Author Topic: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression  (Read 9175 times)

Offline LRSuda

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2010, 11:56:53 AM »
LOL, cs. Yeah, that one could have used more work.  ;)

It just seems to me that Linda hit on an important point.

But I want to come off it. I don't want to chat with a man in the chemist while he hands over my prescription of anti-depressants. I don't want him to look at my children with pity in his eyes.

Despite our living in the Information Age, there remains a stigma attached to mental illness that is held, not only by a good percentage of the GP, but also by some folks who should know better. Linda's chemist, to me, seems an example of the latter. It's difficult enough to go through a depressive episode, or live with an illness that causes constant physical pain, as Lin had mentioned. How much more difficult is it made by the funny looks or careless comments of those who make judgements without first having the information?

Lisa     

Offline cswillson

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2010, 01:26:20 PM »
The real problem with depression is it gives one a false impression of the world, and an egocentric view of every perception.

For instance:

 I don't want him to look at my children with pity in his eyes.

Most likely he's not, it's your perception, clouded by the depression. It could well be he has self pity in his eyes because his children aren't nearly so cute.
C.S.

FWIW, YMMV, EIEIO

Offline eric

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #17 on: August 07, 2010, 03:13:11 PM »
Oh, so that is the real problem with depression?

Offline cswillson

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #18 on: August 07, 2010, 05:21:13 PM »
Oh, so that is the real problem with depression?

What's your opinion?
C.S.

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Offline LRSuda

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #19 on: August 07, 2010, 06:48:11 PM »
I don't know that I'd go so far as to say egocentric, cs. Distorted, no argument. Egocentric, could be; but the connotation seems a bit too strong to me. Linda very aptly described what a depressive episode feels like. She also hit upon the prejudices and stigmas regarding mental illness that, sadly, still remain in our supposedly enlightened society. And, I'm sorry, but I just cannot believe that EVERYONE is, to one degree or another, suffering some form of mental illness or other illnness; on that, I'd have to see the hard and proven stats. The stigmas are out there. Ignorance is out there. And just because a person may be in a distorted state of perception does not mean everything they see and experience is distorted.

Linda, kudos. You were brave enough to start a topic that, in my opionion is a very important and worthy of discussion.

Lisa   

Offline eric

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #20 on: August 07, 2010, 06:59:55 PM »
I think that depression does not "give" one a false sense of the world or a distorted and egocentric view of things.  Some of the most compassionate people I know of, Abe Lincoln being a prime example, have been depressed.  Some of the clearest thinkers that I know have also been depressed.  Not always clear, but often.  Depression is a universe, and it is difficult to understand how you can make judgments about it from the outside.  It is also epidemic in our generation and the ones following it, but czech was quite wrong to say many people feel like this "at some point."  Depression is not a bad mood, it is a clinical illness that lasts a long time and does not go away.  It can be managed by drugs and therapy, but not cured.  It affects people's interactions with the world, but I would say it does not enforce a false sense of reality except in schizoaffective moments.  I cannot say it makes people egomaniacs.  Feeling sorry for oneself can do this, but that is not depression to my knowledge.

« Last Edit: August 07, 2010, 07:15:38 PM by eric »

Offline LRSuda

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #21 on: August 07, 2010, 07:38:10 PM »
Having gone through quite a few depressive episodes, eric, I have to say that there is a distortion of perception that occurs. But, maybe distortion of perception holds the wrong connotations, too. When in a deep depression it is just hard to convince yourself that the people around you-- and I don't mean snotty chemists-- aren't ashamed of you, don't dislike you, that you're kids don't wish they had a different mommy, and on and on and on. So, maybe it's projection more than anything else. I don't know; I'm not an expert. It just seems to me Linda started a topic that warrants much discussion.

Lisa

Offline eric

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #22 on: August 07, 2010, 07:52:31 PM »
I agree with what you said, Lisa.  There are also other times when depression is managed or contained, and there are also kinds of cognitive thinking that do not necessarily suffer the same as far as I know.  I could work depressed, for example, at least to an extent.  I just snapped people's heads off.  Same as now, except now I am not snapping.

Here, I was drawing a distinction between a flawed view of the world itself (a la schizophrenia, in which you see the analyst as a pig) and the more or less manageable difficulty in dealing with it.  And of course, medication can help one cope also.  So yes there are varying degrees of distortion, and there are also varying degrees of clarity.  The comment I was responding to did not allow for that variation.  

Like yours.  Your experience of depression might be different than mine, I think this is normal.  They are not susceptible to absolutes, I am sure you would agree.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2010, 08:20:45 PM by eric »

Offline LRSuda

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #23 on: August 07, 2010, 08:30:31 PM »
Definitely agree.  But, where's Linda? It would be nice to hear her take on all this.

Lisa

Offline cswillson

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #24 on: August 07, 2010, 09:23:10 PM »
Eric, brother, calm down.

Eric: So yes there are varying degrees of distortion, and there are also varying degrees of clarity.  The comment I was responding to did not allow for that variation. 

We are in agreement, my comment allows for any variation you care to choose:

C.S.: Mental illness is not a condition that makes one different from another. It is a continuum, we all have it in one degree or another in one area or another, the only difference is how far from the center of the bell shaped curve we are.

We are both human, we both have the same chemical processes to make life possible, but those chemicals are present in different quantities and/or at different times.

You used the term egomaniacal, I didn't.
C.S.

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Offline LRSuda

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #25 on: August 07, 2010, 09:30:19 PM »
We're writers. Aren't we all a tad egomaniacal? But, then, according to the stereotype, most of us are off-kilter alchoholics, too.

 ;D

Offline cswillson

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #26 on: August 07, 2010, 09:38:51 PM »
We're writers. Aren't we all a tad egomaniacal? But, then, according to the stereotype, most of us are off-kilter alchoholics, too.

 ;D

Stereotype? I thought it was the norm.
C.S.

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Offline LRSuda

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #27 on: August 07, 2010, 10:13:12 PM »
Ain't gonna touch that. Nor will I say anymore. I already feel guilty of hijacking.

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #28 on: August 08, 2010, 07:36:25 AM »
Not sure if this has been said in this thread before (It's been a while since I read the earlier posts here), but just in case: We're talking about clinical depression here.

There's a chemical disbalance in the brain of the depressed, although I think it still remains to be seen whether this causes the depression or is caused by the depression itself. The fact remains, however that the chemical disbalance is responsible for many of the symptoms of depression, and if you manage to restore the chemical balance, the depressed person will feel better.

Also, it's worthwhile to know, that medication (anti-depressants) will only work for those who are indeed clinically depressed. They don't work any better than a placebo for those who are suffering from the things life throws at them. 


It can be managed by drugs and therapy, but not cured.  

I don't completely agree with that, Eric. You'd be right in saying that in most cases depression cannot be cured, but there certainly are people who get clinically depressed only once in their whole lives, recover from their depression and never once hit a depression again.

I don't think that happens often, though, but don't have any clinical data handy about that. It is my personal feeling, however, that many of us who get clinically depressed, suffer from recurring depressions. They come and go, for no particular reason.


It affects people's interactions with the world, but I would say it does not enforce a false sense of reality except in schizoaffective moments.

I agree with that.


Here, I was drawing a distinction between a flawed view of the world itself (a la schizophrenia, in which you see the analyst as a pig) and the more or less manageable difficulty in dealing with it.

Hey, for all you know, the analyst could well be a pig!  ;)  ;D

Seriously, there's quite a difference between the distorted worldview of someone suffering from depression, and the distorted sense of reality of a person suffering from schizophrenia. Sure, a depressed person may experience psychotic moments, or even worse, the depression might turn into a psychotic depression, but as logn as we're talking "ordinary" clinical depression, the patient's sense of reality remains essentially intact.

Offline cswillson

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Re: My name's Linda and I suffer from depression
« Reply #29 on: August 09, 2010, 09:56:48 PM »
It's not a state of mind, i.e., it's not something you can will to change. Been through a grandmother, mother, two daughters and self and I know for sure it's not a choice.
C.S.

FWIW, YMMV, EIEIO