Author Topic: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?  (Read 7375 times)

Wolfe

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Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« on: March 30, 2009, 02:59:52 AM »
I know this will open Pandora's box, but I skim through the screenwriter's forum every so often. So, I'm curious. Where's the logline for the scripts?

It's the first thing the agent asks and wants to see in the Hollywood pitch.

Just curious.

Wolfe
« Last Edit: March 30, 2009, 03:02:53 AM by Wolfe »

Offline ma100

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #1 on: March 30, 2009, 03:02:50 AM »
Well from my point of view Wolfe. I don't know what one of those is.  ??? ;)

Wolfe

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #2 on: March 30, 2009, 03:13:04 AM »
In novel writing terms, it's the hook or tagline.  The logline pitches the script to the agent or interested party. It also demands an ironic twist. Typically, it's the agent's first request.

I'll demonstrate.

An atheist family turns to the Roman Catholic Church to exorcise the demons in their new home and save their souls.

If you lack the pitch, you can forget about an agent even seeing the script.

Again, just curious because all scripts I read showed this on the front or first page to give the interested party the theme beforehand. Kind of ... expected, I thought.

Wolfe

Offline ma100

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #3 on: March 30, 2009, 03:23:51 AM »
I have to be honest, I was totally unaware of this Wolfe. Thanks for the information. :)

Wolfe

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2009, 03:45:24 AM »
Before I confuse and panic everyone, I mean the logline for the pitch. While outside the script's body, unlike the slug line or scene heading, they appear with a separate note posted with the draft and later used to pitch to an agent.

Again, just curious about their absence on the Script Board because they remain the first step before you write the script.
 
Wolfe
« Last Edit: March 30, 2009, 03:53:59 AM by Wolfe »

Offline thatollie

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #5 on: March 30, 2009, 03:57:54 AM »
Before I confuse and panic everyone, I mean the logline for the pitch. While outside the script's body, unlike the slug line or scene heading, they appear with a separate note posted with the draft and later used to pitch to an agent.

Again, just curious about their absence on the Script Board because they remain the first step before you write the script.
 
Wolfe


It's the same as asking why people often leave out taglines on the prose board.
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Wolfe

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #6 on: March 30, 2009, 04:06:16 AM »
Interesting.

Yet, sometimes the fiction posters do ... though indirectly. Often the writers there will tell you what their story presents. They do this at the top, before the story starts.

Same principle, but again perhaps more rough draft than anything.

Just an observation, but I noted few if any scripts present this. Instead, I read musing beforehand and little about the script's theme or purpose ... if anything.

Maybe I'm just telling on myself at this point...

Wolfe
« Last Edit: March 30, 2009, 04:12:30 AM by Wolfe »

Offline thatollie

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #7 on: March 30, 2009, 04:12:32 AM »
If I ever post a script, I promise to include my logline.

But now I must leave because my computer wants to rest.
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Wolfe

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2009, 04:18:52 AM »
Well, I'll leave it alone.   ;)  But, I'll say this much: it was the first line I co-wrote, and the first line the agent and producer wanted to read from the script. If they hated it, they read nothing else.

And in that first attempt ... they tossed it.

Yeah, big ouch.  :(

Anyway, might want to suggest this for the future scriptwriters on the board. Hope I avoided any sensitive toes with this question. :)

Just my humble opinion.

Wolfe
« Last Edit: March 30, 2009, 04:33:43 AM by Wolfe »

Offline sonofdenis

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #9 on: March 30, 2009, 09:22:29 AM »
So rather than introducing a piece on a thread with a bland 'please review my work - it's about a disfuntional family torn apart by their wayward father', introduce it as we'd open our synopsis/query letter IE DAVID JONES took the descision to stop his life of crime the day baby JOHNNY found the gun in his toybox.  But it was too late.

Is this what you mean?

LinRobinson

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #10 on: March 30, 2009, 10:54:03 AM »
No need for a logline on a forum.

Anybody interested in loglines should probably start a thread for people to post loglines for crit.

Wolfe

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2009, 03:49:10 PM »
No need for a logline on a forum.

Anybody interested in loglines should probably start a thread for people to post loglines for crit.

I must say I disagree and find the dismissal disturbing. If it helps the reviewers and writers clarify the project, especially since required for screenwriters, I would think it would be perfect on a forum that teaches and reviews screenwriting.

Bear in mind, it appears most screenwriters on the forum lack knowledge about the logline as a rule rather than the exception. To continue to keep this knowledge and requirement from them sounds silly.

If fellow posters started to insist and use the logline before the script, it sets a standard for the screenwriters later demanded from the agents and producers.

After all, how can one more line to clarify the proposal hurt? We should promote a practice required from the target audience, right?  :)

Just my humble opinion.

Wolfe
« Last Edit: March 30, 2009, 04:20:31 PM by Wolfe »

LinRobinson

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #12 on: March 30, 2009, 04:19:43 PM »
Do you really think I, or presumably anybody, is going to do something on "insistence from fellow posters"?

Is that how things work here?   Somebody decides it would be good to have something so it gets insisted on and anything else is "disturbing dismissal"?

There are lots of sites out there that deal exclusively with scripts and are populated by professional and near-professional writers, as well as pro readers and such: several are run by major star writers.  I have been on most of them.  Nobody insists on loglines for a script placed online.   and if somebody said they needed to do it, they'be get hooted at.  Trust me on that.

My feeling:  anybody interested in loglines do what the screenwriting sites do.  Have a forum thread for critiquing loglines.

I mean if it's OK to say that.

Wolfe

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #13 on: March 30, 2009, 04:30:05 PM »
I find new trends, when first suggested, hear dismissal. The old guard resists change. Yet, later, when they enter standard, everyone wonders why they took so long to see use.

For example, on forum posts, we now ask our fiction writers to break text blocks into manageable material with white space. Before, many balked. Some still do. Yet we suggest, not insist, on white space if you want a majority to read it.

Another example, if I started to use a certain technique in my responses, and they work, you will find people will copy my example and follow suit.

Like when I critique, you'll see my fellow posters will do the same.

Like when I critique (consider: review), you'll (good contraction use) see my fellow posters (consider: peers) will do (consider: may) the same (consider: copy the style).

Like when I review, you'll see my peers may copy the style.

And change slowly happens.

No one forces anyone on this board.  But, if we ask and set the example, others will follow suit. Just because the idea differs from the norm, right now, no one should dismiss it.

Standards today will change tomorrow.

Trust me.

Wolfe
« Last Edit: March 30, 2009, 04:50:36 PM by Wolfe »

Offline Alice, a Country Gal

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Re: Scriptwriters: Where's Your Logline?
« Reply #14 on: March 30, 2009, 04:49:20 PM »
No need for a logline on a forum.

Anybody interested in loglines should probably start a thread for people to post loglines for crit.

Lin, look at the title of the thread and the person who started it; I think that is exactly what he did.

from Wolfe:
Quote
Bear in mind, it appears most screenwriters on the forum lack knowledge about the logline as a rule rather than the exception. To continue to keep this knowledge and requirement from them sounds silly.

I know little about screen writing, but, this sounds logical to me.

from Lin:
Quote
Do you really think I, or presumably anybody, is going to do something on "insistence from fellow posters"?

Is that how things work here?   Somebody decides it would be good to have something so it gets insisted on and anything else is "disturbing dismissal"?

I started to answer the questions above but before I could hit post, Wolfe had already answered it much as I would have.

from Wolfe:
Quote
No one forces anyone on this board.  However, if we ask and set the example, other will follow suit. Just because the idea differs from the norm, right now, one should not dismiss it.

The one thing I would have done different is: Just because the idea differs from the norm, right now, one should not dismiss it?
Use a question mark where Wolfe used a period.

This is so simple: Lin, if you do not want to explore the use of Loglines, the don't. No one will insist that you or anyone else do so.

If on the other hand, anyone wants to learn more about not only the craft of Screen Writing, but the business end as well, What's the problem in exploring it right here?

Seems like a sound idea to me.  But as I said, I'm not a screen writer.
 
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