Author Topic: 1970's language  (Read 1080 times)

Lin

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1970's language
« on: August 27, 2017, 10:24:53 AM »
May I have your opinion on a query from my editor.

She has suggested that the following sentence may not have been used in the 1970's

'I've never seen you in your 'bezzie' clothes. Love the tie.'

The character is surprised and delighted that her date is wearing something nice for a change.  He always wears overalls, jeans and t-shirt.

Would you have used 'bezzie' as a twenty something person in the seventies?  She is trying to be friendly and complimentary. He smiles at her reply and is pleased she noticed him.

Lin

 

Offline Gyppo

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Re: 1970's language
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2017, 10:34:29 AM »
Not familiar to me, Lin.  Mind you, that doesn't mean other people may not have used it.  'Bezzie' sounds more modern to me.  I've only ever heard it used in the context of best friends, as in "She's my bezzie."

I can recall an occasional "Bloody hell, you scrub up nice."  Accompanied by an exaggerated up and down second look.  More usually not addressed directly to the person concerned, but as a question to a third party as in "Scrubs up well, doesn't he/she?"
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 10:41:44 AM by Gyppo »
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Lin

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Re: 1970's language
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2017, 10:58:17 AM »
Maybe just use 'posh clothes'

Lin

Jo Bannister

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Re: 1970's language
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2017, 02:53:24 PM »
I was a twenty-something person in the 1970s, and I never heard "bezzie" - and would have cut my throat with a blunt fish-knife rather than use it, then, now or anywhere in between.  Helpful?

Artemis Quark

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Re: 1970's language
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2017, 06:11:33 PM »
I was a twenty-something in the seventies and like Jo and Gyppo, never heard the word. Of course, I am in the U.S., not England so there are numerous words unique to both sides of the pond. Closest word I can think of, in this context, is "bestie" meaning "my best friend" but that word is more modern, a part of the texting world, e.g. BFF. The word bezzie sounds Aussie to me. Are any of your characters from down under?

AQ

Edit: how about "Sunday best"?
« Last Edit: August 27, 2017, 06:13:45 PM by Artemis Quark »

Lin

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Re: 1970's language
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2017, 04:31:03 AM »
Well my character is from Yorkshire, I used to use it and so did my family and friends.  However, if it's not in general use then ditch it!  I think you have answered my question - thanks. :D

Lin x

Offline hillwalker3000

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Re: 1970's language
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2017, 04:43:13 AM »
I'd never heard of it until more recently, when it's been adopted for phrases like 'bezzie mates', for example. So even if you used it in Yorkshire in the 70's, most readers would see it as an anachronism. I'd say best avoid it.

H3K

JewelAS53

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Re: 1970's language
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2017, 12:01:03 PM »
I was not 20 in the 70s, and in neither UK nor USA, and I have never ever heard Bezzie.

As I read the sentence, I stuttered a bit over the word then automatically converted it to 'You scrub up nice', per Gyppo.

Lin

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Re: 1970's language
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2017, 12:07:04 PM »
Yes, doing all that now.  Just wanted to run it by you chaps out there.

Lin  ;)

Offline Vienna

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Re: 1970's language
« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2017, 12:07:15 PM »
Never heard of it Lin. We certainly didnt use it in our area. Posh yeah, sunday best yeah.
Just a well-read punk peasant

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Lin

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Re: 1970's language
« Reply #10 on: August 28, 2017, 12:18:20 PM »
Thanks for the feedback