Author Topic: Outshone vs. outshined  (Read 38924 times)

Offline kk

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Outshone vs. outshined
« on: March 30, 2010, 07:08:57 AM »
Hi all,

I appreciate any advice you have to offer on this one. In the following sentence does the word
outshone work, or would it be better with oushined? Both words are correct in the
sentence, but does one sound better to you than the other? 

Thanks for your help.

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kk
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Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: Outshone vs. outshined
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2010, 07:17:14 AM »
Outshone has a softer ending to it so the context may decide which one is needed. Maybe...

Skip
« Last Edit: March 30, 2010, 07:28:59 AM by Skip Slocum »

Offline Foxy

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Re: Outshone vs. outshined
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2010, 07:18:06 AM »
I believe outshone is the correct past tense of outshine. I don't think outshined is a word.
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Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: Outshone vs. outshined
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2010, 07:24:02 AM »
My dictionary says OR, and has both spellings. However, outshined sounds clumsy to me.  

EDIT: FYI  My dictionary is: Webster's New World Dictionary & Thesaurus
« Last Edit: March 30, 2010, 08:54:11 AM by Skip Slocum »

Offline Hugh

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Re: Outshone vs. outshined
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2010, 07:55:29 AM »
I’ve never heard of outshined, and my OED doesn’t list it as a past tense of outshine, so it rather looks like another British/American English difference.

Hugh

PS I clicked the spell check for this post and it said that I've is wrong. Hey ho.

Offline A.J.B

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Re: Outshone vs. outshined
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2010, 07:57:11 AM »
Word web doesn't believe outshined is a word. I am inclined to agree purely due to the way it makes my eyes and mind scream in mental agony when I read it :/

Outshone, go with that :)
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Offline kk

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Re: Outshone vs. outshined
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2010, 08:33:07 AM »
Thanks all!  Outshone it is. 

kk
“We will open the book. Its pages are blank. We are going to put words on them ourselves. The book is called Opportunity and its first chapter is New Year's Day.”

                                                                            ~ Edith Lovejoy Pierce

Offline bonitakale

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Re: Outshone vs. outshined
« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2010, 09:11:59 PM »
"Shined," as far as I know, is transitive, used for flashlights, etc. "He shined the light around the attic." (Also, "He shined his shoes," but that's a different thing.)

"Shone," is intransitive, "The sun shone brightly."
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Offline M. Lewis

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Re: Outshone vs. outshined
« Reply #8 on: June 22, 2013, 06:18:58 PM »
"Shined," as far as I know, is transitive, used for flashlights, etc. "He shined the light around the attic." (Also, "He shined his shoes," but that's a different thing.)

"Shone," is intransitive, "The sun shone brightly."

You r quite funny and yes those are quite different in nature but there are some similarities as well.