Author Topic: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold  (Read 5215 times)

Offline eric

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #30 on: January 20, 2010, 03:04:14 PM »
Yay!!

Offline eric

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #31 on: January 20, 2010, 03:30:04 PM »
hm, didn't Caesar and Brutus use to be bosom buddies?  I heard that somewhere.  So isn't that sort of unrequited love, I mean, when his best bud stabs him to death in the Capitol in Rome?  Just a thought.
« Last Edit: January 20, 2010, 05:56:34 PM by eric »

Offline eric

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #32 on: January 22, 2010, 10:26:09 AM »
NINE DAYS LEFT

Get in on this historic competition!

Offline eric

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #33 on: January 22, 2010, 10:52:16 AM »
what is a bosom buddy anyway, i mean really, when you think about it?

Offline eric

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #34 on: January 23, 2010, 10:09:08 AM »
EIGHT DAYS LEFT, THREE SUBS IN, AND THE COMP IS HOT!

WOAH!
« Last Edit: January 23, 2010, 10:12:25 AM by eric »

Offline eric

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #35 on: January 23, 2010, 11:16:58 AM »
still eight days left ... get yours in while the getting's good!!!!!!!!

and keep working ... still have over a week to do one!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
« Last Edit: January 23, 2010, 12:02:42 PM by eric »

Offline hanabichan

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #36 on: January 23, 2010, 02:58:58 PM »
Poetry and love, both subjects that I am weak in...

Yet that Ghazal poem structure really raptured me and I want to try it so bad.  Ugh.

Also have to break out of cliche-land.

My head hurts...
Laziness has settled in, so no... it isn't purple.

Offline eric

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #37 on: January 23, 2010, 05:58:35 PM »
heh heh, there's always gangster love, tough love, roller coaster love, political assassinations, dog love, silly love, and glove love.


Offline hanabichan

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #38 on: January 23, 2010, 09:09:59 PM »
Woohoo, an inkling of an idea...  Now to get the imagery...  Can't help but read in awe at you folks who crank out wonderful poems left and right.  This stuff is very tough.
Laziness has settled in, so no... it isn't purple.

Offline eric

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #39 on: January 23, 2010, 09:17:01 PM »
Good luck, and I am sure you'll do just fine.


Offline eric

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Re: Hot Love Sneaking Into the Cold
« Reply #41 on: January 24, 2010, 08:35:28 PM »
Here are the rules again, and helpful hints on form.  Notice the last two paragraphs, reiterating stuff on rhyme.


In terms of style/form, there are two ways you can write this thing; choose one and one only.

First, if you wish to write without regard to forms, employ any freestyle manner you wish.

Second, if you choose to use a form, use a ghazal. This is pronounced “guzzle” or “ghuzzle” and is an ancient form (1500 years old) written in many languages of the Islamic world, primarily Urdu, Persian, Arabic, Hindi, and Turkic. I will explain formal standards below. Because this is unusual for us, anyone doing a ghazal according to the following standards will get two points added to their total.  No other forms will do, only a ghazal.

   *  The ghazal’s basic meanings are mystical and romantic. That is, romantic love and divine love in the code of romantic love, or something like it.  These can be very erotic.  

    *  A very interesting convention in some ghazals is to lament the love that can't be reached at the same time the poet expresses joy at the beauty of the futile quest -- saying there's nowhere they'd rather be.  That's the sort of thing I mean.

The ghazal’s form is differently defined in different cultures, but here is a simple version:

    * A ghazal has five or more (usually not more than fifteen) couplets.  Each couplet comes to a full stop at the end of the second line of the couplet, and is a complete little poem in itself.  No enjambment between couplets.  While each couplet is an independent poem, a continuous theme may develop and “jump” between couplets. Ours will be limited to between five and ten couplets.

    * Both lines of the first couplet have an internal rhyme and refrain. The second line of each succeeding couplet has the same refrain (repetition of words) and internal (not end) rhyme.  

Here is a really good example of a ghazal in English, by Agha Sahid Ali:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ghazal

...   He also has a book of ghazals for sale, which I intend to purchase. Sadly, he died some years ago.      

Summary and Rules:

1.   Theme:  Unrequited Love//Unobtainable Love  
2.   Put a fresh, new twist on the subject; avoid triteness and sad-sack moaning. Be sad if you want, but not sad-sack.
3.   For any poem, no less than 10 nor more than 20 lines, no more than 220 words. Any poems with excess verbiage shall be shot.  
4.   Can be either no-particular-form or (if form) a ghazal.  No sonnets, terza rimas, etc. A ghazal must have the above standard meaning and form.  If it does, it gets 2 extra points.
5.   One submitted poem per MWC personage.
6.   PM your entries to me
7.   Closing date 31 January 2010, 11:59:59 P.M. GMT; voting in workshop.
8.   Voting will be altogether, irrespective of forms or not, except for above bonus.
9.   On completion I will remove any poems from the list if requested so to do.
10.    Plagiarists need not apply.

A note on the rhyme.  As mentioned above, the first two lines have an internal rhyme about the same place in the latter part of each line.  The second line of each succeeding couplet has this same rhyme with the refrain.  This is not an end rhyme.  It precedes the refrain.

Some writers use other rhyme schemes for their ghazals, but this one is traditional and it's the one we're using.  The so-called bastard ghazals are yesterday's news.  Today's emphasis is on realness.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2010, 08:37:40 PM by eric »