Author Topic: How do you improve on your writing?  (Read 9878 times)

Lin

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Re: How do you improve on your writing?
« Reply #60 on: December 10, 2010, 03:19:16 AM »
And after all this there is one thing we forgot (I think) Don't worry about your writing. Just do it and see what comes out.  There is always someone who will leeerrve what you have written and some who hate it.  Does it really matter? You are you - and unique. This is about improving as you go along, learning from your mistakes. Just do it, don't try to be what you are not.  Each written word is unique to the mind of the writer. That's what being a writer is all about.  Just read up about "How to Write."  Understand the formula for writing a novel. Go for it. There are plenty of people around who know about these things and can help you to improve as you go along. Anyway what started as a hobby for me turned into reality.  My book is on the  final readthrough before the big submission.  (I hope.  It all depends on what the agent says and how they want me to change it again for the umpteenth time.) Katie Fforde told me at the RNA Winter Party, a few weeks ago,  that it took her eight years to get published and now she has about 30 novels to her name. So if you keep plugging away and get in with all the right people you are bound to catch someone's eye.   Don't expect the world to come to you.  You have to go out there and tell the world you exist.  Most of us are not good at doing that, afraid to tell the world we exist.

As much as my late Mum and I were not close, I discovered how much she had pushed herself forward over the last seventy years. (She was 88)   Whilst clearing out her house I found tons of photos of her with Jimmy Nail, Leslie Crowther, David Jacobs, Sir Lawrence Olivier and many more. I found letters from Gracie Fields, Sir Patrick Moore, Joanna Lumley -   Mum was an actress on TV as well as a dancer, teacher, artist and until the day she died at the age of 88 she ran an amateur film production company. She never stopped pushing and she got there in the end.

Lin x
(Glad to be back home!)

Offline WordBird

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Re: How do you improve on your writing?
« Reply #61 on: December 10, 2010, 11:48:41 AM »
Lin,

I am thrilled to see you back home and back to giving your fantastic advice to other writers!!

Best,
D

Lin

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Re: How do you improve on your writing?
« Reply #62 on: December 11, 2010, 05:05:05 AM »
Thanks Wordy,

I dont think it would have got this far if it wasn't for the members of MWC.  I have learned so much in the last five years.  But I do reiterate the importance of getting out there and finding out as much information as you can, not just about writing but how to market yourself as a writer.

Dont be scared - feel the fear and do it anyway.  I have this lovely friend who has a book published - non-fiction.  She has now embarked on a novel. She is so protective of her work I do hope she can let go of it.  She now tells me she has completed it.  She won't allow a single soul to give her feedback, I dont know if that's a good thing or a bad thing.  Perhaps as part of this thread we could expand on that question.

Lin x

Offline JewelsofJapan

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Re: How do you improve on your writing?
« Reply #63 on: December 22, 2010, 03:14:05 PM »
I have read all your commentaries on improving writing skills and resign to the fact that there is a legionary pillar of excellence that inspires writers to be remembered while reaching out.

However, to Draw that richly patterned tapestry that has woven the many stray threads of literature sometimes might be wise to encourage shared skills.

I mean to say, according to a Norwegian scholar, there is reasonable doubt in his findings to suggest that Shakespeare, had his work written.

Point being to have a great concept is the start to either proceed alone or introduce whatever  it takes to achieve opulence and beguile the general reader. 
Jewelsofjapan,

Jewels of life's profound purpose are to believe.

Offline HPvD

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Re: How do you improve on your writing?
« Reply #64 on: December 24, 2010, 07:08:05 AM »
I don't think that our society really wants us to be ourselves.

For example I think that - because it's commercially easier for the trade - to with media attention 'convince' people, to only buy the top 10 bestsellers they want you to buy. The same with all kinds of other politics etc. etc. (btw now with on line shops, and other less traditional media, this might change)

Anyway,

I do think that Blogging can be a great way to keep the 'Writing Engine' running and also can be an excellent way to be able to send 'Prototypes' of your writing into the world to get feedback.

All the Best,
To your - Writing - Inspiration,
HP

 

   

To your Happy<i> - Writing -</i> Inspiration, http://hpshappywriting2.blogspot.com

Offline JewelsofJapan

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Re: How do you improve on your writing?
« Reply #65 on: December 24, 2010, 10:56:14 AM »
To be able to listen before we speak is the essence of perfect convocation, but how often does that occur, I mean, in most passing convocation. People hear one sentence, and boom. They have taken over. As, if everything in life is a competition.  Point being, there's not much difference between personalities sharing weakness and strengths in the verbal or the written, but we can express ourselves  more whole, in the written enabling us to change our view points as we speak and a perfect learning curve to enhance our weaknesses.
Jewelsofjapan,

Jewels of life's profound purpose are to believe.

Offline tradecraft

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Re: How do you improve on your writing?
« Reply #66 on: December 27, 2010, 06:57:30 AM »
To improve my writing, not necessarily my witing overall but a particular piece, I will often write the parts that are most exciting to me first, be it in the middle or toward the end, then go back to the beginning and try to thump out a great hook to get the reader. Once I've got it all down, I print it off and read it critically, then perhaps re-write parts.

Another resource I use are essays and tutorials on writing like Orwell's Politics and the English Language to stop my writing from becomming sludge. I will write with that in mind - not always something I would like to publish but as an exercise.