My Writers Circle

Writing => All the Write Questions => Topic started by: Mister URL on February 09, 2018, 07:53:55 PM

Title: Question
Post by: Mister URL on February 09, 2018, 07:53:55 PM
I find the phrase 'in and of itself' irritating. Can someone tell me how this got to be a near-universal phrase and what exactly it means? It sound like the thing - whatever it happens to be - is true both 'of itself' and 'in itself' and neither makes any more sense than the full rendering.
Title: Re: Question
Post by: LRSuda on April 06, 2018, 06:02:30 PM
I wouldn't worry about it. The phrase is cliche and seldom used anymore. Besides, we all have phrases we hate.
Title: Re: Question
Post by: heartsongjt on November 14, 2018, 10:30:35 PM
I find the phrase 'in and of itself' irritating. Can someone tell me how this got to be a near-universal phrase and what exactly it means? It sound like the thing - whatever it happens to be - is true both 'of itself' and 'in itself' and neither makes any more sense than the full rendering.

“In and of itself” is one of those phrases like “each and every” and “part and parcel” that say the same thing twice. Usually it is enough to say “in itself.”

jt