Author Topic: Big Words  (Read 4084 times)

GondorianPrincess

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Re: Big Words
« Reply #30 on: February 08, 2009, 08:44:06 PM »
I am terribly sad that we don't find these words in the modern books we read these days.
I would love for it to be slipped in just to shake up my curiosity.

Offline eric

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Re: Big Words
« Reply #31 on: February 08, 2009, 09:12:14 PM »
Modern books contain all these words and more, Nilly.  Also books that are a little more than modern.  The bookstores and libraries are full of them.  Think of it as a quest ... see what odd words will turn up on p. 278 of Treasure Island, for example.

GondorianPrincess

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Re: Big Words
« Reply #32 on: February 08, 2009, 09:54:14 PM »
I meant books like Twilight and other ilk of that nature. *lol*

I love "Treasure Island" I should go read that agian, to re-visit childhood memories. *lol*

Offline Amie

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Re: Big Words
« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2009, 11:37:44 PM »
Exactly, you nailed it J - I'm impressed. In this instance, the author used it to describe the light cast by a bedroom lamp. But yes, it originates from painting. A beer for you, and I guess Eric deserves one too.  ;D 

I knew it!! I want a beer too. Although I learned it more specifically as being the deliberate contrast of light and dark in a painting - Humanities teacher used Rembrandt as an example (wish I remembered her name - she was fabulous).
"You do not need to leave your room. Remain sitting at your table and listen. Do not even listen, simply wait, be quiet still and solitary. The world will freely offer itself to you to be unmasked, it has no choice, it will roll in ecstasy at your feet." - Kafka

Orpheus

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Re: Big Words
« Reply #34 on: February 09, 2009, 11:55:16 AM »
Quote
I knew it!! I want a beer too. Although I learned it more specifically as being the deliberate contrast of light and dark in a painting - Humanities teacher used Rembrandt as an example (wish I remembered her name - she was fabulous).

That's an even better explanation Amie. Have a free beer on me.  :D

GondorianPrincess

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Re: Big Words
« Reply #35 on: February 09, 2009, 01:08:01 PM »
I was re-reading some children's books that I have collected for my future children's use when/if I have any. It is the series of young Jack Sparrow books by Rob Kid and in the 10th book "Sin's of the Father" the word "Egregious" makes an appearance.

These books are for very young childrn, simple and to the point, and so this word was found, I wa sterribly surprised because a) I knew it was there, and b) I was pleseantly surprised. I would hope that any of my children who read that would imediatly look it up at Dictionary.com or in a very good paper dictionary we might own. *lol*