Author Topic: What are you reading?  (Read 420689 times)

Offline Vienna

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1095 on: July 19, 2012, 07:34:06 AM »
just finished "Mao-A Life" by Philip Short

a brilliant insight of a complicated person and of China.
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Offline Gayle

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1096 on: July 19, 2012, 05:17:59 PM »
wuthering heights - emily bronte
My favourite of the Bronte sister's novels. Everyone makes such a big deal over Charlotte, but I think that Emily was undoubtedly the most talented of the three. Sadly, she didn't live long enough to write a second novel.
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Offline Matt Walker

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1097 on: July 23, 2012, 03:42:30 PM »
Just finished Noughts and Cross by Malorie Blackman. Loved a lot of it, hated a lot of it - invoked very strong feelings, which I guess was the point. Disappointed in the ending, and thought the characters often acted in a manner I couldn't believe. Still thinking about it...
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Offline heidi52

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1098 on: July 23, 2012, 04:46:16 PM »
Ghostwalk by Rebecca Stott

Very interesting, I never knew Issac Newton was an alchemist...

Offline Michael Edits

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1099 on: July 23, 2012, 05:17:31 PM »
The Gods Themselves by Isaac Asimov, for the third time
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Offline Mastafrank

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1100 on: July 23, 2012, 07:57:17 PM »
Beyond the shadows by Brent Weeks

Offline Michael Edits

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1101 on: July 23, 2012, 08:03:23 PM »
Watership Down
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Offline MimiSpeike

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1102 on: July 24, 2012, 12:27:23 PM »
I love the way some of the nineteenth/eighteenth century authors wrote. I'm pretty sure publishing houses and literary agents would find it too 'flowery' these days, but I find it...well, charming I suppose. I'm currently attempting my own smuggling novel at the moment, but managing to avoid using flowery verse. I think...

Project Gutenberg is great. It feeds my desire for things Native American, highwaymen and anything containing brandy soaked smugglers. For free too, so charmed life indeed.

Daniel, I work the way you do. I'm writing an adventure set in the sixteenth century, with a lengthy sea-going episode. I know nothing - not-a-blessed-thing! - about ships. I am constantly on the prowl for nautical adventures that I can borrow from, terms and chatter in particular, to make it sound like I know what the hell I'm talking about. And I too love that flowery nineteenth century style, which fits perfectly with my period. I take it, and run with it, to the dismay of many, I'm afraid.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2012, 02:06:10 PM by MimiSpeike »

Offline Gayle

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1103 on: July 24, 2012, 07:29:58 PM »
What modern publishers call "flowery" is really just having a fully developed vocabulary. You can thank the minimalist craze in the early 20th century for our current predicament. The original idea was to pare down the language to make it more accessible to a wider group of readers. But the idea has been taken so far now that if a word has more than 2 syllables, publishers want to replace it with something shorter.
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Offline herron

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1104 on: July 25, 2012, 01:05:20 PM »
"Farewell Summer"

Ray Bradbury's last book.
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Offline midnight candle

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1105 on: July 25, 2012, 01:21:29 PM »
the sign of four

sir arthur conan doyle

Offline Daniel J. Pitcher

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1106 on: July 25, 2012, 04:09:59 PM »
Daniel, I work the way you do. I'm writing an adventure set in the sixteenth century, with a lengthy sea-going episode. I know nothing - not-a-blessed-thing! - about ships. I am constantly on the prowl for nautical adventures that I can borrow from, terms and chatter in particular, to make it sound like I know what the hell I'm talking about. And I too love that flowery nineteenth century style, which fits perfectly with my period. I take it, and run with it, to the dismay of many, I'm afraid.

Mimi- For plot reasons I have decided to have my smugglers not talking completely 'oldey worldey'. It also, I hope, helps with the pace. I'm of the opinion that these men were, largely, uneducated and illiterate folk who simply did not speak in the gentlemanly way that some of these older smuggling novels such as I am reading now would have us believe. Accordingly, for example, I am using coarser language than 'damned' in dialogue as I fully believe their language would have been pretty ripe. Sure, the people who funded the cargoes etc were educated men, quite often nobility, but the majority were coastal villagers and ex-servicemen living in poverty. Obviously though, writers in the 1800's were limited as to what language they could use. Even damned would often get hyphened out in the middle.

Having said that, I am having a certain amount of fun (probably more than is strictly healthy actually) with one character speaking in the 'flowery' vernacular of the time- again, for plot reasons.

I have a pretty decent working knowledge of the eighteenth century, having been fascinated by smugglers since I grew up on the Devon coast. I find it a fascinating century and it's always been my dream to write a novel set in it. I'm guessing you feel the same about the sixteenth century? Not my strong point, but I do know that the sheep skin smuggling owlers from that time were the predecessors of the 'gentlemen' of the next few centuries. I know, too, what you mean about ships...nautical terminology is not my strong point either! That Project Gutenberg should have plenty of free nautical novels to help you with 'terms and chatter.' Good luck with the story.

Gayle...excellent viewpoint, couldn't agree more. I used to enjoy reading thrillers, but started to find the three, four word sentences presumably designed for pace annoying.

'The night was sultry. Buchanan was tense. Too tense. Like a coiled spring. Pent-up and ready. Ready for violence. An explosion was imminent. A violent, bloody explosion. Buchanan hated sultry nights. Someone had to die.'

That kinda thing, but each to their own I suppose. Flowery can be refreshing.
« Last Edit: July 25, 2012, 04:12:30 PM by Daniel J. Pitcher »

Offline Michael Edits

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1107 on: July 25, 2012, 04:28:26 PM »
The Well and The Mine by Gin Phillips
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Offline Laura H

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1108 on: July 25, 2012, 04:40:07 PM »
A Walk in the Woods
Bill Bryson
“There is no greater agony than bearing an untold story inside you.” ― Maya Angelou

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Offline Tom 10

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Re: What are you reading?
« Reply #1109 on: July 25, 2012, 04:48:50 PM »
Quote
A Walk in the Woods
Bill Bryson
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