My Writers Circle

Writing => The Writers Circle => Topic started by: 13angelface94 on July 10, 2015, 05:23:37 PM

Title: Publishers
Post by: 13angelface94 on July 10, 2015, 05:23:37 PM
Hi all! I am a hopeful author and have looked for publishers. Unfortunately all that I have found are vanity publishers. Google has not helped my search. Does anyone have any publishers that they have enjoyed working with?
 
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: thatollie on July 11, 2015, 05:59:37 PM
Well, you might want to be more specific. You haven't mentioned what kind of piece you're trying to sell to a publisher.

Also, you may want to try the Writers and Artists Yearbook.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/1408192454
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: CodyWright77 on July 11, 2015, 09:11:24 PM
I'm guessing you want to try your luck with a large publishing house?  If so, I've read a few blogs on the necessity of finding a good agent, and what all that entails.  If I can find the link to it, I'll post it up here.  But yeah, publishing the traditional way is frightening territory for me.  I barely can run a public blog!  ;D
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: Lin on July 12, 2015, 04:01:58 AM
The way I did this was to join a society of my genre and get in with the in crowd.  The other alternative is to buy a copy of the Writers' and Artists' Yearbook and the third option is to Google your genre i.e. Romance publishers, Crime publishers.  It all depends on your genre and what each publisher is looking for. There are plenty of publishers out there and again it depends if you are looking for an Indie publisher or something a bit more ambitious.   eg Harper Collins etc.  Most of the big publishing houses are only approached via an agent.

Beware when signing contracts.  Get someone with experience to peruse it for you.  Don't jump in with both feet.  Do make sure that you read and provide them with EXACTLY what they are asking for.  Don't expect answers immediately.  I need to know your genre before I can comment fully. You can offer your book to a few publishers at a time to save waiting around.  It could take up to six months or more before you hear from them.  In the meantime get on with your next novel.

The other thing I learned from experience was not to listen too hard to what other people tell you.  Each experience is different and there are no hard and fast rules.  The publisher's guidelines will differ and therefore you must give each one what they want.  Don't add any flowery language to your submission, just plain and simple. Then move on.  

Lastly, decide what it is you want from your book.  Do you want Kindle sales and a hard copy? Or digital only.  What do you propose to do with this book?  Are you prepared to help sell it yourself?  These are all questions you have to consider before you take on any contract.  So do get advice and when you have it in your head what you wish to achieve, then find the publisher who will give you those options. Peruse their web site and see if they can offer what YOU want.  You have a choice, don't get bowled over with excitement on the first offer, if this is NOT for you then you can turn it down.  Don't accept an offer just for the sake of being published for the first time. If one publisher likes it, then it's possible another will too.  

I have an offer with an agent at the moment.  I was at an RNA party when I met her and she offered for me to submit my first three chapters and a synopsis.  This is the way to go as far as I am concerned.  Talk to the right people face to face.  In that respect you will be remembered.  The Romantic Novelists' Association has all kinds of events and if you are just starting out, their New Writers Scheme is a most valuable tool.  They will assess your manuscript and provide a report so you have the confidence to move on. They will also point you in the right direction toward publishing.

I hope this helps

Lin  :D

Good luck.



Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: Matt Walker on July 12, 2015, 01:36:59 PM
I agree with going the agent route. Most publishers don't accept unsolicited submissions. An agent will help edit and sell your book for a standard commission (usually 15%).
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: 13angelface94 on July 12, 2015, 08:29:36 PM
Thank all for you encouragement and perspective! I currently have finished writing a fantasy fiction.  And having your advice has given me a second wind to pursue my desire to publish. Thank you all!!! :)
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: CodyWright77 on July 14, 2015, 11:12:14 AM
Don't forget: you also have the option of self publishing via Amazon.  I've read (if they are true) several encouraging stories of people making it by self-publishing.  If you haven't looked into it, I suggest you do.  It's another option to consider. 
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: Matt Walker on July 14, 2015, 03:45:15 PM
Don't forget: you also have the option of self publishing via Amazon.  I've read (if they are true) several encouraging stories of people making it by self-publishing.  If you haven't looked into it, I suggest you do.  It's another option to consider. 

It is something to consider, however I'd only recommended self-publishing if you've exhausted the traditional route (or unless you're publishing a non-fiction book with limited appeal). For every self-publishing success story there are literally hundreds of thousands that sold next to nothing.
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: thatollie on July 15, 2015, 02:37:02 AM
It is something to consider, however I'd only recommended self-publishing if you've exhausted the traditional route (or unless you're publishing a non-fiction book with limited appeal). For every self-publishing success story there are literally hundreds of thousands that sold next to nothing.

Also, if you do manage to go the traditional route, that isn't a guarantee of sales either.
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: Matt Walker on July 15, 2015, 03:27:21 AM
Also, if you do manage to go the traditional route, that isn't a guarantee of sales either.

Of course not. But the average traditionally-published novel far outsells the average self-published one. And you don't have to worry about paying for cover design or line editing. You may even get an advance with a traditional publisher.
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: Lin on July 15, 2015, 08:12:15 AM
Be sure you understand the difference between self publishing and vanity publishing.  They are different. 

Quote; Unfortunately all that I have found are vanity publishers.

Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: thatollie on July 16, 2015, 05:58:37 PM
Of course not. But the average traditionally-published novel far outsells the average self-published one. And you don't have to worry about paying for cover design or line editing. You may even get an advance with a traditional publisher.

I love how you put "may even get an advance", phrases like that shatter so many people's dreams of massive advances.
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: Gyppo on July 16, 2015, 07:25:42 PM
Maybe some of those dreams need to be shattered.  After all, if a man was paying you to dig a ditch he wouldn't pay you a huge lump up front in the fond hope that other people would come along later and pay him for the privilege of admiring the ditch you dug for him.

If indeed you even finished digging it, and didn't lose interest halfway through, or got in a snit and walked off because he wanted you to make minor changes to the route, direction, or depth.

I think some people don't understand it's 'an advance against royalties', not a prepaid bonus.  If the book doesn't sell well enough to produce the royalties the publisher is out of pocket.

Gyppo
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: Matt Walker on July 17, 2015, 02:30:21 AM

I think some people don't understand it's 'an advance against royalties', not a prepaid bonus.  If the book doesn't sell well enough to produce the royalties the publisher is out of pocket.

Gyppo

At least you don't need to give any of the advance back if your book doesn't sell well! That's a false rumour I often hear.

Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: MiggsEye on July 18, 2015, 11:06:11 AM
At least you don't need to give any of the advance back if your book doesn't sell well! That's a false rumour I often hear.



I think one would have to give the advance back if they didn't deliver the completed manuscript. But if it doesn't sell well, that's the publishers loss. And, of course, the authors to reputation and future book deals.
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: 13angelface94 on August 04, 2015, 04:57:15 PM
Is there any publishers anyone would recommend? I am currently in contact with Xlibris publishing. Has anyone worked with them? If so, are they a good publisher to work with?
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: Matt Walker on August 05, 2015, 08:09:43 AM
They are a vanity press (but at least they're up front about it, unlike Pegasus), and there's nothing wrong with that per se. As long as you have a few thousand pounds of disposable income to throw at this (don't expect to make anything back unless you are a marketing expert or have 100,000 followers on Twitter).
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: Lin on August 05, 2015, 02:41:44 PM
Be very careful with vanity publishing and do not  and I repeat DO NOT PAY ANY MONEY UP FRONT and sign a contract only to get your name in lights!

What you should be looking for is a sound publisher and if your work is good enough they will take you up on the offer.  Some writers think their work is wonderful and cannot understand it when they receive a rejection.  They just don't see their book as a publisher might see it.

There are some key ingredients to having a book published.  You either have those ingredients or you haven't read up on the subject enough.  I spent ages reading the key factors of a good romance novel.  I probably still don't have what it takes for the future, who knows?  The main thing to remember is that this whole business of being a novelist is a challenge and a way of life not a money earner unless you drop in lucky.  With time you can learn how to make it happen.  It took me ten years and I suspect there are others on this forum who took longer to get published.

The main thing to remember is to ask around and go to workshops and writing conferences.  The York Festival of Writing is coming up in September.  It's a wonderful place to get started. There are loads of agents and publishers waiting to read your novel on a one to one basis.  There you will receive feedback.

Don't be in a hurry, take your time.  The Writers and Artists' Yearbook can be overwhelming but many of the publishers and agents in the book are well known.  You are on the right track asking around, but please whatever you do, don't jump in with both feet! 

Good luck :D

Lin





Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: 13angelface94 on August 05, 2015, 11:06:05 PM
Thank you for the wonderful advice!
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: 13angelface94 on August 05, 2015, 11:12:06 PM
I would absolutely love to go to the York Writing Festival, but unfortunately I am a american who happens to not have very much money at the moment. I will have to look for writing conferences where I live. Thank you again for the wonderful advice!
Title: Re: Publishers
Post by: Lin on August 06, 2015, 08:51:02 AM
Try to find a club or local writers' group.  There must surely be some writing workshops locally for you to attend. 

Lin  :D