Author Topic: Writing classes  (Read 1490 times)

Offline millerj81

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Writing classes
« on: July 28, 2006, 11:12:46 PM »
Are taking writing classes any good? I have been doing some research about them. Are they worth the money? Do they improve your skills enough? Is one genre in writing better than another. The reason I am asking is that I have an idea for a children's book, but I have no idea how to go about writing it. Any suggestions?
Here's to the dream of publishing, and the passion of writing.
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Offline Tyger

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Re: Writing classes
« Reply #1 on: July 30, 2006, 06:03:47 PM »
It depends on what you are looking for.

I took some classes on creative writing just to wake up my muse. It did help me and the classes were inexpensive.

If you need style and grammar work, you could probably benefit from a more in-depth class like a "good writing" or "great writing" type class.

if you're trying to delve into a new genre, you might benefit, but reading in that genre may help you more, as long as it doesn't stifle your creativity.

There are classes specifically tailored to writing children's literature. Ed2Go has one, I think, but you can probably google up a few.

The benefit of classes, if they are presented well: You may find your unique voice. Online classes usually have discussion boards, where students share their ideas and work.

You will find much of that sharing here as well and some of our "elders" have a wealth of information to share.

Tyger

Offline millerj81

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Re: Writing classes
« Reply #2 on: July 30, 2006, 10:51:07 PM »
Thanks for the advice. Maybe I will do some searching for classes.  If there is any other advice you want to fling at me, go ahead. :)
Here's to the dream of publishing, and the passion of writing.
www.noboundaryopinion.com

Offline Tyger

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Re: Writing classes
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2006, 11:16:12 PM »
I guess my other advice would be to just start writing.
You'd be surprised what wonderful stuff might be inside you, waiting to come out.

 :)  :)  :)

Offline Faith

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Re: Writing classes
« Reply #4 on: July 31, 2006, 07:43:37 PM »
Some writing classes are more expensive than others, so by all means you should shop around and compare prices. I tend to trust writing instructors who send out regular newsletters. The newsletters may give you some idea of the level of professionalism and insight you might expect to get if you take their class.

I think taking writing classes are worth it, especially if the class focuses on a particular genre. You could learn things about writing, and writing for that genre that you would not have learned otherwise, and may also get other information about the publishing industry in general, or the industry for that particular genre, about getting published, etc.

I once took an online writing class offered by Rob Parnell. His website is http://easywaytowrite.com, or email rob@easywaytowrite.com. I found the class to be immensely informative and I don't regret having taken it. Being able to ask the instructor questions is also a plus.

Or you can always buy books on writing. Writers Digest offers many of those.

The reason I am asking is that I have an idea for a children's book, but I have no idea how to go about writing it. Any suggestions?
You might want to take a writing class for that particular genre.  ;)

Faith
"The act of putting pen to paper encourages pause for thought, this in turn makes us think more deeply about life, which helps us regain our equilibrium." Norbert Platt

Offline aelfwin

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Re: Writing classes
« Reply #5 on: August 05, 2006, 09:40:51 AM »
I've taken about a half dozen online writing classes and found them all to be of value. Those classes, plus the invaluable critiques I've had from sites like this one, led to my first published short story. I have recently been writing lots of children's stories so I decided to take a class. After doing some research, I chose the Institute of Childrens Literature as a promising school. It's a bit more expensive than most and is a two year course (but can be completed sooner) and offers college credits if one wants that. It is not an online classe, although they have a website. Everything is handled by snailmail which, in my opinion, is a great way to practice sending manuscripts to publishers. My instructor for this course is Stephen Roos. He is a published author of childrens books. The school has a large staff and also has an entry exam. I was a little taken aback by this aspect because so many of theses tests are just come-on's to get one to join. In my research on the web, however, I found that people actually do get turned down by this school. Any way, I'm part of it and will have more to report as I work my way toward a diploma. In the meantime I'm writing and sending manuscrips to publishers. It's a great way to collect rejection slips ;D Aelf

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“It was a dark and stormy night. Suddenly a scream pierced the air’….Good writing takes enormous concentration.” Charles Schulz (1922-2000)

Offline millerj81

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Re: Writing classes
« Reply #6 on: August 05, 2006, 10:47:10 PM »
Thanks for the info. I was looking to one of those writing classes through the mail that help you get published. They are supposed to be sending me info on it in the mail. I too have an interest in writing Children's books. That's why I want to take the class, I know that writing Children's literature is soo much different than writing for adults.
Here's to the dream of publishing, and the passion of writing.
www.noboundaryopinion.com

Offline aelfwin

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Re: Writing classes
« Reply #7 on: August 06, 2006, 09:47:39 AM »
Yeah, you can say that again, but IMHO, it's a least as much fun as writing fantasy for adults, and contains a much larger reading audience... Aelf ;D

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"Critics are a dissembling, dishonest, contemptible race of men. Asking a working writer what he thinks of critics is like asking a lampost what it feels about dogs." - John Osborne