Author Topic: Sayings which we often use, but don't make sense if we stop to think about them.  (Read 9712 times)

Offline bri h

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To Jo. Very good. You had me till the end. Well done, funny Lady. xbx


Now that I'm working, I'd like to know the origin of (and I don't want to rock any future boats (and there's another)), I 'got the sack' from work. Or "We're sick of you, here's 'your cards'." Anyone know? B
Fare thee well Skip. We're all 'Keening' now. xbx

Offline Gyppo

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I know about the cards.  A worker had a card on which his employer stuck the weekly national insurance stamp. The self employed stamped their own card.  These were physical stamps, bought at the post office, which had to be moistened and stuck in place.   Now its all a matter of computer records, but the self employed can still take their national insurance demand into the post office, hand over cash, and have a rubber stamp on the form, which you then put in a safe place 'just in case'.

So when the boss gave you the push he 'gave you your cards'.   When you chose to leave you'd go to the pay office or wherever and say "Lick 'em and stick 'em, I'm on my way."  If the employer was a bit lax about keeping things up to date he might have to lick and stick several stamps.   especially if he was a shifty sod who saw your national insurance contributions as his money to play with.   Once they've got into the habit of dipping into that pot they find it very difficult to get back up to date.

Gyppo
« Last Edit: October 28, 2014, 03:49:05 PM by Gyppo »
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Offline Louise Thomas

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And the moral to be drawn from this is: You can't have your kayak and heat it.

That's awesome - thanks Jo. See now, that makes way more sense.

Jo Bannister

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Absolutely guessing here, Gyppo.  But in the pre-locker days, I wonder if employees kept their own tools and personal belongings in a sack hung from a nail at work.  Dissatisfied boss calls in disappointing worker, and hands him whatever he's owed and his sack.  Plausible?

Offline Gyppo

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It sounds plausible, Jo.  I can imagine the journeyman mason or whatever with his own personal tools in a bag and probably a single change of clothes.

I suppose the modern equivalent would be when someone walks into your office with a cardboard box or folding plastic crate and gives you two minutes to 'clear your desk' of personal belongings before being escorted off the premises.

I once worked for a man who would never let anyone give him a weeks notice, even if the parting was amicable enough.  He felt that someone serving their notice was less than committed and possibly a risk.  So once they announced their intention oif leaving he'd give them a weeks pay in lie of notice, an appropriate reference written there and then, and see them off.  They weren't even kept on until the end of the shift.
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Jo Bannister

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How about "As right as ninepence" - meaning, Fine and dandy.

Come to that, how about, "Fine and dandy"?

Offline Alice, a Country Gal

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All my life I've heard, "As right as rain."

Never gave it much thought until reading your post Jo.

Yes, sometimes rain is needed and can be considered "right." But like all things, too much of a good thing and/or receiving it at the wrong time isn't what we would likely call right or good.  :)
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Offline Soul Writes

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Been Googling "right as rain", and there is a fair sprinkling of theories. An interesting one is rooted in the origin of the word "right", an earlier meaning for it being "straight". In which case right as rain takes on a different perspective. All pretty speculative from what I've seen, but interesting. Plenty of other theories seem to abound.
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