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All the Write Questions / Re: Punctuating dialogue
« Last post by PIJ1951 on Today at 06:06:20 AM »
A simple reply to a simple query:

Example 1    "We need to work out the arrangements." he said, "Maybe you can help."

This is incorrectly punctuated unless you intended writing He said, "Maybe you can help." as a new sentence all on its own. I imagine what you meant to write was what we have in Example 3 which is correctly punctuated.

Quote
Ex 1 is the way I've been punctuating most of my dialogue. It was pointed out to me however, that I shouldn't have the full stop after ’arrangements’ as the sentence doesn't end until after ’he said’.
That's exactly right.

Quote
I've also been told to only have a comma after the attribution.
You've been given wrong information. It all depends on the context (see above).

Quote
But what if I want to start a new sentence, as in Ex 3? If I only have a comma, do I use a capital letter as in Ex 3 or can I place a period after the attribution? (also as in Ex 3)
If the second line of dialogue is a new sentence then you place a full stop after the initial attribution then begin the new sentence with a capital letter.

If in doubt, pick up a book by an established writer and see how they handle dialogue. It's not that complicated.


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All the Write Questions / Re: Quotation marks
« Last post by PIJ1951 on Today at 05:56:00 AM »
Cormac McCarthy never uses quotation marks for dialogue. That doesn't make him a bad writer - far from it. But you have to understand the rules in order to be able to break them. Sloppy punctuation is as inexcusable as sloppy spelling.
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The Writers Circle / Re: sir arthur conan doyle is the best ?
« Last post by Olesia on Today at 05:42:47 AM »
Hey Freja1793,

Welcome to My Writers Circle, we appreciate you sharing your passion to Arthur Conan Doyle!

To make things more personal we would love to learn more about you, please post an intro on the Welcome Board. Let us know what part of the world you're in, some background on your writing journey and how you found us.

Looking forward to having you as part of the community!
Olesia
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The Writers Circle / Sale of my Entrepreneur Writer blog
« Last post by Nick on Today at 05:26:06 AM »
Some of you may remember me from the days when I used to run My Writers Circle.

I am mostly retired these days, but to avoid any confusion I wanted to let you know that I recently sold my writing blog at www.entrepreneurwriter.net. The new owner is a guy named Daryl. I don't really know what he plans for the blog, but he is young and full of enthusiasm, so I am hoping he will give it an exciting new lease of life!

I am not really doing much writing these days, but I do have a UK personal finance blog at www.poundsandsense.com if anyone would like to continue to follow me there.

Good luck, and happy writing!

Nick  :)
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All the Write Questions / Re: Punctuating dialogue
« Last post by tudogz on Yesterday at 07:30:35 PM »
Thanks, Jan.

This explains some things that seemed logical but I was still unsure of.

Thanks for the link, also.

 :D ;) :)
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I got excited to see a Flash Fiction Contest not too far down the Word Play & Challenges Thread. Then got really sad when I saw it was a contest that died over two years ago—midstream during the contest. Two entries were received, but the host was extending it for more entries. Any more come in since March of 2017? What about the two entries you got? Let’s have a look at ‘em. Get this party started again.

(I know I haven’t been around in a while, but wha-happened here while I was gone?)
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Writing Games & Challenges / Re: Association Plus
« Last post by MiggsEye on Yesterday at 01:58:29 PM »
Smores
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All the Write Questions / Re: Punctuating dialogue
« Last post by JTetstone on Yesterday at 12:44:28 PM »
Hi fellow scribes.

I'm having difficulty with punctuating dialogue.
Can someone help me with these examples:

Example 1    "We need to work out the arrangements." he said, "Maybe you can help."

Example 2    "We need to work out the arrangements," he said, "maybe you can help."

Example 3    "We need to work out the arrangements," he said. "Maybe you can help."

Ex 1 is the way I've been punctuating most of my dialogue. It was pointed out to me however, that I shouldn't have the full stop after ’arrangements’ as the sentence doesn't end until after ’he said’.

I've also been told to only have a comma after the attribution. But what if I want to start a new sentence, as in Ex 3?
If I only have a comma, do I use a capital letter as in Ex 3 or can I place a period after the attribution? (also as in Ex 3)

I hope this helps.  jt

8 Essential Rules for Punctuating Dialogue - article


Dialogue is a critical component to a great book: it drives action; it reveals character; and it relays facts and information. Writing realistic, compelling dialogue takes skill and practice—and so does punctuating it correctly. Dialogue has its own set of rules that can be tricky to keep straight. Here are eight essential rules for punctuating dialogue correctly, so that your text communicates clearly and appears polished and professional.

1. Use a comma to introduce text

When writing dialogue, place a comma before your opening quote. There is, however, an exception to this rule: no comma is needed when you introduce text using a conjunction, such as that or whether.

She said, "It's all in the details."

He told me that "there are 1,008 different reasons to write."

2. Use a comma when a dialogue tag follows a quote

While your character may have just spoken a complete sentence, you may not need to end it with a period. When dialogue is followed by a tag (for example, he said, asked, replied), then use a comma before the closing quote when you would normally use a period. If no tag follows the text, end the dialogue with punctuation to end the spoken sentence. This rule applies only to periods. You should not omit other punctuation that adds meaning or clarity to the sentence, such as an exclamation point or question mark.

"Let go of your fears," he replied.

"Write from your heart," she stated. "It's the best way to reach the reader."

But

"When is the best time to write?" she asked.

"Now!" he answered.

3. Periods and commas fall within closing quotations

When closing a quotation, a period or comma always falls within the quotation, not outside of it.

"All of these rules are starting to make sense."

"It's a matter of practice," he said.

She explained, "You just need to understand each rule."

4. Question marks, exclamation points, and dashes fall inside or outside closing quotations

In dialogue, question marks, exclamation points, and em dashes typically fall within closing quotation marks. However, it depends on the usage and meaning. These punctuation marks may fall outside of the closing quotation mark in some cases.

"Four!" he shouted, as he whacked the ball off the tee.

Congratulations to "the man who has it all"!

"Are you joining us today?" she asked.

Which book contains the phrase, "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times"?

She said, "I can do this"— and that's when she began her career in writing.

5. Use single quotes when using quotes within dialogue

Use a pair of single quotes nested within doubles to indicate quoted text within dialogue. Note that there is no added space in between the closing single and double quotation mark.

"When doling out dessert, my grandmother always said, 'You may have a cookie for each hand.'"

He said, "I've heard that this one is 'the phone for the next generation,' but I'm not sold on it yet."

6. Use capitalization to indicate the end of the sentence

When writing dialogue, only capitalize the first letter of a word to indicate the end of the sentence. There may be times when you end the quote with punctuation that would normally require the next word to be capitalized, such as an exclamation point or question mark. But unless the sentence is truly over, use a lowercase letter to follow this punctuation.

"He's here! He's here!" she screamed.

"Would you like to answer the door?" she asked.

"What do you mean," he said to Jenna, "by asking me to dinner?"

7. Use paragraph breaks to indicate a change in speaker

In dialogue, a new paragraph is used each time there's a change in speaker. This helps with clarity and can eliminate the need to add tags after each line of dialogue. Here's an example from A Tale of Two Cities:

"You know the Old Bailey well, no doubt?" said one of the oldest of clerks to Jerry the messenger.

"Ye-es, sir," returned Jerry, in something of a dogged manner. "I do know the Bailey."

"Just so. And you know Mr. Lorry?"

"I know Mr. Lorry, sir, much better than I know the Bailey. Much better," said Jerry, not unlike a reluctant witness at the establishment in question, "than I, as a honest tradesman, wish to know the Bailey."

8. When in doubt, look it up

The rules for punctuating dialogue are established for the sake of clarity. Follow the rules, and you can communicate your message clearly to your reader. You can find more details and examples to special cases in The Chicago Manual of Style. Also, rely on a good copy editor to help you catch any errors in dialogue punctuation you may have missed.

https://www.authorlearningcenter.com/writing/fiction/w/character-development/6491/8-essential-rules-for-punctuating-dialogue---article
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Welcome Board - START HERE! / Re: Women's fiction Writer
« Last post by Olesia on Yesterday at 04:50:15 AM »
Hi Ana!

Welcome to My Writers Circle, we’re happy to have you as part of the community!

Please comment and critique others writings, share your own work and get advice on it, that's what this community is all about and we're looking forward to your contribution!

There aren’t a lot of rules here as we want to give everyone creative freedom, we ask that you respect fellow community members and help us maintain a friendly place.

Start by checking out the different threads, you’ll find Sticky topics at the top of each one which shares a bit about the thread and the purpose it serves, try to use the relevant thread for your topics and if you can’t find one shoot us a PM so we can help!

One rule often missed by new members is the 2000 max word count for posts in Review My Work, 1500 max for posts in Review My Script and 100 lines in Review My Poetry. A reasonable limit considering critiques are often quite detailed. You will gain valuable feedback more easily digested in bite-sized chunks.

Please Take Note: With the exception of The Gallery, any work posted in the prose or poetry boards is subject to review by fellow members. You may find some critiques to be worthwhile. Some you may feel do not fit your work. Virtually all are an honest effort to help you improve your writing. Take what you find useful and disregard the rest. This is how we learn our craft.

As a newbie to MWC, you will not be able to edit your posts until you have reached the 50-post milestone. Should be easy, especially if you spend some time on the Games thread. It will also improve your vocabulary and hopefully bring on a few laughs. Have fun.

The moderators are easy to spot due to all the blue stars floating above our heads. If you have a problem, we are happy to help. Just click on the private message (PM) icon of any moderator and send along your question or problem.

Let us know if there is anything we can do to help with your writing journey!
Olesia
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All the Write Questions / Punctuating dialogue
« Last post by tudogz on Yesterday at 12:36:27 AM »
Hi fellow scribes.

I'm having difficulty with punctuating dialogue.
Can someone help me with these examples:

Example 1    "We need to work out the arrangements." he said, "Maybe you can help."

Example 2    "We need to work out the arrangements," he said, "maybe you can help."

Example 3    "We need to work out the arrangements," he said. "Maybe you can help."

Ex 1 is the way I've been punctuating most of my dialogue. It was pointed out to me however, that I shouldn't have the full stop after ’arrangements’ as the sentence doesn't end until after ’he said’.

I've also been told to only have a comma after the attribution. But what if I want to start a new sentence, as in Ex 3?
If I only have a comma, do I use a capital letter as in Ex 3 or can I place a period after the attribution? (also as in Ex 3)
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