Author Topic: A coffee-clutch discussion on: Too Many Descriptions  (Read 5036 times)

Offline thatollie

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Re: A coffee-clutch discussion on: Too Many Descriptions
« Reply #30 on: May 16, 2009, 11:49:32 AM »
Well maybe you delved deeper than the average reader would into a single sentence, but the information and assumptions are there.
Never make a decision standing up.

Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: A coffee-clutch discussion on: Too Many Descriptions
« Reply #31 on: May 16, 2009, 11:55:38 AM »
I think I'm getting your point but..isn't it the readers job to follow the story the writer unfolded, with all its secrets, clues, and jokes?
EDIT; and imagery

Offline thatollie

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Re: A coffee-clutch discussion on: Too Many Descriptions
« Reply #32 on: May 16, 2009, 12:07:34 PM »
But some can be left to the imagination, remember what EYE said in the other thread.
Never make a decision standing up.

Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: A coffee-clutch discussion on: Too Many Descriptions
« Reply #33 on: May 16, 2009, 12:17:28 PM »
 ;D

Offline Hypothesis

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Re: A coffee-clutch discussion on: Too Many Descriptions
« Reply #34 on: May 16, 2009, 10:17:18 PM »
I don't know if this...helps or just confuses but I was taught that you had to put yourself in the character's shoes. If you are stuck, sometimes you could write the section using 'I' so you think hard about what you, in character, would realistically notice/do. Like someone else mentioned, he isn't seeing his hand on the door so why should you say that? Or in the snake example, what would the woman care about more? The colouring of a potentially poisonous snake or the fact that someone used a six shooter to kill it? I write what they notice so it doesn't become overly wordy.

Pacing is different, its a balance between characterisation and plot. Fast pacing is plot moving forward, even if you are describing the cryptologist spending a long night deciphering a code, the plot is still moving. However, taking a swim to clear his head is slowing it down since nothing he is doing moves the story forward. I...think that makes sense?  :-[
"Waste not, want not. Work not, eat not. Laugh not, heal not. Write not, live not." ~Hypothesis

Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: A coffee-clutch discussion on: Too Many Descriptions
« Reply #35 on: May 17, 2009, 12:04:06 AM »
Ooo the pacing part makes great sense. That helps, I will remember this.


Offline Nancy Newsom

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Re: A coffee-clutch discussion on: Too Many Descriptions
« Reply #36 on: May 18, 2009, 07:14:39 PM »
For a while, I was  fan of Taylor Caldwell. But I realized that she spent so much time with description that I knew what the bug on the plant by the road was thinking, and it wasn't pertinent to the plot.

These days we have to move much more quickly to grab and hold the reader.

Show, don't tell. And show what's pertinent to the reader's perspective, not from yours.

I'm working on this.

Offline Skip Slocum

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Re: A coffee-clutch discussion on: Too Many Descriptions
« Reply #37 on: May 18, 2009, 08:39:53 PM »
My ears are burning on this one Leah, I'm not sure what to say. I feel its a trick.....ah, okay.
"The guy that use to be her stepbrother (folks got divorced or) got a tattoo near his personal area."
or "he is a she now."
 ???