a release sometime late this summer.



Offline gub2000

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Re: BAIT - Has anyone written a book in 28 days?
« Reply #16 on: February 03, 2006, 10:11:47 AM »
Dale, Congradulations on the book. That's great to hear.

A follow up question for you: Did you follow Nick's guideline on making a blueprint or was it more of an "idea hemohage"?

gub2000
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Dale Rhodes

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Re: BAIT - Has anyone written a book in 28 days?
« Reply #17 on: February 03, 2006, 12:49:16 PM »
gub2000,

I don't know nick or anything about his book, although I've hear several references to it in this forum.
Blondie and the Beasty-girl was a 'nightly-idea-hemorrhage'. It just wouldn't stop. It unfolded in my mind every night like watching a movie, then every morning I would get up and write what I had seen. It had to be the most free-flowing, effortless thing I'd ever written, which is why I've taken to doing all my creative development at night, lying in bed. I can go over scenes again and again (in my mind) in rapid fashion, changing whatever I want without the analytical pressure of viewing the words I've written. When I type a scene in the morning, I turn off my monitor so [that] analytical pressure doesn't slow down or interfere with getting the scene written. Then--I turn on the monitor and edit what I've written. Now I write three times as much text in a day as I used to, and the quality of my writing has improved greatly.
I know this method is probably not suitable for everybody (and it helps that I have a near-perfect memory, so once I fix a scene in my head it stays), but that's how I did it.
Dale

Offline gub2000

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Re: BAIT - Has anyone written a book in 28 days?
« Reply #18 on: February 03, 2006, 02:44:39 PM »
>> I turn off my monitor so [that] analytical pressure doesn't slow down or interfere with getting the
>> scene written.

Dale, this sounds like a cool idea. I'm going to try it.

gub2000
Don't ever ever give up - Winston Churchill

www.TheBestofYouTube.com - editor

Dale Rhodes

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Re: BAIT - Has anyone written a book in 28 days?
« Reply #19 on: February 03, 2006, 04:14:47 PM »
gub2000,

If you're going to try it--a word or two of advice, if I may.

I'm not daydreaming, or fantasizing, I'm working. This means structured, focused effort towards a single goal. Concentrate on one small scene.

I believe I follow the same steps one normally would to write a piece (outline, draft, re-write, etc.), and I don't move from one step to the next until I'm satisfied with what I've done. Build it slowly from the general to the specific.

Finally, I 'read' the scene in my mind as if I'm reading it to an audience. If I stumble on a phrase, or a word, or it sounds hollow or contrived, I go back and re-work that section. Take your time.

I know all this sounds very esoterical, but the mind is an enormous playground of creative potential. It's my analytical brain that gets in the way of tapping that potential. Play/work in the sandbox and have some fun.

Dale

P.S. When I type my scene for the first time (monitor off), I don't worry about capitalization, or quotation marks, or paragraphs, or hitting the return, or anything really except getting it out of my mind and into the real world. I type into a notepad.txt file, so what I end up with is one continuous block of text. If I type something and it doesn't sound right, or I think of a better way to say it while I'm typing, I just hit--xxx--and retype it. I never turn on the monitor and look at my words until I've finished the scene.
Sounds kinda stupid now that I read about it--but hey, it works for me.


Offline Mark with a k

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Re: BAIT - Has anyone written a book in 28 days?
« Reply #20 on: February 07, 2006, 04:55:59 PM »
That's a neat system Dale has developed, stream of consciousness, a creative vent, call it what you will, the point is, nothing distracts.

A couple of questions though, Dale.

As youíre in flow, does the tempo of your keyboard input gradually assume a cadence that leaves you exhausted, like a concert pianist having wrestled Beethovenís ghost?

Have you ever pounded out a scene only to discover when you turn your monitor on, the computer was off the whole time too?

Iíve experienced the latter myself. Please tell me Iím not the only person on the planets to have done it!


Mark

Dale Rhodes

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Re: BAIT - Has anyone written a book in 28 days?
« Reply #21 on: February 07, 2006, 06:09:50 PM »
"Have you ever pounded out a scene only to discover when you turn your monitor on, the computer was off the whole time too?"

Ha ha ha ha ha! That had me laughing out loud!
No, thank God! But I type into an un-named blank .txt file, and once I typed a 3,000 word scene, turned my monitor on, right-clicked to rename it, then clicked delete instead! I sat there for five minutes, staring at the blank screen thinking, I don't believe I did that--I don't believe I did that.
And then I remembered that annoying little screen that always comes up when you close a file that says, 'Do you want to save the changes?' I held my breath, closed the file, clicked 'no'--then re-opened the file and...PRAISE GOD AND THANK YOU BILL GATES!!! My text was restored. Whew!

Dale