My Writers Circle

Writing => All the Write Questions => Topic started by: glued on December 20, 2006, 03:32:03 AM

Title: how to Edit your novel
Post by: glued on December 20, 2006, 03:32:03 AM
I want to start editing the rough draft for my novel.
Problem is i start reading it and only take care of the grammatical mistakes or make some comments on the printed ms. For some reason I don't actually get to rewrite it. [I know procrastination is one reason.]

I know my novel needs major surgery but I just am not able to do it. What is the best approach to edit the draft and get it polished.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: nassj on December 20, 2006, 03:38:19 AM
hello Glued, how is the baby. I don't know this one, my sugestion would be to leave it alone in a drawer for another wee while.
Have you got it printed out? If you have you could curl up on the sofa at night with a red pen, read through it and cross bits off, add new bits, whatever. Might be comfy. Sorry I couldn't help more.  :)
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Symphony on December 20, 2006, 04:35:29 AM
Hi there,

Don't worry! You're not alone! Here comes the difficult part and it's SOOOOOO difficult to get down to doing it. In effect, writing your novel is the easy bit. The hard work starts here - the tough bit, the demoralising bit but also the exciting bit.

Take it page by page or chapter by chapter. So you're only editing grammatical errors and typos? What's wrong with that? That's a great place to start because you can't edit any writing properly if it's got mistakes in it. Do that first and pat yourself on the back. Then I'd put it in a drawer for three weeks or so. Set yourself a timeline - put a date in your diary. Try and forget about it. Start on your next novel.

When you next take it out, you can start the real editing. Why would you need to rewrite it? If you're happy with it, you might not need to rewrite anything at all and that's fantastic. Don't get it into your head that you MUST rewrite. You might want to rewrite a chapter - or certain paragraphs or bits and pieces but we're not talking complete rewrites here. You might be the very one who doesn't need to rewrite ANYTHING!!

Read it again - and again and again. Read it aloud, too. See how it sounds. You might even like to record it and then listen to it back - can be very revealing. When you're happy with it, get someone else to read it, but don't rush off paying money for professional editors. Try your friends first - make sure they like the characters, that they don't get bored in places, that the chapters are clear. Do up a little questionnaire for them, if you like - particularly about bits you're worried about (but don't tell them beforehand).

It's a struggle because you think you've neared the end and the hard slog is still ahead. I hope, for your sake, that you perhaps don't have many changes to make at all. Hey! Keep at it - and by February you'll have written your synopsis and hopefully be thinking about sending out those first three chapters

Hope this helps a little bit - there are also plenty of books around to help you get started.

All the best,
Symphony
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: bob414bob on December 20, 2006, 05:06:48 AM
To Symphony,
                     Thats really helpful. I'm also about to start editing mine. I've just started a new one(in the hope of distracting myself) because I really want to get tuck into it. I will be good though and leave it a few weeks.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: glued on December 20, 2006, 06:45:49 AM
Candy, thanks for the message. Baby is doing fine; I'm the one along with wifey who have to get up at night. Yep the little one is a night person and I normally walk her each night for 45minutes to when shes ready to doze off again. I shall be posting her pics here later. Thanks for the advice.

Symphony thanks so much for that piece of advice. I was getting exasparated, but your encouragement has cheered me up. And no i am unfortunately one of those who shall have to do some rewriting. Perhaps not on the second one. ;)

Bob, you stay away from that MS. I can feel you clawing out and trying to get it into your hands.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: bob414bob on December 20, 2006, 07:18:21 AM
To glued,
             but its sooooooooo hard. This is how sad I am, I went out and bought two new red pens today so when the great day arrives, I'm ready to edit. I know I know, very sad!!!!

I did start my new novel last night though so that should help.
Good luck with yours, let us know how its going.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: nassj on December 20, 2006, 10:38:56 AM
Good luck to both Jo and Glued.

Glued, can't wait to see the pics, the sleepless nights won't last forever. They don't last long enough infact, it's when they get older, making demands, and have an answer for evertyhing that the fun starts. :)
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: glued on December 20, 2006, 11:58:59 PM
Hiya Candy,
You look great with the Chimp costume off or is this just the Candy costume special for Xmas and then the chimp comes back. :D
You are right about the answers for everything and then there are the questions which have no answers.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: nassj on December 21, 2006, 02:58:43 AM
lol  :)
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: N.Mott on December 21, 2006, 03:27:21 PM
I recommend changing the text to 1.5 spacing and printing it off by chapters when editing. It reads differently somehow.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: orchid15 on December 21, 2006, 10:04:59 PM
I personally like to use Stylewriter pro.  It is a program that finds misspelled words,  improper grammar, easily confused words, overused words, weak words and passive verbs.  It isn't the only tool I use, but it is a good beginning.  the great thing is that after using it on four or five stories, I didn't write many passive sentences anymore.  The program improved my grammar better than any teacher ever did.

I also do word searches for 'that, just, only, very, would, could, seem, had, of, and but."  and I try to rephrase the sentences to do without those words whenever possible.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: bob414bob on December 23, 2006, 04:46:03 PM
To  orchid15,
                    Hi do you have a web address for style writer pro? I've been looking for it on the web, but I can't find it. Thanks
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: eric on December 23, 2006, 05:26:12 PM
The best editing job I've seen in MWC is what "Mysterious Presence" did for Katrina in her thread about her ms. "Beyond" in the Review your Work section.  I really recommend it to anyone about to start editing on their own, software or no software.  It shows you how to eliminate unneeded words, period.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: orchid15 on December 23, 2006, 08:49:37 PM
Bob,

here is one place to get it
http://www.writersupercenter.com/stylewriter/

I don't get any kickback r anything, I was just pleasantly surprised when I used it at how much I learned.  Before I used to have trouble with passive ssentences, and now I write very few of them.

I'm sure there are people who do a lot better job than the program, but I highly recommend the program for beginners who don't know where to start.

Eric, I agree with you that we can learn a lot from what Mysterious Presence did for Katrina's excerpt from beyond, but that is pretty sophisticated editing that takes ime and effort to learn.  Anyone who can edit at that level doesn't need any editing program.  My reccommendation (and the plea for help from the poster of this thread) is for someone who is a beginner and wants help learning how to edit, and the program does that better than any other directions I've found.  I have been writing for five years, and I edited the old fashioned way for three years before findiong the program.  Whichever way we edit, it improves our ability to write, because as we see errors, we try to avoid those errors in the future.

I never found Word's grammar correcting program to be much help. or the other programsI tried.  What I like about stylewriter pro is that I learned so much from it.  I can ssee a time in the near future when I don't need it because I'll be following the rules naturally in my first draft.

the program had a 30 day free trial when I tried it.  If you want to do that, I recommend you have a lot ready to edit so you can get the most out of the program before it expires.

orchid
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Gyppo on December 24, 2006, 07:13:31 PM
The ones who suggest tucking your MS away for a few weeks before editing are spot on.  Although it was a far shorter item I once wtote an article of about two thousand words and felt inspired to tackle it almost as soon as I finshed.

I rewrote the thing six times in quick succession, chopping whole paragraphs, compressing some to a single sentence which I felt conveyed the mesage even better.  All this on top of spelling etc.

Finally I was happy with the sixth version.  I compared it with the original and despite all the changes I'd managed to write myself almost into a full circle, there being very little difference between first and final drafts.

If you tackle the job too soon your brain will still be thinking along the same lines.  You will *still* be seeing it as an author, not as a reader.

It really helps if you can do a different sort of writing for a while in between.  Write a few factual items before attacking your novel.  This wil 'reset' your brain, like restarting a computer which has got itslef into a 'loop'.

Best wishes with your novel.  I've only had one published, but I still recall the feeling when the letter accepting it arrived.  Well worth all the slog of editing, no matter how pedestrian it seemed after the excitement of creating the thing initially.

Gyppo 
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: S-wo on December 27, 2006, 05:17:40 PM
I haven't finished with mine, but I can say whenever I'm writing in my book and think I might want to change it later I write it down where I keep all my notes so when I come back to start editing, I'll know what I want to change with the story.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Symphony on December 28, 2006, 05:31:34 PM
I went out and bought two new red pens today so when the great day arrives, I'm ready to edit.


Argh!!! A true victim of 'negative' teaching - the bane of today's society. Now dump those damned red pens which stink of nothing but 'wrong' and 'do it again' - and go buy yourself a bunch of blue and green pens and some highlighters, which say 'think about this' or 'I'm sure I could reword this bit' ...


And while I'm on that note ...

I'm sure all these computer programmes are fab but isn't it just such a great, great shame that we have so many wonderful writers with the most fantastical imaginations whose books and stories are being rewritten by computer programmes??? Argh, I say. Argh! If you don't like the weak verbs or repetition of the same words, etc. etc., then take it out because YOU don't like it, not because 'Compoo'ah says No' (think Little Britain!!!). Isn't that what that sketch is all about? We laugh - and yet here's half a thread on a writer's forum doing exactly that! I find that very demoralising.
What hope for the English language.

Symphony
x

Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: eric on December 28, 2006, 05:45:29 PM
I think Symphony is right on the mark.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: glued on December 29, 2006, 12:07:44 AM

I'm sure all these computer programmes are fab but isn't it just such a great, great shame that we have so many wonderful writers with the most fantastical imaginations whose books and stories are being rewritten by computer programmes??? Argh, I say. Argh! If you don't like the weak verbs or repetition of the same words, etc. etc., then take it out because YOU don't like it, not because 'Compoo'ah says No' (think Little Britain!!!).


Why do I get all the inspirational advice after I'm done with half the edit. Yep I took out a lot of repititions because MSWord told me to.
Totally agree with you Symphony.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: glued on December 29, 2006, 12:15:37 AM
Sorry I posted this earlier in Bob's thread but decided it looked better here.:

I am doing my edit on my first novel draft which is a literary piece. The word count is at 66,000. I thought I would increase it to around 70 to80K.
Now I feel I should make it tighter and it'll lread better at 50,000. Also make it easier for publishers to try their luck with me. What say you. Is that word count acceptable.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: orchid15 on December 29, 2006, 03:35:40 PM
I'm sure all these computer programmes are fab but isn't it just such a great, great shame that we have so many wonderful writers with the most fantastical imaginations whose books and stories are being rewritten by computer programmes??? Argh, I say. Argh! If you don't like the weak verbs or repetition of the same words, etc. etc., then take it out because YOU don't like it, not because 'Compoo'ah says No' (think Little Britain!!!).  

Such an emotional response for such a little thing.  Although I love the program, I would never change a word just because the program highlights it.
but the program highlights the same words I hear publishers don't like, and many of the same ones I've heard professional authors say to avoid.  So I give it a second look and see if I can say that phrase better? can I tighten it up and give it some sparkle?

Maybe most of the people here are professional and understand weak verbs, but I never did until the program pointed them out to me and as I tried different ways to reword it, I suddenly 'heard' the difference.  It was the same with passive verbs.  It was only after the program pointed them out to me and I tried other ways of rephrasing that I discovered why editors care.

Like it or not, most of the time the program is right.  It doesn't suggest replacement words, it's up to me to rephrase it.  And I remember what an author once said-- use stronger verbs and more descriptive nouns.  Also, the program is a great teaching tool.  I find my first drafts are improving because I have such a better understanding of why those words aren't wanted.

Of course, I ignore a lot of things it tries to correct because I am using specific words for effect. This program is better suited for non-fiction editing, and dialoge and phrasing for effect will get highlighted sometimes.  We have to remember the program is just a tool to improve our craft.  I suggested the program as a way for beginners to learn to edit, not as the answer to every writer's problems.  I can see that after about six months to a year, I won't need the program anymore because I will have learned not to make those errors.

It is simply an easy way of having grammar errors pointed out.  I know some people pay others to do that, I prefer to use the program and persopnally decide on each change. at my convenience, instead of sending it out and getting the corrected manuscript back.

I do believe we need to know we are improving our manuscript, instead of just changing because the program (or a professional editor) says to.  that is why I read it aloud before and after each change, and only keep a change if it sounds better.

Not meant to inflame or get anyone's goat.  I just thought other beginners might like the same kind of help I got.  I kinda thought we were here to encourage what helps most people instead of bashing the tools others find handy and condemning those who use them.

orchid
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: glued on December 30, 2006, 12:12:11 AM
I think both Orchid and Symphony are correct.

In my zeal to follow the Programme instructions, I sometimes pull the trigger too fast and that is what both of you are warning against. I have nothing against computer programs and use them a lot at my job to simplify difficult processes. I guess the same applies to writing.
There has to be judicious use of the tool.
Last night I was reading a book by a first time novelist and she had crafted a beautiful sentence. The moment I  read it I knew my software would have screamed " Fragment; revision advised." That is what Symphony seems to be warning against.

Beautiful writing does break the rules of grammer at times. Yet while we write our lengthy manuscripts, in our haste we overlook so much that can actually be corrected and that's where softwares help us think. Newbies like myself are treading new ground here and both perspectives are equally helpful.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Symphony on December 30, 2006, 07:01:42 AM
Hi there,

Sorry - my response was obviously more emotional than I felt!!! (or feel??)

I feel that these computer programmes are probably best suited to more seasoned writers, not beginners - those who know that spell checks usually muck up everything and can cause hugely embarassing errors and that grammar checks don't work 99% of the time. Obviously, these programmes have been working very well for you. They're designed to be used in a certain way and suit certain people and it's brilliant if you can make them work to your advantage. I fear, however, that 99% of people are NOT like you - and that they will rely on these programmes to do their editing, spelling and everything else because that's how they're marketed.  That's what worries me most. 

S
x
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: orchid15 on December 30, 2006, 12:58:12 PM
Hi Symphony,

Yeah, your reaction kinda blew me away, especially since you have always seemed so encouraging and friendly.

I have to ask,  Have you ever used stylewriter pro?  It is nothing like MSWord, which i also use, but am not crazy about it.  When it comes to possibly misspelled words, stylewriter gives you the similar words with the meanings,  which is nice for lay and lie, or forth and fourth.  So you aren't picking blindly, you are choosing by meaning.  The program goes a bit overboard marking sexist writing, and highlights girl, woman, lady and man, which might be important in a corporate setting, but perfectly okay in  a novel.  It does suggest not uisng 'pretty', 'nice' and 'lots of', and encourages you to minimize the use of compound verbs.  the only place I have any problems is if I have a person speaking in dialect (Where it tries to have me correct the spelling), or have a child speaking- (then the program marks it as overwriting, which is how kids speak.)

the ignore buttons are easy to use

I've never tried any other grammar programs, mostly because when I was looking for one, Stylewriter was touted to be different from any other and the closest thing to a real person gramatically correcting a piece.  The fact that it gave a 30 day free trial didn't hurt.

You might check it out before asuming it is only for advanced writers, since it has a free trial.

I've tried a lot of other writing programs and felt they weren't worh the bother.  New Novelist and dramatica were a lot of trouble, and probably should be limited to people with more experience.  Just learning the vocabulary for those was a trial.  Actually, I ended up trashing the whole lot except for stylewriter.

Orchid
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Symphony on December 30, 2006, 01:31:54 PM
Quote
Yeah, your reaction kinda blew me away, especially since you have always seemed so encouraging and friendly.

 >:(   Sorry about that. I didn't mean to sound discouraging - just letting off a bit of steam. Apols again.

And once again - it's all about what works, isn't it? And if it works for you I honestly think that's fantastic. And I'm not 'assuming' that it's for advanced writers. On the contrary, these programmes are written for novices - and that's what worries me. If you (that's a general 'you') don't already know what weak verbs are - or weak expressions - then how do you know you're getting the correct informtion from a computer programme? Yes, I know - it's all a matter of using your brain and interpreting the information correctly - and obviously you can do that - but a lot of writers (particularly novices) can't.  That's all I'm trying to say - honestly.

I'm afraid you'll never convince me to try it because I trust my own instincts when it comes to editing. However, I WILL keep the programme in mind and on your recommendation will certainly suggest this particular one to anyone who asks since, from your description, it seems to be reliable and a great asset as a learning tool when used correctly.

Thanks for your help - and the time you've taken to explain your usage of it and your ideas. The debate has definitely convinced me that there IS a programme worth recommending!  ;D

And now I'm off to contemplate the relationship between colours, humour and Rudolph's nose (and you think I'm joking?) - first reasonable bit of inspiration for a story that I've had in a year!

(http://www.coolsmileys.net/affection/flowers1.gif)    for you, Orchid

Symphony

Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: DIZI on December 30, 2006, 03:45:42 PM
I think skywriter looks really good, just the thing for beginers like me.
Ufortunately it's out of my price range. Even for the free trial, you had to buy something else first.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: nassj on December 30, 2006, 07:53:08 PM
I am no good with technology ( I have prob spelled it wrong )

I like my note book.  ;D
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Arnie Birk on January 11, 2007, 04:58:31 PM
As always, there's a book about it. Well, in fact, I've got two. One is called "The Complete Guide to Editing Your Fiction". It's by Micheal Seidman (whose surname actually means wizard i Old Norse) and published by Writer's Digest Books. The other one, which is the better of the two in my opinion, is called "Self-Editing For Fiction Writers". It's by Renni Browne and Dave King, and it's published by Quill. Both books are American, but it's almost like English anyway, so give them a try. :D (They are, of course, availble from www.amazon.co.uk.)

Arnie Birk
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: bob414bob on January 11, 2007, 06:27:40 PM
I have to agree with Symphony to a point. I'm dyslexic and so I have a real problem with grammar and punctuation. Unfortunately, I don't trust my instincts( cos they're normally wrong) but I am aware that spell/ grammar checkers can and do make mistakes. Since I started writing my novel, my spelling has improved, but I run everything through the Google spellcheck (yes, even this post).
It doesn't seem to help if I read something aloud as both versions will seem right to me.
That's why I always ask for my work to be checked for grammar. I think I am slowly improving, but its slow progress.
Just to make you laugh, I get the biggest buzz when my spellcheck says, no spelling mistakes were found. Sad eh!
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on January 11, 2007, 08:53:25 PM
 I get the biggest buzz when my spellcheck says, no spelling mistakes were found. Sad eh!

Jo, I'm not dyslexic, I'm just not that good of a speller.  I also run things through spell check and when I get the all clear without even one correction I feel a little tingle too.  ;)

Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: fordy on January 11, 2007, 09:43:16 PM
A short personal story ...

When I was a young lad at school, I flunked English; basically because my spelling was poor (this was a long time ago).  I ended up being fearful of writing anything down because of the hilarity that my spelling caused.  When I went to work, if I needed letters or reports written, I would always dictate them to the secretary (I did say this was a long time ago, right?).  Then, someone came up with computers, word processing and SPELL CHECKING.  If I knew who that was I would send them flowers every Christmas.

The writer in me got liberated by that tool: yes, I know their/there are shortcomings but it isn't too/to/two difficult to learn those instances where the spell checker will put you wrong if you aren't careful.   I love the red squiggly lines - they draw my attention to POTENTIAL problems and allow me to correct, go check it out, or ignore the suggestion.

Point is, I would love to be as naturally precise as Symphony clearly is, but I am not.  And for me, the choice is to let a tool like a spell checker help me, or crawl back into the woodwork and never write again.  I do agree though, that using any of these tools indiscriminately is dangerous and as users we need to learn how to use them at the conceptual level as well as the practical. 

David (posted from the Firefox browser, which has a built it spell checker)  ;D
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Patx on January 12, 2007, 06:32:59 AM
Hi Glued

"I am doing my edit on my first novel draft which is a literary piece. The word count is at 66,000. I thought I would increase it to around 70 to80K.
Now I feel I should make it tighter and it'll lread better at 50,000. Also make it easier for publishers to try their luck with me. What say you. Is that word count acceptable."

If this is a literary novel then I wouldn't even be worrying about word count at this stage - if it's good enough the amount of words will not make a difference.

Polish up your first three chapters - ignore the rest of the book and get those three chapters sent out to an agent with a synopsis - this is the important stuff - don't waste time on chapters an agent may never even ask to read.

If it's good enough, and they want it, they will give you the time and help to sort out the rest.
If it's good enough they will give you time  and help
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: N.Mott on January 12, 2007, 06:52:29 AM
Quote
Now I feel I should make it tighter and it'll lread better at 50,000. Also make it easier for publishers to try their luck with me. What say you. Is that word count acceptable.

I've just been on another forum where an author's first novel was 50,000 words. The publisher thought it was good but too short for a first novel (which can make or break an author's reputation) and so wanted another 20,000 words before publishing it.
The author did a rewrite but the pace etc of the novel fell apart and his Agent recommended that he shelve it for the time being, finish off Novel2 which would be published as his first novel, then resubmit the shorter novel once he was better known.

So the moral of that story is, don't shove words in if it ruins the story, you can always come back to it later in your career.

 
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Patx on January 12, 2007, 07:43:02 AM
Spot on Naomi

No agent or publisher considers taking on a book because it's got the right amount of words

You've got to get them to like it enough to want to finish it before they even think of saying 'it's too short' or 'it's too long'
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Arnie Birk on January 12, 2007, 11:13:08 AM
As for spelling checkers, check out this posting by a visiting Dave: http://www.mywriterscircle.com/index.php?topic=5915.msg49527#msg49527

Arnie
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: glued on January 13, 2007, 12:57:46 AM
Interesting points Pat X and Naomi,

As a matter of fact since the first post on this thread I have begun to realise that word count is a silly way of setting up your novel. I have been silly enough to work according to the formula that everyone speaks about.
What I feel now is that what matters is the quality of those 50 or 60 or 70K words. Quantity by itself is no yardstick, though a novel has to obviously be a novel. And that means a minimum word count as a guide line.

Pat I am trying to make this tighter. I feel that I had written scenes that add nothing to the novel or that could be shortened. Let me say this: It is tough and I have begun hating what I wrote. >:(
And now i have to deal with that.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: fordy on January 13, 2007, 01:29:23 AM
Let me say this: It is tough and I have begun hating what I wrote. >:(
And now i have to deal with that.

Oh yes, can I relate to this.  It happened to me just last weekend.  I had been working on this story for three months, first draft complete, started first edit and was now on chapter three.  Then, one morning, it was sitting there on the desk and I started to read chapter one again.  A couple of paragraphs later I was thinking, "this is crap.  No one is ever going to want to read this.  What made you think you could write".  Ruined my weekend.  >:(
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: glued on January 13, 2007, 06:42:08 AM
Fordy,
Well both of us have lots of company, thats for sure.
I feel like putting my MS into a cold storage and starting a new novel. But I just cannot do that either. My mind is not willing to accept new ideas.
I wanted to edit my MS today but escaped from the desk all day. It's just getting on my nerves and I keep thinking over this again and again.

OK no more whining. I had to say this.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: fordy on January 13, 2007, 02:00:41 PM
Fordy,
Well both of us have lots of company, thats for sure.
I feel like putting my MS into a cold storage and starting a new novel. But I just cannot do that either. My mind is not willing to accept new ideas.
I wanted to edit my MS today but escaped from the desk all day. It's just getting on my nerves and I keep thinking over this again and again.

OK no more whining. I had to say this.

Well, this is what I came up with at the time ...

I spent a while wrestling with the thought: is crap ... isn't crap ... is crap ... isn't crap (you get the idea?) and realised that this wasn't an argument that I could win right now. Only other people can tell me if they find my writing crap and even then it is only their opinion (though ten out of ten could be convincing!).

Point is, crap or not, I haven't yet finished writing the best book I can. It's still mainly rough draft and until I have finished editing it and making it the best I can make it, it doesn't get subjected to the crap test.

So, unwelcome thought that you are, your day has not yet come - you are going to have to wait until I am 'finished' (whatever that means). Now, back to that editing.
Title: Re: how to Edit your novel
Post by: Arnie Birk on January 13, 2007, 02:09:39 PM
Ernest Hemingway has been quoted as saying, "All first drafts are crap!"

Arnie