Author Topic: What are you reading?  (Read 411431 times)

Offline Vienna

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #525 on: March 23, 2011, 04:35:23 PM »
Der Große Fall - Peter Handke

just started this latest novel by one of the great modern german language writers.
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Offline Andre Farant

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #526 on: March 23, 2011, 09:47:56 PM »
The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood

Offline Laura H

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #527 on: March 26, 2011, 02:24:12 PM »
The Flying Troutmans
Miriam Toews
“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.” ― Maya Angelou

“Don't be like the rest of them, darling.” ― Eudora Welty

Offline GoldenClock

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #528 on: March 26, 2011, 02:42:33 PM »
I just started A Thousand Splendid Suns by Khaled Hosseini yesterday. It's pretty good so far. :)

Offline Mara

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #529 on: March 26, 2011, 07:15:59 PM »
Mara here,
I have been reading The Dhammapada (Sayings of the Buddha).  Some are quiet lovely.

The quivering, wavering mind
Hard to guard, hard to check,
The sagacious one makes straight
Like a fletcher, an arrow shaft.

I like short reads. 

Offline herron

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #530 on: March 26, 2011, 07:54:12 PM »
Mysterious Stranger

by Mark Twain
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Offline thatollie

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #531 on: March 26, 2011, 08:04:52 PM »
Mysterious Stranger

by Mark Twain


I've never understood Twain's appeal. Don tried to explain but that just made it worse. Do you want to take a crack at explaining it?
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Offline herron

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #532 on: March 26, 2011, 08:16:10 PM »
I don't think I saw Don's explanation, but I'd like to.  :)

I like Twain (most of his stuff, anyway) because he was a good old-fashioned story teller. A lot of it sounds a bit quaint and dated today, just like the things by H.G. Wells and Edgar Rice Burroughs, but that shouldn't get in the way of a good story.  I think a good reader will become immersed in a good story and overlook the dated way of speaking. Kind of mentally updating it as they go.

I'm sure that doesn't help much.... ::)
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Offline thatollie

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #533 on: March 26, 2011, 08:20:54 PM »
Not really, I'm a fantastic reader. What I don't like about him is hat he makes really interesting ideas seem boring to me. Tom Sawyer nearly ruined graverobbing, murder and treasure for me. The story Don linked to was about a midget that knew all the MC's secrets and I still thought it was boring. That sort of story is exactly what I cut my first tooth on.
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Offline Andre Farant

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #534 on: March 26, 2011, 08:31:58 PM »
This might help a little in understanding (one reason) why Twain is so well regarded:

http://www.dansimmons.com/writing_welll/writing.htm

Just scroll down to the the "3) Huckleberry Finn" heading.

Like I said, it's just one reason and according to one guy (author Dan Simmons, and all of his "Writing Well" essays are escellent--those still available, anyway).

Offline herron

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #535 on: March 26, 2011, 08:32:35 PM »
I'm also a prolific reader. Just finished reading 24 novels since the first of February (an eclectic mix), and still found time to write 12 short stories and edit a book manuscript.

Cut my teeth on folks like Wells, Twain, Burroughs, Asimov, Heinlein. Was reading Dickens at nine. Enjoyed Hemingway and Faulkner. New stuff out there doesn't mean those earlier authors are any less worth reading (or re-reading) than the more contemporary ones.

I think you need the background of the earlier stuff to complete a literary education. You also need to read Homer, Sophocles, Aristotle and Plato, too - if only for the background of their influence on Western thought.

There I go ... playing professor again. Sorry if I seem like I'm ranting.  :-[

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Offline thatollie

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #536 on: March 26, 2011, 08:58:01 PM »
Andre: Thanks for the link, I'm a big fan of Simmons and may have read them before but rereading is good.

I'm also a prolific reader. Just finished reading 24 novels since the first of February (an eclectic mix), and still found time to write 12 short stories and edit a book manuscript.

Cut my teeth on folks like Wells, Twain, Burroughs, Asimov, Heinlein. Was reading Dickens at nine. Enjoyed Hemingway and Faulkner. New stuff out there doesn't mean those earlier authors are any less worth reading (or re-reading) than the more contemporary ones.

I think you need the background of the earlier stuff to complete a literary education. You also need to read Homer, Sophocles, Aristotle and Plato, too - if only for the background of their influence on Western thought.

There I go ... playing professor again. Sorry if I seem like I'm ranting.  :-[


I've read some Plato and Homer, haven't got around to Aristotle and Sophocles. I started early with Wells, Dickens, Verne and many older writers. I just don't get Twain.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2011, 10:30:20 PM by thatollie »
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Offline Laura H

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #537 on: March 26, 2011, 09:03:56 PM »
May I ask what part of the world you are from, Thatollie?
I ask because I do think Twain has a strong regional appeal.  He spoke the language of the mid-south and mid west (USA), if you ask me.  He was very much of a time, but also of a place and frankly the southern US hasn't changed so much in manner or mindset since Twain.  If he were writing today he would easily have fit in as a weekly feature in my local newspaper.
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“Don't be like the rest of them, darling.” ― Eudora Welty

Offline Michael Edits

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #538 on: March 26, 2011, 09:32:07 PM »
For Twain, I suggest starting with A Connecticut Yankee In King Arthur's Court.  I've read it more than once, and not because of the Bugs Bunny version.
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Offline Laura H

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #539 on: March 26, 2011, 09:47:11 PM »
^^ Bugs Bunny gave me an early appreciation of opera, among other things. 

kill the wabbit, kill the wabbit!

“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.” ― Maya Angelou

“Don't be like the rest of them, darling.” ― Eudora Welty