My Writers Circle

The Coffee Shop => The Coffee Shop => Topic started by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 03:16:29 AM

Title: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 03:16:29 AM
After a few comments today about understanding what someone from another country means, I thought it would be interesting to find out exactly how much we do vary from each other in everyday speech.

For example, we use a lot of pidgin English and rhyming slang over here and I guess its the norm but a lot of you dudes and dudettes have no idea what I am talking about. The Pom's have an inkling but most.......... ::)

Hit the frog and toad = hit the road  :P

If I am buying a soft drink over here, its referred to as maybe soda over in the US of A.

Chocolates are just that, anything candy is a hard boiled lolly which over seas, who knows what you call it.

Anyone else out there ever wondered?  :D

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 03:24:44 AM
Sure. I always wonder about the differences. I can see the reasons for most of them, like frog and toad for road. Poor little things get hit all the time.

What's Pom's?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 03:48:49 AM
Poms are English people - they turn red as a pomegranate in the sun :)

I did not know Oz uses rhyming slang... but come to think of Oz origins, perhaps not so strange after all, eh, China?

cold drinks are non alcoholic drinks in SA
Car = Vehicle, Automobile
Boot = USA Car Trunk
Handbag = USA Purse
Purse = USA Pocket Book - I think? I've never really come to grips with this one. It's a lady's wallet.
Robot = Traffic Light
Cell Phone = Mobile

I put myself into a USA or UK frame of mind when I enter the challenges to rid the work of all SA-isms ;)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 04:03:55 AM
Ah, robot is interesting. We are traffic lights and mobile phones not cells.

The rest, we are similar except cold drinks.

If we say, "She'll be jake mate," this means everything is ok.  ;)

Bucks or quid refers to dollars.

We go to the loo or the can, not the bathroom.

Do you know what it is to ride the porcelain bus?  8)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 04:18:25 AM
Purse, pocketbook, wallet

In the U.S.:

 a wallet is a wallet

In some states, it's a purse. In other states, it's a pocketbook. It's always a bag or handbag.

Bathroom can be called can or a rest room or powder room or lounge or a dozen other names.

Soda in NY and NJ and elsewhere. It's pop in Ohio and some other states. They both derive from sodapop.

Cold drinks and soft drinks are also non-alky.

I used to know what a porcelain bus was.  A toilet, commode?

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 04:38:04 AM
 :D

To ride the porcelain bus meant you were sick and in the loo.

I remember watching shows as a kid and a lot were American. It sounds so magical as a child, to hear things like going to the soda fountain or flowers and candy.  :D

A drug store, what is that one exactly. Over here, we have chemists where we take a prescription from the doctor to get our medication. I always assumed that is what a drug store was.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 20, 2013, 04:39:28 AM
This is a great excuse for me to tell my favourite US-UK difference:

When I was a young girl (19) newly arrived in the UK, I went out to the pub with some friends and a boy asked me out on a date. I left him hanging and later asked my friends what they thought.

"which one is he?" they said.
"He's around the corner, wearing black pants and red suspenders" I said.

The UK people will understand the looks of horror they gave me.

pants (US) means underwear in UK
suspenders (US) means garter belt in the UK

So, what I wanted to say was "he's wearing black trousers and red braces" - not that I'd been asked out by a member of the Rocky Horror cast :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 04:42:10 AM
 :D :D

That's hilarious!!

It would be 50/50 here. Trousers and pants are the same here but teamed with red suspenders, it would be confusing.  ::)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 04:46:50 AM
Amie, that's really funny. I'll have to remember that.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 04:51:26 AM
Oh, and chocolates are included in candy. Candy is anything wholly non-nutritious and meant as a snack, haha.
Lollipops can also be called suckers, and are also candy.
Candies are sweet, thus can mean a girl.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 20, 2013, 05:03:53 AM
A drug store, what is that one exactly. Over here, we have chemists where we take a prescription from the doctor to get our medication. I always assumed that is what a drug store was.

To my generation a chemist is still a chemist, where you take prescriptions from the doctor or buy cough medicine and condoms.  It may say 'pharmacist' over the door but we think this is a scam dreamed up by signwriters to make a few extra bob.  Our local chemist has changed hands several times but still has the original 60s sign.

Drug store always sounds dodgy to me, like a secret stash in a shed somewhere, where people hand over cash payments to a shady looking geezer with dark glasses and a nervous twitch.

But very rarely these days does anyone describe scrounging a cigarette as 'bumming a fag'.  That's one old phrase which has fallen by the wayside.

Gyppo
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 05:07:02 AM
Over here, a pharmacist works at a drug store, which sells anything and everything. You can even get flu shots at a drug store.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 20, 2013, 05:17:20 AM
When I first came to the UK, "called" meant "came for a visit" (similar to obsolete Southern US usage)

It's not used as commonly now, because I think more people have phones now (that was a huge surprise to me as well when I first came over - the number of people who didn't have phones. Nowadays pretty much every one has a phone, but in the mid-80s, people would ask "are you on the phone?". I think everyone in the US had phones when I was a child in the 70s, so I thought it was kind of sweet in a way....)

Anyway, I recall getting a phone call (we had a payphone in the hall outside our flat, not an actual phone in the flat like a proper American would have had ;) ) for one of my flatmates and saying, "Aaron called"
She said, "Which Aaron?"
Me: "I don't know"
Her: "Well, what did he look like?"
Me: "How would I know?"
Her: "I thought you said he called?!"

(and so on)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 05:28:26 AM
"Called" isn't obsolete in the south. People still call on each other (pay visits).
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 20, 2013, 05:39:15 AM
Gypsies still go' calling', working from door to door either selling wares from a basket (quite rare these days) or looking for work such as gardening.

We also have areas now designated as 'no cold calling' zones.  With signs on the lamposts to deter salespeople and hawkers.  These are for the benefit of wimpy folks  - who seem to be on the increase - who can't simply say no to a 'cold caller', but are frightened by strangers coming up their path and knocking the door.

In our house we still say 'so and so rang', or even 'phoned', when they've phoned, so the difference between that and a personal call is clear.

Gyppo
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 05:43:53 AM
If its a phone called, you say Gyppo called and if he visits, he called round.  ;)

Ok so what's a sock hop? That's mega weird I thought.  :D

Quote
'bumming a fag'.

Yup, that's been dropped over here too mate. But sometimes standing around at dream time at the station ( talking bull dust etc ) someone will say that.

If you bot a fag that was borrow a ciggie, I remember that from days of old.  :P
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 05:54:39 AM
a sock hop = a dance for teens. old saying from the 40s and 50s. It could also be a retro dance. Kids used to wear loafers and socks.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 06:00:50 AM
It was in old TV shows I first heard that one.

I found out biscuits are like our scones. They sounded so yummy as a kid cause I have a sweet tooth, then found out they aren't sweet.  :D

Grits and green tomatoes sound weird, not something I would like to try.  :P
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 06:18:56 AM
I've never had fried green tomatoes, but people say they're good.

I love grits.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 06:26:32 AM
I fried my own green tomatoes to try - they are yummy - sans the bits of people  :P

I have no idea what grits is/are.
I think it might be similar to what we call 'krummel pap' which is maize  porridge cooked so dry it's as close to couscous as you can get it, i.e. each grain is separate.

We eat krummel pap with a tomato and onion based sauce at a braaivleis, which is the rest of the world's bbq

Mielie Pap - maize porridge - can be 'slap' (runny), 'styf' (More or less thick and stiff like oats) or 'Krummel'

These are all Afrikaans words that the whole nation has adopted, so although I am very English I will have a braai, and may or may not serve stywe or krummel pap at the do, depending on who's coming :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 06:43:51 AM
Grits are made from corn meal, much like oatmeal is made from oats.  You can eat grits with salt and butter (my fave, and they shouldn't be runny nor too thick/dry)  or you can get them cold and slice them then fry in bacon grease.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 06:45:04 AM
How do you make that onion and tomato based sauce?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 20, 2013, 06:47:37 AM
Here's another one that I just learned recently:
-   "moot" in the US means "irrelevant"
-   "moot" in the UK means "undecided" or "a point of debate"

Or, another one that I learned very early on:
-   "quite" in the US means "very". "He's quite nice" means "He's very nice".
-   "quite" in the UK can mean anything from "not much" to "a fair amount", depending on the inflection you put on the word. So, for example, if you say, "He's quite nice", it means you have some serious reservations about the chap, and he's just about okay, but you don't really like him much and actually he's probably a total pain in the arse. Whereas if you say, "He's quite nice" with no particular inflection, it means that you have no strong feelings about him either way.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 06:49:07 AM
 ..."bits of people"???
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 20, 2013, 06:50:20 AM
Like in "Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe"

Only it was their ribs, not their tomatoes :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 06:53:14 AM
Amie, now that's really interesting about 'quite'. I didn't realize there was such a difference.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 06:55:05 AM
Wait - I'm not understanding that 'ribs...tomatoes' stuff.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 20, 2013, 06:58:09 AM
Yeah - a British colleague went for an interview in the US, and he was gutted when he got a letter saying, "We were quite impressed with you and your work, and will be in touch to arrange a second interview". He thought they meant, "We thought you were a so-so candidate, and might get in touch to give you a second chance if no one better is available". He was highly suspicious when I told him that it meant they were very impressed with him (he didn't want to have to traipse all the way out to California for an interview with people who thought he was so-so), but i ultimately persuaded him and he got the job and a really nice package.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 20, 2013, 06:59:35 AM
Wait - I'm not understanding that 'ribs...tomatoes' stuff.

Have you seen or read "Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe"? I don't want to give away the plot if you haven't.... (but, you could always wiki it I guess)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 07:05:23 AM
Quite means the same as USA here mate
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 07:06:34 AM
Amie...haha. The movie is just called Fried Green Tomatoes here. I never saw the whole movie, but my husband just explained it to me.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 20, 2013, 07:10:20 AM
I just thought of another one: "tabled"

If you "table" something at a meeting in the US, it means you bring it to the table for discussion.

If you "table" something at a meeting in the UK, it means you put an end to the idea entirely, ie you take it off the table for discussion.

So, if you say, "Can we table Charlie's idea?" at a meeting in the US, Charlie, will probably be pleased. But if you say the same thing in the UK, Charlie will probably feel like you think his ideas aren't worth discussing.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 07:12:27 AM
Its a bit of both here on that one too mate.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 07:13:23 AM
See ya means goodbye. That gets a few  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 20, 2013, 07:18:57 AM
-   "moot" in the UK means "undecided" or "a point of debate"

Back in Anglo-Saxon days when a dispute - usually about territory or ownership of cattle - needed to be settled and the whole village or community needed to be involved they would 'blow the moot horn' to summon everyone to the 'moot' or meet.  Decisions made at the moot were legally binding.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 20, 2013, 07:36:53 AM
naw, I think when you table something, you put it aside.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 20, 2013, 08:21:23 AM
The part of the US I'm from doesn't use tabled in that way. Tabled, as I understand it, still means that it is put on the table to discuss at a later time because it isn't important right now. It's not as bad as totally tossing it, but it isn't pleasing.


The name for sweet, bubbly drinks is quite (ha ha) regional. Some places when you ask for a coke, they then ask you what kind. The name doesn't mean Coke, the brand. I was raised with pop and moved and now drink soda occasionally.

I live in the south now and we have Sweet Tea. It is always cold and always very, very sweet. You can also get Unsweetened Tea, but you better ask for that specifically or you will end up with Sweet Tea. Hot tea is available if you ask for it specifically as well.

What do you foreigners call caramels? Are they still a lolly? That just seems so wrong.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 510bhan on November 20, 2013, 08:53:57 AM
What sort of caramels? Soft runny filling type? Chewy toffee/fudge-like? Hard boiled sweet like?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 09:10:28 AM
We have sweets - which is anything in the sweetie/lolly/candy category except chocolate, which is chocolate.
Sweets can be hard or soft boiled, long or short, suckers or not.

We have biscuits, which are cookies in USA.

Tea and coffee are both hot, sweetened or not, with milk or not, depending on personal taste.

Beer is served cold.

And our spirits tot is bigger than the lot o' youses
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 09:11:17 AM
To table an issue, to me, is to open it up for discussion.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 20, 2013, 09:23:45 AM
In the Mid-South region of Southern USA-

As Spell Chick said, Coke or fountain drink is the name for soda. One might say, "let's stop for a coke," and come out of the store with a root beer or ginger ale.

If you're offered tea, assume it is iced tea and you should indicate sweet or unsweet.

 "Would you like tea?"

"Yes, please. Unsweet."

Hot tea is the stuff you steep.

A candy bar is any kind of chocolate bar, like Snickers of Babe Ruths. Chocolates connotes fancy little things in a box. Hard candies are just that, suckers are on the end of a stick.

Around here Crayfish are called Crawdaddy or Crawdads.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 20, 2013, 09:24:12 AM
To table an issue, to me, is to open it up for discussion.

Here it means to put off a decision.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 20, 2013, 09:38:41 AM
I think I might have got the US and UK definitions of "tabled" backwards.  I never go to meetings where they use the word - my husband works for a multinational company (mainly US and UK) and he complains of this particular misunderstanding frequently (why they havent all worked it out by now I don't know - but I guess it's a big company and plenty of people to get confused :) )
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on November 20, 2013, 11:00:26 AM
Please excuse me for getting swept away into my far distant past and slightly off subject.

I have to go back to Gyppo's "Drug Store" because it brought back such memories.

My very first memory of visiting a drug story was with Mother and one of her friends. I don't remember why I was the only child there, just the magic of the place.

Walking in the door of Collier's (the owner's name) Drug Store was, to me at that age, like walking into a small wonderland. There was a long counter with stools (fixed to the floor) on the right hand side and on the left there was shelves filled with cosmetics, creams, perfumes, etc. etc. etc.

Walking farther into the store, they led me to a booth where we took a seat and a lady came and asked us what we wanted. Mother and her friend ordered whatever they wanted then looked at me and asked what I wanted.

I had no idea what to say because I had never experienced such a strange place before. Mother took pity on me and ordered an Ice Cream Soda.

Okay, I knew "soda" could mean a soda water, which in turn could mean a root beer, or any other type of drink in a bottle to drink. (Was too young to worry about adult drinks at the time.) But I had no idea what an ice cream soda would be.

A tall fluted glass was sit in front of me filled with ice cream and something bubbly. Frothy, almost clear bubbles crowned the top of the glass and threatened to spill over they were so tall.

I took a hesitant taste with the long handled spoon and was swept into childish taste rapture.

That was my introduction to a drug store, one that drew me back at every opportunity.

Over time I also found Collier's sold much more than I saw that day. There was books, magazines, comics, a display of several candies and much more if you took the time to really look.

In one back corner a high counter swept around in a semi-circle creating the area where Mr. Collier reigned. From there he processed and sold the meds. ordered by the doctors.

Later, when I was about 11 or 12, Mr. Collier let me put what was to be my first camera on lay-away. A small Kodak camera that I paid off a little at a time over what, at the time, felt like ages.  
  
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 11:03:53 AM
xxx float = icecream soda, i.e. coke float (coke is the brown stuff here), Fanta float, etc
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on November 20, 2013, 11:22:17 AM
xxx float = icecream soda, i.e. coke float (coke is the brown stuff here), Fanta float, etc

Yes Jewel, if you say "float" in this context over here (US), one flavor or another of soda water is added before the word float.

But the Ice Cream Soda is just ice cream, depending on the size of the glass, one or two healthy scoops, and carbonated water. When it carbonated water is added, you get all the bubbles. But, you can also choose which flavor of ice cream you want in the soda.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 20, 2013, 02:48:21 PM
My father worked as a soda jerk at a local drug store during highs school in the early 1940's. He made coke floats, but if he mixed root beer and ice cream it was a Brown Cow.

He said it was the best job he ever had  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 03:17:49 PM
Quote
What do you foreigners call caramels? Are they still a lolly? That just seems so wrong.

Caramels come under the lolly banner but depending on whether they are soft little bundles in paper or hard. Then they become toffee, like the toffee on a toffee apple I guess.

Quote
xxx float = icecream soda, i.e. coke float (coke is the brown stuff here), Fanta float, etc

Because of MacDonald's over here, its more common to hear float but our term for this is a spider. Don't know why.

Our chemists don't have cafes in them but they do sell everything from cough lollies through to packaged gifts of perfume etc.

Buggar is used widely in a few different ways. If I say he is a buggar of a child it means hes naughty but if I say buggar me, I'm surprised. Plain buggar means drat.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 20, 2013, 03:24:04 PM
This is a caramel where I'm from-

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 20, 2013, 03:25:15 PM
My father worked as a soda jerk...

Why was a soda jerk called a jerk?  I've often wondered but never got around to asking.

Gyppo
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 03:28:18 PM
This is a caramel where I'm from-



That one would come under the lolly banner mate. Still be a caramel as well.

What Gyppo said. I have never heard that term before.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 20, 2013, 03:33:50 PM
May I address the phrase "Bless her/his heart"?

Depending on the tone of voice and situation, this phrase can be an expression of sincere sympathy-

"She lost everything to the tornado. Bless her heart."

A way of implying one is stupid-

"She does the best she can. Bless her heart." When used as an insult, it is usually delivered with a dead-pan expression.

Or it can be a term of congratulations.

"you're getting married? Bless your heart!"

Strange, yes?

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 20, 2013, 03:34:31 PM
Why was a soda jerk called a jerk?  I've often wondered but never got around to asking.

Gyppo

Daddy never explained that  :-\
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 03:49:54 PM
That expression is much the same here Laura but just bless her/him.

Bless her/his cotton socks was another.  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 20, 2013, 03:53:53 PM
Do you say "drunker than Cooter Brown"?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 03:55:14 PM
This is a caramel where I'm from-


That's a sweet, here, sub category 'toffee'
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 03:58:27 PM
Do you say "drunker than Cooter Brown"?
No, we don't know Cooter Brown, here.
We would say Drunk as a skunk or Drunk as a lord.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 20, 2013, 03:59:48 PM
Drunk as a BIG dog? (Emphasis is on big)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 04:02:17 PM
LDV in USA or Ute in Oz = bakkie in SA

This is another word derived from Afrikaans - a bak is a container, a bakkie is a small container, but from a Ford bantam to a Ford F750, the car is still a bakkie.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 04:02:49 PM
Drunk as a BIG dog? (Emphasis is on big)
Our dogs don't drink  ;)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 04:04:13 PM
A toffee is also a silly stupid person
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 20, 2013, 04:05:01 PM
The Cornish comedian Jethro introduced us to the saying 'as drunk - or pissed - as a mattress'.  I find it quite accurate.  Trying to move an unconscious drunk is like trying to drag a mattress around.  The mattress is probably easier because you don't worry about hurting it ;-)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 20, 2013, 04:09:12 PM
You can also be sicker than a big dog.

That's probably after you got so drunk.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 04:14:07 PM
We can be sick as a dog; we're not too concerned about its size.

Love the drunk mattress, Gyppo.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 20, 2013, 04:33:32 PM
We also have sick as a parrot.  Don't know why.  I've never seen a parrot being sick.  But I've led a sheltered life so perhaps there's Norwegian Blues throwing up all over the place.  Just never when I'm around to witness the event.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 04:41:38 PM
Do you say "drunker than Cooter Brown"?

Nope, we are drunk as skunks, legless, pissed as nits.... ::) wasted
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 04:45:11 PM
And the day after the night before, you will hear someone say they need a hair of the dog that bit me.

That means a drink of whatever you had the night before to take the hangover away  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 20, 2013, 04:52:32 PM
I believe they were called soda jerks because one had to really jerk a handle to get soda to come forth from the nozzle/container set up.

That could just be a myth, tho.

We can be three sheets to the wind which is drunk. I don't know why.

Of all the things that are slow, apparently molasses in January is the worst.

pissed can mean angry and upset or drunk and I guess you would have to base that entirely on context.

I have heard that in other places "knocked up" doesn't mean you are pregnant, but it does over here.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 20, 2013, 04:54:43 PM
I believe they were called soda jerks because one had to really jerk a handle to get soda to come forth from the nozzle/container set up.



I have heard that in other places "knocked up" doesn't mean you are pregnant, but it does over here.

A co-worker form Scotland told me that when she first came to the US and met with her supervisor she asked him to knock her up in the morning. She meant for him to give her a call and was flabbergasted when someone explained to her why his face turned beet red  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 05:04:17 PM
Knocked up or up the duff mean pregnant here.

We have the molasses thing too.

Three sheets to the wind is drunk here as well and no idea why either Patty  :D

As happy as a pig in mud or shit is as it says.  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 20, 2013, 05:25:03 PM
We can be has happy as a pig in either mud or shit or happy as a clam. I didn't even know that clams cared at all.

flats are shoes here and they do not have high heels on them.

trainers are a word y'all use and I think they mean tennis shoes which are pretty much any shoe that isn't a dress shoe, slipper, flip-flop, sandal, etc.

jumpers are not sweaters, they are a dress/shift thing worn by women with a blouse/shirt under them.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 05:30:03 PM
A jersey is a jumper or cardigan - in the English sense.

The happy pig seems to be universal.

We go to varsity, the rest of the world goes to uni
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 05:32:18 PM
I heard this one was unique...

A 3.5" removable disk was a stiffy as opposed to the 6.25" floppy
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 20, 2013, 05:33:56 PM
The world's thumb drive is a flash drive to us

seems we link computer drives to sex... :P
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on November 20, 2013, 05:44:50 PM
What a marvellous and interesting thread this is. It's the 'bees knees.' FF, I thought the toilet in Oz was called 'the dunny?'

Fags, tabs, coffin nails, = cigarettes (UK)
Roll-up = hand-rolled cigarette (UK)
Roll-up = stocking (US?)
Actually, I've just thought on. Near Mansfield, where I live, 'tabs' are your ears. 'Tuffies' are sweeties. 'Snap' is lunch-pail snacks or light food. In the Northeast, the above 'snap' is called 'bait.' The same 'bait' is the worm or lure you put on a fishing-hook.

Getting back to 'Oz.' I know for a fact that . . . tut tut tut, tut, tut, tut tut tut tut,
tut tut tut tut tut. = "Uncle John's fell down the well and has broken his leg, you'd better come quick if you want to save him. Hurry!" (Dialogue of Skippy the Bush Kangaroo, from the 60's)  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 07:32:35 PM
We call flip flops thongs.

Trainers = runners

Sandals can be slip ons.

High heels and flatties.

A jumper is a knitted all in one as opposed to a cardi (cardigan)

Sloppy joe is a non knitted pull over arrangement made of some sort of brushed material.

Durrie is another cigarette name.

If you lung a dart you are having a smoke.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 20, 2013, 07:49:40 PM
A sloppy Joe here is a sandwich made with browned ground beef, some spices, in a tomato sauce and served on a bun.

(http://www.simplyrecipes.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/sloppy-joe.jpg)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 07:58:51 PM
Ah, you have a different sloppy joe  :D

Your schools over there have cafeteria's too don't they.

We have  a kiosk where sandwiches, pies etc are pre ordered but not a designated room
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mastafrank on November 20, 2013, 08:29:40 PM
Over here tarmac is another word for Airport Apron

RV= Rec Vehicle

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mastafrank on November 20, 2013, 08:31:57 PM
ATV=All Terrain Vehicle....We also use the term 4-wheeler

(https://encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRRlGFuscLnVNqaVV6jeeYKRK83KrQ3Zxt1xLWa7RacwQDVMTMwTQ)

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on November 20, 2013, 08:40:01 PM
Your schools over there have cafeteria's too don't they.

We have  a kiosk where sandwiches, pies etc are pre ordered but not a designated room

It was called the "tuck shop" at my primary school. Maybe the canteen when I was at high school.

PE - was what we called our sports class at school (Phys Ed)

Too lazy to scroll back... so I don't know if you've already covered some of these Fly but:

Tomato Sauce (Ketchup)
Footpath (sidewalk)
Rockmelon (canteloupe)
Capsicum (green/red pepper)
Bum bag (fanny pack)
Having a blue (having a fight)
Fringe (bangs)
Plaits (braids)
Scones (biscuits)

Beanies are knitted winter hats in Oz... the Canucks call them toques ("too-ks")

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 20, 2013, 08:44:05 PM
Ah tuck shop or canteen, I couldn't remember mate, thanks.  :D

Frank tarmac is the same here and an RV is a caravan or motorhome.

Your bike, we call a quad and a wagon you take off road here is a 4 x 4, four wheel drive, fourby. Has a few names.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on November 20, 2013, 08:48:05 PM
Sc,that Sloppy Joe looks gorgeous. I want one. Ff, I said 'dunny,' not 'durry.' xbx
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 21, 2013, 02:38:57 AM
Then there's how we pronounce the words:
barth, grarse, glarse.

Now that you're all trained in sarfeficanism I can write my book without the added stress of internationalising it  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 21, 2013, 03:20:56 AM
 :D :D

I love the way things are mis-pronounced or just plain bad English.

There is a town near here named Rutherford. A lot call it Rudderfud.

Neath = Neaff.

Brisbane = Brisbund. And that one was from a travel agent  :o :o

Oh I could go on..... ;D ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 21, 2013, 04:27:25 AM
Then (hope this is okay to say in this thread) - there is the word "fanny". In the US, it means a person's bottom (and is a totally innocuous word). In the UK, it means a woman's private bits (and, while not exactly rude, is not a word I would use in front of my boss or mother in law). My in-laws were horrified when, in an episode of "Golden Girls", the character Rose ranted, "If she thinks I'm going to kiss her fanny, she's got another think coming!" - I tried to explain the difference in meaning, but they were blushing so furiously I don't think it got through.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 21, 2013, 06:02:12 AM
We were on a Caribbean cruise and one couple at our table was from England. Dorothy who went by Dot with a very pronounced T at the end, was her name and I can't remember his.

Anyway, we were standing on an island somewhere and Dick looked up and said as he spied a helicopter, "Look, over there, a chopper."

Dot looked appalled for a moment and then told us that was a slang term for male anatomy. Everyone was a little embarrassed. It certainly had no connotation like that here.

A chopper is also a specific kind of long front end motorcycle here. But it is not any male parts.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 21, 2013, 06:12:26 AM
A chopper in Oz is either a bike or a helicopter.  :D

Oh dear Amie  :D

I remember the giggle I gave the first time I heard fanny on an American show. It means the same as the UK here.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 21, 2013, 06:47:12 AM
The only Aussie words I know are the ones from Neighbours and this thread :)

Fair dinkum (um... Fair enough?)
This arvo (this afternoon)
The olds (parents?)
Snags (sausages? Hot dogs maybe?)

What about New Zealanders? Must be different again from Australia?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 21, 2013, 06:50:02 AM
Oh wait - I forgot "Ute" (utility vehicle?)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 21, 2013, 07:25:22 AM
Dot looked appalled for a moment and then told us that was a slang term for male anatomy.

I've lived in the UK for about 25 years - in a wide range of geographic locations, from Glasgow to Bristol - and do not commonly hear the word "chopper" to mean a part of the male anatomy. If you said it in context, people would know what you meant, but only in the sense that practically  any word can mean penis (assuming that was the part of the male anatomy Dot and partner meant) in the UK. If I said, "He was standing on the street corner with his wigwams hanging out", people would assume I meant testicles, but it's not a commonly used expression. I wouldn't be surprised if I had heard the word chopper to mean penis, but I can't actually recall an occasion... Most people I know would say "willy" (mums, and women particularly), whereas men might use anything from willy, to John Thomas, to more robust terms. I cannot think of anyone I know who would hear the word "chopper" in that context and automatically think penis. I suspect Dot and partner had some kind of pre-occupation with willies :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 21, 2013, 07:40:35 AM
She had to be in her 50s thirty years ago, so maybe her reference point was different. Could have been a reference to flyboys during the war or something.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 21, 2013, 10:17:48 AM
Ah, okay. Yes, it's true that I'm unlikely to start talking about penises with people in their 80s, so maybe that's why the word doesn't immediately come to mind as part of the vernacular. Come to think of it, if I imagine some guy in his 80s, "chopper" does sound totally natural as a word such a gentleman might use....
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 21, 2013, 10:25:50 AM
I used to love a dish called "potato turbate" when I was a child. In the UK, it's called "cottage pie" if made with beef or "shepherd's pie" if made with lamb.  Much nicer name I think!
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on November 21, 2013, 10:36:07 AM
Around here (US), choppers, especially with the older crowd, would be referring to dentures, false teeth.  ;)

The word, Ute, surprised me when it turned up in this thread.

Ute (strong E) = An American Indian Tribe.

Also

Ute (sounds like Uta) = my German Daughter in Law's name.

I don't think anyone has mentioned:

Ditch = could mean the slight depression on both sides of the road to allow for run off when it rains.

Could also mean getting away from someone or even some place. As in; Let's ditch this place or this person.

Then there is Bar Ditch which would be a deep depression along each side of the road.

I don't here Bar Ditch much any more, but that could be because I don't live in the Texas Panhandle any more where the land is mostly flat and the need for serious drainage is needed when heavy rain storms show up.  



Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 21, 2013, 10:59:47 AM
Now I'm imagining an elderly US couple talking to an elderly UK couple:

Mavis (US octogenarian): I don't know what's got into George these days! Last night he took his choppers out right at the dinner table! In a restaurant!

Mildred (UK octogenarian): he did what?! Did anyone call the police!?!?

Maurice (Mildred's husband): He has two?!?  :o
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Jo Bannister on November 21, 2013, 11:44:07 AM
I had this conversation with my New York publisher.
"You can't call this car a saloon.  Here, a saloon is somewhere you go for a drink.  We call it a sedan."
"Here, a sedan is two guys in powdered wigs carrying a chair!  How about we make it a hatchback?"

Going back to the euphemisms for vomiting, a friend of mine always referred to it as "calling Huey on the great white telephone"!  Which I've always thought particularly descriptive.

And somewhat reminiscent of the pet-name of the Isles of Scilly ferry, which is The Great White Stomach-pump.  Some rough waters off Land's End, you understand.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on November 21, 2013, 12:30:03 PM
Going back to the euphemisms for vomiting, a friend of mine always referred to it as "calling Huey on the great white telephone"!  Which I've always thought particularly descriptive.


We used to say "driving the porcelain bus" :P
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Annmarie on November 21, 2013, 01:03:35 PM
Love this thread.

I just thought about the word sod. That's dirt or seeded grass in my part of the US. It's an insult in other parts, right?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 21, 2013, 01:07:46 PM
I edited my earlier post so that I can point out this fascinating bit of trivia:

Maurice is pronounced MauREECE in the US (at least, where I grew up), but is pronounced MORRis in the UK.

In fact, lots of names are pronounced differently between the UK and US:

US:   BerNARD
UK: BERnerd (they pronounce it 'nerd' even though it's spelled 'nard')

US: SHERRul (usually spelled Cheryl)
UK: CHAIRill (spelled as above)

Now having said lots, I'm struggling to think of more ;)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 21, 2013, 01:08:59 PM
Love this thread.

I just thought about the word sod. That's dirt or seeded grass in my part of the US. It's an insult in other parts, right?

Short for "sodomite" in the UK, and for some reason used to denote an unpleasant person or situation.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on November 21, 2013, 02:21:59 PM
Don't forget 'dobber,' Amie. As in "She dobbed you in." (stool-pigeon) (grass). Bri.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 21, 2013, 02:42:34 PM
It is really difficult to tell what is odd speech when you are the one speaking it. Mine all seems quite normal to me, but you talk funny and there are words that make no sense.

Years ago, I thought Gyppo had had a stroke. He was writing complete gibberish. It made no sense at all. He was using verbs as nouns and then mixing up crap from this sport and that sport together. But then, Daryl answered and Gyppo answered back and I thought it was very odd. So I chimed in, you know how I am, and asked if they were speaking English.

Gyp responded that they were, they just weren't talking American. They were discussing cricket.

Ah, a pitch is a noun in that sport. And one does bat and bowl and it made a little more sense but it was still quite ridiculous to read when one knows very, very, very little about the sport.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 21, 2013, 03:38:27 PM
I remember your bewilderment, Patti.

=====

We used the term chopper for penis when I was at school.  (Mid 50s to late 60s )  Which is why my Hells Angel friend always had a distinctly un-macho fit of schoolboy giggles a few years later when some dizzy little bint would ask "Can I have a ride on your chopper."

To Dad a chopper was a hatchet, for splitting kindling wood, as opposed to a full sized felling axe.  Which is why I nearly wet myself laughing when Dad grumbled about his chopper going rusty when he accidentally left it outside overnight.

Gyppo

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 21, 2013, 03:46:52 PM
Quote
What about New Zealanders? Must be different again from Australia?

Gawd, no one understands them Amie, that's a whole different world over there  ::) ::)

Soots will come on and boot my butt that's a given.  :P :P

There are so many pet names for the old wanger isn't here. I think that's a global thing too.

We have toilet paper, not toilet tissue. Tissues here are paper boxed hankies or handkerchief's.

We don't have forests, we have National Parks or the bush.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on November 21, 2013, 04:28:49 PM
Gawd, no one understands them Amie, that's a whole different world over there  ::) ::)

Soots will come on and boot my butt that's a given.  :P :P

There are so many pet names for the old wanger isn't here. I think that's a global thing too.

We have toilet paper, not toilet tissue. Tissues here are paper boxed hankies or handkerchief's.

We don't have forests, we have National Parks or the bush.



So now that the male genitalia euphemisms are done we get on to the woman's 'Lady-Garden?' I see.  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on November 21, 2013, 04:33:37 PM
I've lived in the UK for about 25 years - in a wide range of geographic locations, from Glasgow to Bristol - and do not commonly hear the word "chopper" to mean a part of the male anatomy. If you said it in context, people would know what you meant, but only in the sense that practically  any word can mean penis (assuming that was the part of the male anatomy Dot and partner meant) in the UK. If I said, "He was standing on the street corner with his wigwams hanging out", people would assume I meant testicles, but it's not a commonly used expression. I wouldn't be surprised if I had heard the word chopper to mean penis, but I can't actually recall an occasion... Most people I know would say "willy" (mums, and women particularly), whereas men might use anything from willy, to John Thomas, to more robust terms. I cannot think of anyone I know who would hear the word "chopper" in that context and automatically think penis. I suspect Dot and partner had some kind of pre-occupation with willies :)

WARNING. Crude language alert!

Written on a shipyard toilet wall, nearly 20 yrs ago. "I'm gonna go home and give my wife 'what for,' (euphemism for sex) with my purple-headed-punisher." And they said romance was dead.  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 21, 2013, 08:29:31 PM
My mother always threatened with, "I'll give you what for...". It means a punishment of some sort.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 21, 2013, 11:51:57 PM
 :D :D

So did mine mate. And the old dragon usually did too.  :o

We are one of those countries that went from pounds, shillings and pence etc to dollars and cents and imperial measurement to metric.

A few quid in the old money was a few pounds. The Pom's will chime in here, I have forgotten a lot of them.

Two bob piece was two shillings?

A tenner was ten pound, a fiver was five pound etc.

If you have a few grand that's a few thousand dollars.

A zac was sixpence

If you were broke, ( no money ) you didn't have a brass razoo  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 22, 2013, 06:58:50 AM
We have forests (lots of trees),
national parks (animals and plantlife protected) and
bush (unspoiled swathes of ground - could be in a national park or across the road from where one lives).
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 22, 2013, 09:12:01 AM
There is no bush in England (brianh, that one is far too easy, so wait for a more challenging opportunity ;) )

Parks, gardens, forests, but no outback or bush. Scrub I guess (could be any untended patch of land I think... I've even heard overgrown car parks in towns referred to as 'scrub'). Wilderness I think does not exist in England either (I mean, the word exists I'm sure, but I've never seen anything that I would consider wilderness. It's all very tended. It's a real shock seeing the difference between the UK from the air and the US - in the US, you can get miles and miles and miles of land that is just wild. In the UK, it's mostly boxes of green fields or urban areas from the sky...)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on November 22, 2013, 10:55:21 AM
:D :D

So did mine mate. And the old dragon usually did too.  :o

We are one of those countries that went from pounds, shillings and pence etc to dollars and cents and imperial measurement to metric.

A few quid in the old money was a few pounds. The Pom's will chime in here, I have forgotten a lot of them.

Two bob piece was two shillings?

A tenner was ten pound, a fiver was five pound etc.

If you have a few grand that's a few thousand dollars.

A zac was sixpence

If you were broke, ( no money ) you didn't have a brass razoo  :D

There's an old song I use to hear that had a line something like this.

"Two bits, four bits, eight bits a dollar."

Two bits = a quarter. I have no idea where or when the "bits" got started.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 22, 2013, 10:59:27 AM
we have dollars and cents.

fin or fiver or fivver is a $5 bill

a picture of Ben or just Ben is a $100 which as Benjamin Franklin on it.

a large or grand or k is $1000 so a house would be like 300 large or 300K  but usually it is smaller numbers so someone might pay 5 grand for a used car.

parks can be trees and flowers or they can have play equipment for kids and you just have to discern what is being talked about.

Bread can be money here, but bread is usually a loaf of something.

a biscuit
(http://www.thefreshloaf.com/files/u22175/biscuits.jpg)

a muffin
(http://www.bulkoils.com/images/products/fragrance/blueberry%20muffin.jpg)

a cupcake
(http://stuffedcupcakes.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/FP.Chocolate.png)

a cookie tray
(http://www.brookshires.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/CookieTray_501-x-349.jpg)

Alice, it was two bits, four bits, six bits, a dollar. Each bit was a quarter and four of them is eight bits or a dollar.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on November 22, 2013, 11:04:45 AM

Quote
Alice, it was two bits, four bits, six bits, a dollar. Each bit was a quarter and four of them is eight bits or a dollar.

Right Patti, I knew (still know actually) that, just left out the 6 bits.  ;)

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 22, 2013, 11:14:32 AM
A word my Dad always used to use (he'd be 86 if he were still alive) was "pill" to mean someone acting like a spoiled brat. I never heard anyone but him and his sister use it. In England, about 20 years ago you'd frequently hear people being referred to as "pillocks" - but not so much today. I gather it meant something like "idiot"
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 22, 2013, 11:19:33 AM
Mind you (this may be contentious and slightly off topic, but) I never hear anyone refer to a child as a spoiled brat these days. I don't know if it's because my friends are too middle class, or if it's just desperately un-PC to give child a negative label for something that some would say is the parents' fault...  I sometimes see child behaving in a way that would have earned the title "spoiled brat" when I was a child, but I never hear anyone use the term. "Challenging" might be the closest.... "used to getting his own way", "not good with sharing", but never "brat" :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on November 22, 2013, 11:24:33 AM
I've heard "pill" used, referring to someone that's being difficult or hard to deal with, especially a child that refuses to listen or shape up and fly right.

Quote
I never hear anyone refer to a child as a spoiled brat these days.

Maybe that's another regional thing Amie . . . I hear it and have often said it myself. But not as often as in days past. Now I take my (inner) frustrations out on the parents that allow such behavior.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 22, 2013, 11:26:00 AM
Might also be a UK - US difference?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 22, 2013, 12:03:21 PM
my parents called us pills when misbehaving.

and pips.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 22, 2013, 03:51:30 PM
Spoiled brat is common here and so is the term feral for unruly kids or their parents.

Aussies tend to drop their g's a lot. Doin, not doing, goin, not going etc. A lot of the modern hip and happening dudes tend to not. But they are a lot softer these days I guess. Men seem to have lost their manliness and are a bit too urban for my liking.

Marijuana is referred to as dope or weed in most cases here, which I think is global.

Police are copper, cops or pigs, which once again, the latter is global.

Our paramedics are ambulance officers and drive an ambulance. We refer to them as ambos.

A good looking person is a spunk, hot, good sort, whereas an ugly or immoral one is usually a bush pig or a car chaser (dog), skank or skanky ho.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Laura H on November 22, 2013, 04:17:45 PM
marijuana = weed

Police is pronounced POlice

paramedics are EMT's

kids can be spoiled brats or spoiled rotten, knee biters or ankle biters

paper money can be bills, give me a dollar bill, but more often than not just the denomination is used, can I borrow a twenty? How bout a fifty? Sometimes paper money is called dead presidents

The only time you ever hear metric terms used in my area is for liter bottles of coke and running races. 5k's are the most popular distance and it seems like every charity has it's own 5k race this time of year to raise money.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 22, 2013, 04:19:50 PM
You dudes even spell litre wrong.  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 22, 2013, 04:20:49 PM
You should hear us pronounce centimeter.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 22, 2013, 04:22:17 PM
 :D :D

It would be an interesting night out Patti. Sitting around a table at the pub, sipping a bevvie and trying to understand one anothers lingo.  ::)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 22, 2013, 04:47:16 PM
I love the way american girls say the word herb.  :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 22, 2013, 04:48:37 PM
 :D :D

And the Kiwi's say six... :P
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 22, 2013, 04:54:47 PM
I love the way american girls say the word herb.  :)

You should hear us say oregano, basil, fillet.... (except I don't pronounce any of those the American way anymore) - you'd be wriggling with delight ;)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 22, 2013, 05:13:15 PM
 :D :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 22, 2013, 05:16:25 PM
how else can you say oregano?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 22, 2013, 05:21:36 PM
Oh boy. Then you want to try understand us at the southern tip of Africa.

Don't like the kiwi 'six:

The canadian 'out' is just as distinctive but I quite like that pronunciation.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 22, 2013, 05:25:50 PM
how else can you say oregano?

Brits say oreGAHno - Americans say oRAYgano
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 22, 2013, 05:28:24 PM
Ah, we say it the same as the Brits then
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 22, 2013, 05:30:00 PM
And, for heaven's sake, don't ask a Brit to pronounce jalapeño, chipotle, (pretty much any Mexican food, they'll get the pronunciation wrong), Maryland, Houston (so many American cities Brits struggle with...)

(in case you're wondering, they pronounce the j as a j and the n as an ordinary n, they say chiPAHTul, Merry-land, WHOston....)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 22, 2013, 07:23:32 PM
Brits say oreGAHno - Americans say oRAYgano

So like the State with a NO on the end? Or is ore just or?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on November 22, 2013, 10:37:53 PM
Just watched a film and the Americans were in Iraq, pronounced I-rack. Y'all talk funny. Not proper, like us. Yuh's knaar worra meen? (damn! Wrong thread.) ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on November 22, 2013, 10:47:28 PM
And, for heaven's sake, don't ask a Brit to pronounce jalapeño, chipotle, (pretty much any Mexican food, they'll get the pronunciation wrong), Maryland, Houston (so many American cities Brits struggle with...)

(in case you're wondering, they pronounce the j as a j and the n as an ordinary n, they say chiPAHTul, Merry-land, WHOston....)

Jalapeno and just about any other Hispanic word has the "J" sounding like
"H".

My younger sister after her marriage had lived on the east coast or once, in Ohio. When her Air Force husband was transferred back to Texas, they both had to get 'reacquainted'  with the place where they were born.

I didn't understand how shallow they had progressed in doing so until one time when I was visiting her she suggested we have lunch at her favorite Mexican Restaurant. I asked the name as we were driving and she said "Josey's."

A minute later she said "There it is" and turned into a parking lot. There was no Josey's in sight.

"Oh, did you mean Josey's?"  Pronouncing it Hosey's, of course.

"No, Josey's," pointing, "right there."

It took a little explaining, but she finally got it.  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 22, 2013, 10:55:33 PM
So like the State with a NO on the end? Or is ore just or?

Or-eh-GAH-no

Similar to Oregon + no, but more "ah" in the third syllable (depending on how you pronounce Oregon in the first place I guess)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 22, 2013, 11:06:31 PM
I remember my first time in a chemistry lab in the UK, I felt like such a dunce. Everything had a different name:

US: CAP-ih-lare-ee tube
UK: cuh-PILL-ah-ree chube

(oh, I forgot - a most 'u's in the UK are pronounced as if there is a 'y' in front of it: duke = dyuke, tube = chube, student = styudent, etc)

US: clamp stand
UK: retort stand (where does 'retort' come from? Do the stands talks back to you over here?)

I was forever having to have additional instruction because I didn't know what anything was, which proved their underlying belief that Americans are desperately under-educated (this was the belief 25 years ago, they've caught up with us since then ;) )
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 22, 2013, 11:45:23 PM
I've never had to be on the other side of the coin and trying to decipher in another country so I can see by your examples Amie, it really is rather difficult. Must be yet another world with a full language barrier.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 23, 2013, 04:10:46 AM
I say jalapeño with a HU sound because I heard it spoken (probably by Americans) before I saw it written down. And I can say Yosemite (some brits who saw before heard say Yoss-er-might.)

But, I think you take things too far. I'm sure Jesus must get pretty annoyed with people saying his name Hay-zoose!
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 23, 2013, 07:58:02 AM
I say jalapeño with a HU sound because I heard it spoken (probably by Americans) before I saw it written down. And I can say Yosemite (some brits who saw before heard say Yoss-er-might.)

But, I think you take things too far. I'm sure Jesus must get pretty annoyed with people saying his name Hay-zoose!

They do in Mexico without issue.  ;D ;D

from another thread, FF, you said "bickies" and I have no idea what those are. Can you put that in American?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 09:15:26 AM
"bickies" are cookies (if it's the same in Australia as UK) - the dry kind, not the chewy kind. Short for biscuits.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 09:19:58 AM
Actually though, looking at it in context (she said "wine + bickies + cheese") I'm wondering if Australian bickies are different from UK bickies. Maybe Australian bickies are more like crackers? (which, I don't eat crackers much, so I'm not sure what the UK term for them is. It might be "crackers"... or maybe it's "biscuits" and you just work it out from context whether they mean sweet or savoury..."crackers" in the UK are also those things you pull on Christmas day, that pop and have a hat, a joke and a prize inside them: http://www.marksandspencer.com/Crackers-Trees-Decorations-Christmas/b/1323242031?extid=ps_ggl_ChristmasShopCrackers_CrackersGeneric&kwid=43828571_Google+Adwords&s_kwcid=AL!2750!3!13339480073!e!!g!!christmas%20crackers&ef_id=wr5OUNkb0jIAAEJe:20131123142239:s)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on November 23, 2013, 10:15:32 AM
"bickies" are cookies (if it's the same in Australia as UK) - the dry kind, not the chewy kind. Short for biscuits.

Absolutely right :D

Fly... a few posts back you mentioned "pigs" being another name for coppers. I had a memory flash of a highway road sign when I was a kid that warned drivers of the possible presence of the Police air patrol. Someone had crossed that out and spray-painted "Pigs In Space" over top :P

Thanks for starting this thread mate. Sometimes I feel like I'm stuck in limbo - not feeling quite Aussie or Canuck. It's good to know I haven't actually forgotten as much Aussie slang as I thought I did ;)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 23, 2013, 10:43:01 AM
... which, I don't eat crackers much, so I'm not sure what the UK term for them is. It might be "crackers"... or maybe it's "biscuits" ...

Biscuits can be sweet or savour and crackers are a subset of savoury biscuits. So you have cheese and biscuits and one (or more) of the types of biscuit in the selection will be crackers. English Uni studes can survive for many months on a box of Ritz crackers.

Can we introduce the French into the mix? They have cheese before the main course rather than after pudding  :o
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 23, 2013, 11:15:25 AM
And we don't have pudding at all.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 11:23:36 AM
And we don't have pudding at all.

I used to have pudding all the time, growing up in Florida. It's a sort of creamy custardy dessert. Brits call it blancmange.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on November 23, 2013, 11:24:41 AM
And we don't have pudding at all.

Some do, else why do all the grocery stores still sell mixes and the ready made?  But I've noticed it's most popular among the older generation.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 23, 2013, 12:09:07 PM
And we don't have pudding at all.

No wonder you are all so angry. All that shouting at each other and invading countries could be avoided if you'd just have a bit of spotted-dick.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 12:19:58 PM
Or sticky toffee pudding. I think that's better for avoiding international conflict than spotted dick.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 23, 2013, 12:26:54 PM
Absolutely. A massive bowl of that with custard washed down with a schooner of sherry and fighting is the last thing on your mind.

Do Americans not have sticky toffee pudding? Or do they have it and call it something like candy grits with sugar jelly?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 12:30:10 PM
I never had sticky toffee pudding as a child, but I may have been deprived.

My mother was always on a diet, so we only ever had sweets if we cooked them ourselves. So, my most common desserts were brownies, chocolate chip cookies and chocolate pudding (blancmange).

I never saw a sticky toffee pudding in a restaurant though. Maybe they had it up in the Northeast, but I don't think it existed in the South.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 23, 2013, 12:32:55 PM
What about Angel Delight, did you have that?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 12:37:35 PM
No. It was the 70s, that was too technologically advanced for us.

I did see soething about 20 years ago that reminded me of Angel Delight though. It was "fat free" instant cool whip. Not really angel delight, but similar in that you add water and it somehow goes all jelly-fluffy. Bizarrely, the "fat-free" mixture was almost 100% hydrogenated vegetable oil - ie, almost 100% fat. I'm amazed you can get away with that kind of mislabelling.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 23, 2013, 01:07:43 PM
We treat spotted dick with penicillin here.

You guys have pudding all the time? I'm lucky if I have some in a pie crust once or twice a year.

Or is pudding your name for dessert? Which is what I thought Mark was saying. This English stuff is hard.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 01:11:15 PM
Pudding is the word for dessert. Unless it's Yorkshire pudding, which is a savoury thing made from batter (flour, milk, egg) baked in a pool of hot fat.

What's your pudding? I can't think of anything called pudding that I'd have in a pie crust.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 23, 2013, 01:15:22 PM
Your are surely not suggesting that Americans do not have Yorkshire pudding?!!!! Next you'll tell me they don't have toad in the hole.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 01:19:48 PM
I think they might have Yorkshire pudding up North. We never had it in Florida. My mother was from Boston, and she made something once called popovers, which was similar, but not really.

I am aware that some people in the US have Toad in the Hole, and they call it "Pigs in a Blanket". we had "Pigs in a Blanket" in Florida, but a very perverse version which involved wrapping ready made biscuit dough (that's biscuit like your savoury scone) around hotdogs and baking them. They were vile.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Don on November 23, 2013, 01:35:50 PM
Houston seems to have multiple pronunciations, even in the U.S.

Houston = Hew'-stun in Texas
Houston = House'-ton in New York (SoHo district- SOuth of HOuston Street)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 01:40:45 PM
There's a Soho in London, but I don't think the name stands for anything...
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 23, 2013, 02:31:36 PM
pudding
(http://mobile-cuisine.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/pudding.jpg)


picture of what Google tells me is Yorkshire pudding
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5f/Yorkshire_Pudding_cooked_in_tin_muffin_tins_2007.6.29.JPG)

two very different things.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 02:33:15 PM
Yes. But in the UK, "pudding" (if not prefaced by the word "Yorkshire") is any kind of dessert.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 23, 2013, 02:57:47 PM
Pudding is the word for dessert. Unless it's Yorkshire pudding, which is a savoury thing made from batter (flour, milk, egg) baked in a pool of hot fat.

What's your pudding? I can't think of anything called pudding that I'd have in a pie crust.

Graham cracker or regular pie crust with a layer of sliced bananas and then banana pudding poured over and topped with whipped cream is banana cream pie.

chocolate pudding with stuff added or not and topped with whipped cream is another type of pie.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 23, 2013, 03:30:59 PM
Spell's right. Those are delicious. They sell crusts made of cookie dough...sort of like a butter cookie, or Lorna Doone, and If you fill that crust with chocolate pudding, top with whipped cream, you've got a great dessert.

Do Brits have pumpkin pie? It could probably be classified as a pudding too.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 23, 2013, 04:10:48 PM
Quote
from another thread, FF, you said "bickies" and I have no idea what those are. Can you put that in American?

Bickies in this instance is crackers Patti but it can be sweet ones as well. If I have a bickie with my coffee, its sweet cause you gotta dunk em mate.  :D

Quote
Fly... a few posts back you mentioned "pigs" being another name for coppers. I had a memory flash of a highway road sign when I was a kid that warned drivers of the possible presence of the Police air patrol. Someone had crossed that out and spray-painted "Pigs In Space" over top Tongue

 :D :D

That made me giggle Sunny, how funny.

Quote
Thanks for starting this thread mate. Sometimes I feel like I'm stuck in limbo - not feeling quite Aussie or Canuck. It's good to know I haven't actually forgotten as much Aussie slang as I thought I did

You're way too Aussie to be a Canuck mate, sorry :P :P

Quote
Or sticky toffee pudding. I think that's better for avoiding international conflict than spotted dick.

We call it sticky date pudding here, almost as bad as spotted dick  :P

So is a Graham cracker sweet then? I often see these called for in a recipe but couldn't fathom which way they were. They look like our digestive biscuits, not really good for much but a base for something more scrumptious.

A pudding in Oz is like a Christmas pudding you pour custard over or bread and butter pudding. We rarely have the other sort you mentioned unless its a creme brulee or such.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 23, 2013, 04:13:30 PM
Do Brits have pumpkin pie? It could probably be classified as a pudding too.

I have made pumpkin pie a few times and it is amazing but we don't have tinned pumpkin over here, you have to cook your own and spice it up accordingly.  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 04:20:27 PM
So is a Graham cracker sweet then? I often see these called for in a recipe but couldn't fathom which way they were. They look like our digestive biscuits,

They are very similar to digestive biscuits. A little bit less sweet and a little bit less crumbly if i remember correctly, but similar enough that you can substitute digestive biscuits for any recipe calling for Graham Crackers.

When I was a child, Graham Crackers were pretty much just eaten by children like regular (sweet) biscuits. I used to love them, which makes me think they are probably sweeter than I remember them :) (children tend to love sweet things, don't they? But I remember them as semi-sweet rather than sweet, like a cookie with half the sugar)

All this fancy schmancy putting them into crusts came later ;) (I'm probably totally wrong about that actually - as I said, my mother didn't cook desserts, so my repertoire was fairly limited. The other kids were probably having banana cream and chocolate pie up the wazoo ;) )
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 04:25:49 PM
Do Brits have pumpkin pie? It could probably be classified as a pudding too.

I have never seen a Brit make pumpkin pie. When I first came to this country, I used to make it from butternut squash (I always hated the tinned Libby's stuff, not that you could get that in the UK anyway), because you couldn't buy fresh pumpkins to eat. They still tend to be bemused by the concept that you can eat them at all, never mind as a sweet.

Butternut squash works really well as a substitute for pumpkin.

In the last ten years or so, you can pie fresh pumpkin (for Halloween, which Brits have also just started to celebrate in the last ten years) - and this year they were really cheap, so I decided to try to make proper pumpkin pie.

Yuck. I don't know if it was the variety of pumpkin, but the flesh was thin, watery and flavourless. Tasted like making pumpkin pie from summer squash.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 04:35:57 PM
Based on this, Graham crackers probably weren't that sweet (or crumbly, being low fat) when I was a child, but might be sweeter these days: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Graham_cracker
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 23, 2013, 04:50:41 PM
Oh dear, they look tasteless in that photo Amie.  :D

Do you guys do carrot cake with cream cheese icing or frosting? That is amazing.  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 23, 2013, 05:03:48 PM
They have a mild malty flavour. It's pleasant, but won't win you Masterchef ;)

I usually make carrot cake with cream cheese frosting. I think that's the usual way in the US. Sometimes I go a bit posh and make it with mascapone ;)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 23, 2013, 05:45:33 PM
We do carrot cake with sour cream frosting in this house. Just made one last week.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on November 23, 2013, 06:02:20 PM
We do carrot cake with sour cream frosting in this house. Just made one last week.

Yum!
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 23, 2013, 06:10:35 PM
With Mum and Dad both being northerners we had puddings after the main course.   What the soft southerners - where we lived - called a dessert.  And the concept of a 'starter' was totally alien to us.  I think the first time I ever had a starter was in my mid twenties, when I took a young lady out to dinner and we had prawn cocktails before the real food.  Really sophisticated stuff ;-)  And so was she ;-)

Sis and I had to grow up bi-lingual, because we had desserts at school and sometimes the exact same thing at home was called pudding.  But whatever it was called we were active little blighters who lived mostly outdoors except when the weather was really bad, so we were usually more than ready to eat it by the time it reached the table ;-)

Gyppo
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 23, 2013, 06:31:48 PM
"starters", haha.,  hors d'ourves., appetizers.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 23, 2013, 06:35:10 PM
hors d'ourves?  horse's doofahs ;-)

Appetisers?  I remember Dad saying "If you need an appetiser then you're not bloody hungry enough to need feeding."
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 23, 2013, 06:40:17 PM
 ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: heidi52 on November 24, 2013, 10:36:04 AM
Coming in late to this great thread.

I live in Massachusetts and no where else on the planet do they call a soft drink a tonic.

Another difference that always baffled me is when someone gets sick or injured
US: the patient is in the hospital
UK: the patient is in hospital

what happened to the 'the'?

The guys who drive the ambulances here are Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs)

anywhere in the US we dial 911 when we have an emergency. What do you guys dial?

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on November 24, 2013, 11:07:29 AM
Back to the punkin pies, something I always enjoyed and still do. But after my first taste of Sweet Potato Pie, my preference changed. Sweet Potato Pie is similar to the punkin pie, but more flavorful IMO.

Oh, but that first taste from a pie made by a woman who really knew what she was doing, was like a taste of heaven.

I was surprised not to see a mention of Bread Pudding too. Thicker than your usual pudding and I have to say, I don't care all that much for most I've had at a restaurant because they insist on pouring a thin sweet sauce over it to serve. I prefer to have a bit a sweet inside the pudding.

I think the bread pudding probably originated as a poor man's dessert because it's a great way to make use of any stale bread you might have tucked away.

With my last pregnancy, I developed a craving for the stuff. So much so that I had to put bread in the oven to dry it out in order to make more every few days.  ;)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 510bhan on November 24, 2013, 11:26:44 AM
Coming in late to this great thread.

I live in Massachusetts and no where else on the planet do they call a soft drink a tonic.

Another difference that always baffled me is when someone gets sick or injured
US: the patient is in the hospital
UK: the patient is in hospital

what happened to the 'the'? Same sort of thing as going to, or being in, school or church or jail . . . no 'the' required.

The guys who drive the ambulances here are Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs)

anywhere in the US we dial 911 when we have an emergency. What do you guys dial?


Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 24, 2013, 11:42:59 AM
anywhere in the US we dial 911 when we have an emergency. What do you guys dial?

In the UK it's 999
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: WordBird on November 24, 2013, 12:25:32 PM
What an fun thread!!

There are so many things I could comment on, but I am distracted by one thing. My grandfather was Welsh (I think). I know very little about him other than that. But I did hear the story that he always wanted a boy named John Thomas. Had no idea why. My dad is the youngest of eight. After having three older brothers and three older sisters, apparently he was able to convince my grandmother without knowing for sure if there would be another boy. She did get pregnant two more times; one died right away, the other was my dad's younger sister. So, hmf, who knew my dad is named after a..........

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 510bhan on November 24, 2013, 12:32:27 PM
what happened to the 'the'? Same sort of thing as going to, or being in, school or church or jail . . . no 'the' required.

I think it's because they are institutions rather than regular residences or places of trade/occupation that the 'the' disappears. ;) Parliament would fall into that category too, yet strangely it would be 'the police' -- always rule breakers, aren't there? ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 24, 2013, 01:07:19 PM
So would an American not say: Hank is in prison?

Q:Were's Hank? He's missing this delightful spotted dick!

A: He's in prison for crimes against puddings.

Putting a "the" in sounds strange.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 24, 2013, 01:29:13 PM
Worry ye not little midlander, Americans do not put "the" in front of jail. Unless it was specific kind of jail, like "the county jail" or "the federal penitentiary"
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 24, 2013, 01:32:07 PM
In that case we've solved Heidi's dilemma. Our hospitals are just like your prisons - lot's of people go in, not many get out alive!
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 24, 2013, 03:19:46 PM

what happened to the 'the'?

The guys who drive the ambulances here are Emergency Medical Technicians (EMTs)

anywhere in the US we dial 911 when we have an emergency. What do you guys dial?



Aussies don't use the 'the' either mate, although at times, I have heard a few.

We carry EMT packs on our trucks, Emergency Medical Treatment packs I think it stands for.

We dial in an emergency 000. BUT because of TV, a lot of people dial 911 as in the US. When we go into the schools to teach kindy kids fire ed, we have to really pump it into their heads to dial 000. At times on the telly, they do a campaign to remind people what to dial. With all the technology today, I don't know why they can't programme the system to accept both, considering the fmistake has let to deaths in the past.

Quote
So, hmf, who knew my dad is named after a..........

 :D :D Oh no, that made me giggle like a schoolgirl.

Quote
I was surprised not to see a mention of Bread Pudding too. Thicker than your usual pudding and I have to say, I don't care all that much for most I've had at a restaurant because they insist on pouring a thin sweet sauce over it to serve. I prefer to have a bit a sweet inside the pudding.


Alice I think the POM's and they will correct me if I'm wrong, have two bread puddings. The bread and butter one I mentioned earlier and a bread pudding. I remember a few years back, Ma was after the recipe from her youth and it was very different to the one I am accustomed to. We pour custard over ours, or ice-cream Nice made with a bottle of sticky wine too.  ;)

I remember as a child jail was spelt gaol but Americanisms have taken over and its rarely seen that way anymore.

If you are in gaol or jail, you are in the boob, clink, slammer, big house, visiting Bubba, up the river.

The new maximum security gaol here is way nicer then our hospital. Its even air-conditioned. The minimum security doesn't even have glass in the window.  :D

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 25, 2013, 01:00:34 AM
hors d'ourves?  horse's doofahs ;-)
Faux pas = foxes paws.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 26, 2013, 05:14:05 PM
Reminded of this by another thread: in the US, a "yard" is a lawn. In the UK I gather a yard is paved or concreted, it won't have a lawn or flowers.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 26, 2013, 10:13:19 PM
We have a backyard and a frontyard over here mate, usually lawn but never a real definition. Just your turf I guess.

Another thing that is said a lot over here if blokes or sheilas are looking at the opposite sex is to say we are perving on a spunk.  :o
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 26, 2013, 10:24:24 PM
I love that "perving on a spunk".
Great phrase.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 26, 2013, 10:47:08 PM
Another thing that is said a lot over here if blokes or sheilas are looking at the opposite sex is to say we are perving on a spunk.  :o

Where is Mark H when you need him?

"perving on a spunk" sounds like something that would happen in a porn film in the UK. Spunk = semen. When Americans describe someone as "spunky" (full of fight and determination and spirit), it always gets a few raised eyebrows in the UK. Similarly, when Australians describe a good looking man as "a real spunk", it always gets a few titters.

Just checking: does "perving" have the same meaning in all three countries? I would take it to mean either a) getting all hot and bothered about someone or b) touching someone or leering at someone in an inappropriately sexual way. Could possibly be extended to cover inappropriate sexually provocative comments.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 26, 2013, 11:43:35 PM
 :D :D

If you perv, you are looking really. But then again there is the dirty old perv which isn't something you want to be on either side of.

Spunk = semen.

Spunky = hot/cute/sexy

Spunk bubble = same as above

Full of spunk can = full of fight/determination/spirit.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 27, 2013, 02:35:07 AM
Where is Mark H when you need him?

In the park, spunking on a perv.

Yards. We never use it in the sense of a front or rear garden. Even if we paved the back garden it would still be the back garden. In the UK a yard is adjacent to buildings and has some utilitarian function, for example the stable yard.

Of course we have millions of courtyards and a small number of those are even near a court.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 27, 2013, 03:21:51 AM
Yards. We never use it in the sense of a front or rear garden. Even if we paved the back garden it would still be the back garden. In the UK a yard is adjacent to buildings and has some utilitarian function, for example the stable yard.

Of course we have millions of courtyards and a small number of those are even near a court.

Ah, I probably got confused. It's another word I don't use very often. When I first came to the UK (1987, Leeds) I think I made some reference to our front yard or back yard, and whoever it was said, "We only call it a yard if it's paved", so I thought it applied to paved areas attached to houses as well.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 27, 2013, 03:38:31 AM
In the park, spunking on a perv.



Exactly where we thought you would be mate.  :D :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 27, 2013, 03:51:32 AM
Amie/Fly

Do Americans/Australians not use garden ever?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 27, 2013, 04:44:03 AM
Garden in America suggests lots of plants and flowers, besides grass - boxe hedges and rosh bushes and that sort of thing. If it was mainly lawn, I think people would call it a lawn or yard. If the plants were sort of haphazard and hadn't been planted deliberately (is, the odd tree), then you'd probably call it a yard.

Garden suggests something fairly formal in the US (if the usage is the same as it was 25 years ago)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: mouselady on November 27, 2013, 05:36:11 AM
What a fun thread!

Shortly after I arrived in Yorkshire in 1986, I started talking about dogs with a colleague. I couldn't understand why she started laughing when I said the family dog was named Taffy.

I was working in Sheffield. Little did I know that particular colleague was Welsh*.   :D




*I was and am useless at British accents. Even more useless then, than now.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DGSquared on November 27, 2013, 05:39:54 AM
Since Mark asked about US gardens, I'll throw in my two bucks worth.

There are different kinds of gardens and gardeners in the US.

You've got your flower gardens, herb gardens - the legal and the illegal kind, and there are still quite a few folks that still enjoy their very own vegetable gardens - though that is becoming more and more rare as urban sprawl decays the landscape.

There are those who like to keep well manicured, green lawn. I think some people are becoming conscious of the fact that a lush green yard just for the sake of looks in the chaparral or desert climate of Southern California is by and large a monumental waste of water. However, people still feel the need to keep up their arrogance appearances even at the cost of sucking every river dry.

When I was a youngster my West Virginia grandparents had a two acre vegetable garden that the entire family would plant after the last frost and harvest in the summer. My grandmother, mother, and aunts spent the following weekends canning what wouldn't keep like delicious dill pickles, green beans, corn, yams, carrots, and squash. We grew onions, scallions, potatoes, and shucked and ate lots of corn on the cob. A tasty, beefy, red tomato slice adorned every plate at supper time. They also had a long grape arbor and a few apple trees on the property. Strawberries were planted but blackberries grew wild. We used to barter for butter, milk, eggs, and buttermilk with a sweet elderly couple who lived down the holler. We affectionately called them Maw and Paw Crawford.

That way of living was considered a throwback for the most part when I was a kid. I'm thankful for those days and for the opportunity to taste real flavorful food -pesticide and herbicide free.

Since we don't have room for a vegetable garden here, I like to grow native wild flowers to keep the hummingbirds and butterflies around.

I digress...
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 27, 2013, 05:44:37 AM
I remember being very puzzled by a reference in an American book to 'taffy pulling'.

Why the ultra-wholesome 'Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm' type girls were suddenly talking about hunting for a Welsh Bedmate I had no idea ;-)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DGSquared on November 27, 2013, 06:12:17 AM
**Warning** Crass and crude** Continue at your own risk of being offended or grossed out. ::)

I personally do not use these sayings but I know people who have made these references on occasion.

When we Americans ask if anyone is on the throne, we don't expect to find royalty in the loo. :o

Where's Dad?

He's on the throne.

Or this one is an awful bit of American slang:

He's dropping the kids off at the pool.
Also known as, taking a dump. Though you are actually leaving one. I never understood the sense in that.
Another way to say, pinching a loaf.

If the contents of your stomach are making a U-turn and you must 'upchuck' we have these colorful phrases:

He had a meeting with Ralph.
He bought a Buick.
He's praying to the porcelain Gods.


Ones we used when I was a teenager:

Let's go throw a munch.  8)
Let's get something to eat.

Or,
I threw a mean munch.
I was really hungry and ate a lot.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 27, 2013, 06:30:47 AM
Amie/Fly

Do Americans/Australians not use garden ever?


Similar to Amie I guess Mark. A garden is where something other then lawn grows. I have a backyard with a garden around the outside. I have a herb garden I grow in tubs. But the lawned area is just the yard.

Deb a lot of that toilet humour we have here to. Take a bog. Snap one off. Us civilized folk just duck to the loo.  :P :P

Boys would say they were going to point Percy at the porcelain.  :D

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 27, 2013, 06:36:28 AM
Do colonials ever have to "go and turn the bike round"?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 27, 2013, 06:37:46 AM
Do colonials ever have to "go and turn the bike round"?
This colonial has no idea what you're talking about.  :o
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DGSquared on November 27, 2013, 06:39:47 AM
Do colonials ever have to "go and turn the bike round"?

is that the same as chasing tail? ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 27, 2013, 06:44:25 AM
I don't think so. I assume chasing tail would happen prior to a game of Titty Cricket, whereas you'd not need to turn your bike round until it was time to have a few sherbets.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 27, 2013, 06:56:11 AM
is that the same as chasing tail? ;D
If I'm chasing tail, I'm running around in circles, disorganised and not getting things done.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 27, 2013, 07:07:01 AM
and I found this today.

http://mentalfloss.com/article/12843/19-confounding-discrepancies-between-american-english-and-british-english
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 27, 2013, 07:20:05 AM
Can someone tell me what, specifically, a condominium is. How is it different to an apartment?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 27, 2013, 07:22:52 AM
Apartments are owned by one person/entity and usually occupied by renters while condos are owned by a bunch of different people even tho they are one building.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 27, 2013, 07:35:38 AM
We used to call apartments flats years ago. Now the are called units. I always thought it sounded much classier to have an apartment then a flat  :D

Do colonials ever have to "go and turn the bike round"?

Never heard that one before Mark, sorry.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 27, 2013, 07:38:03 AM
Apartments are owned by one person/entity and usually occupied by renters while condos are owned by a bunch of different people even tho they are one building.

You mean like time-share? So 12 people own the property and get to use it for a month/year each?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 27, 2013, 07:43:08 AM
No, apartments are large buildings owned by one person and rented out to several families who live there year round.

Condos can be time shares and then so many people pay for the individual place but intend to only use it a certain number of days/weeks per year. Condos can also be just like apartments except instead of one person owning the whole building, each unit is individually owned.

However, if it is upscale enough, they go back to being called apartments. So John Lennon lived in an apartment at the Dakota even tho in most other places in the US that would have been called a condo. Just because.... I don't know why. He owned the place so it isn't really an apartment except the Dakota was built in the days before there WERE condos so maybe they just kept the name they always had.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 27, 2013, 07:55:00 AM
Can someone tell me what, specifically, a condominium is. How is it different to an apartment?

I still believe a condominium is a condom made from aluminium.  If it's not it damned well should be ;-)

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 27, 2013, 07:56:06 AM
That sounds painful from both sides. <shudder>
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on November 27, 2013, 08:01:08 AM
Fly - for some reason this phrase came into my head yesterday. Ever referred to someone or something as giving you "the shits"?

For the rest of you... it has not so much to do with an unfortunate bowel situation as how annoyed you are with that person or thing  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 27, 2013, 08:23:29 AM
We draw the line before we reach solids ;-)  In that situation someone just 'pisses us off'.

On the other hand a person or situation which bothers/scares us, usually because they're odd or a bit 'dark' - not referring to skin colour here but a dark 'presence' - is described as 'giving me the willies', or 'putting the willies up me'.  Example:  "Walking down that stretch of road at night puts the willies up me."
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 27, 2013, 08:24:55 AM
We also have "He really gets my goat."  No idea why.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 27, 2013, 08:26:44 AM
Yep, all of the above Sunny and Gyp.Its usually bosses that give you the shits though isn't it  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 27, 2013, 08:32:44 AM
Does anyplace other than Australia refer to their female population as sheilas? And what is the origin for that?

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 27, 2013, 08:35:05 AM
Yep, all of the above Sunny and Gyp.Its usually bosses that give you the shits though isn't it  :D

I fell out with my boss the other day, but we soon settled it.  Sometimes he's a complete bastard and other times he's too easy-going.  We rarely get it just right, but we're stuck with each other.  One of the curses of being self-employed ;-)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on November 27, 2013, 09:15:17 AM
Taffy pull . . . better have your hands buttered up good because that taffy is hot. But if you fail to pull it while it's hot you'll wind up with a ball or large glob of hard candy that's not that easy to enjoy.

To pull taffy it's easier to do with two people. Much laughing goes one as well as taking a few quick breaks to run cold water over your hands before you can finish pulling.  :)

On the bathroom humor (or not so funny sometimes), it's not unusual to hear someone refer to the bathroom itself as "the John" regardless of what they intend to do there. My ex was fond of saying that he was going to "drain" his radiator - and he wasn't talking about the one on the car.

He was originally from New York state, maybe he picked it up there.

Snow Birds in the southern US isn't a reference to two legged, feathered critters that fly and have no aversion to the snow. They are people who live in the northern, colder parts of the US that migrate to the warmer south during winter time. Now days many of the Snow Birds own an apartment/condo, house or even a small ranch in the south and rent them out when they head back Home in the Spring or Summer time.

Cotton Picker use to mean a person that actually picked cotton out in the field and was paid by the pound for how much they picked.

Today you can hear Cotton Picker or Cotton Picking this or that when some task is tedious is tedious or giving you fits. = "That cotton picking bolt is rusted in place. Get me the hammer."

 

 

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: heidi52 on November 27, 2013, 09:39:51 AM
It used to be that apartments were rental units and condominiums were owned units, lived in usually by the people who own them but not all. In an apratment building the owner (landlord) is responsible for upkeep and maintenance. In a condominium you have an association and each owner has to pay for a share of all maintenance expenses.

I live in a single family house and the area surrounding the house is the yard, divided into front yard and back. Both yards are a mix of lawn and trees and flower beds. The garden is a fenced in area in the back yard where the vegetables and herbs are grown.

When I lived in various apartments in the city, I always thought "flat" sounded so elegant.  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 27, 2013, 12:50:31 PM
Fly - for some reason this phrase came into my head yesterday. Ever referred to someone or something as giving you "the shits"?

For the rest of you... it has not so much to do with an unfortunate bowel situation as how annoyed you are with that person or thing  ;D

I think in the UK it means to frighten someone. They can also be "shit scared"
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 510bhan on November 27, 2013, 12:51:55 PM
I understand somebody to be 'fly' if they are sneaky or try to take advantage of a situation in a underhand way.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on November 27, 2013, 12:53:55 PM
I think in the UK it means to frighten someone. They can also be "shit scared"

Yes - shit scared is another one :D

I can't remember the origin of the word 'sheila' (or bloke for the guys). They just always were 'there' in our vocabulary growing up.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 27, 2013, 01:13:01 PM
we can be scared shitless
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on November 27, 2013, 01:34:16 PM
we can be scared shitless

Was that when Bushy was in power?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 27, 2013, 04:13:32 PM
I haven't really liked a President since Eisenhower and that was because I was too young to know much with him. The current guy is just as bad, but he smirks nicer.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 27, 2013, 04:16:22 PM
Does anyplace other than Australia refer to their female population as sheilas? And what is the origin for that?



No mate, I can't remember either but you aren't a sheila till you are a teenager, before that, you are a girl.  :D

We say scared shitless over this way too.

Holy crap, if you are surprised or caught off guard.

Get a wriggle
on if you want someone to hurry

Heard one of the guys say the other day, "Mate, lets hit the frog and toad and walk up the stree and perv on some hot sheilas. "

Made me giggle cause you expect that from older blokes, not youngens.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: wanderer on November 27, 2013, 05:11:24 PM
Here is an interesting video showing American speech variations: http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2013/11/27/charming-video-maps-many-dialects-american-english/?intcmp=features (http://www.foxnews.com/travel/2013/11/27/charming-video-maps-many-dialects-american-english/?intcmp=features)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 28, 2013, 12:26:09 AM
My Holiday is US Vacation

We used to say 'Nappies', but I notice the current generation of parents of babies use 'Diapers' - must be the TV influence.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 28, 2013, 06:35:30 AM
Its still nappies here or disposables.No more cloth ones I'm afraid  ???
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on November 28, 2013, 09:43:46 AM
Its still nappies here or disposables.No more cloth ones I'm afraid  ???


Oh, the cloth ones are still around - it's crazy how much they've evolved since I first saw them in the 70s :P I flipped between calling them diapers and nappies when we had them in the house (and I did end up using both cloth and disposable for both kids).

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on November 28, 2013, 01:07:12 PM
I can still fold a cotton nappy, 25 years after I last needed to.  But Alma uses disposables.

I used to be able to do the origami fold which made a normal size cotton nappy small enough for extra-little babies, but I can't remember how mow.  I do remember it used to look wrong, then you pulled a couple of corners and there it was.  Like paper origami there was something almost magical about it, a conjuring trick at the very least.

=====

Returning to how we say things.  We sometimes still say someone - male or female - has 'taken a lech' to someone.  Derived from that wonderfully old-fashioned word lechery.  But this is only for those with straightforward carnal desire running through their veins.  It's not for the 'love-sick' who tremulously worship from afar, and would probably mess themselves with abject terror if the object of their impossibly idealised affection actually stopped and spoke to them.

Gyppo
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on November 28, 2013, 02:27:49 PM
The word "bespoke", as in "made to order", does not exist in the US. At least, it didn't exist when I lived there, and my husband says none of his US colleagues know the word either.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 28, 2013, 03:49:41 PM
Today its raining here. There are numerous ways of explaining that away too.

Its raining cats and dogs

Its pissing down

Just a bit of drizzle

When its windy:

Blowing a gale

Blow a dog of his chain

Blowing hard enough to blow your hair off
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on November 28, 2013, 04:07:36 PM
'Bespoke' is familiar to me but probably because I read so much British literature.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 510bhan on November 28, 2013, 04:31:56 PM
Twigging/twigged [on] something -- same as catching on, understanding the nuance or innuendo.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on November 28, 2013, 09:23:36 PM
We have twigged here too.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on November 29, 2013, 07:04:36 AM
I was actually able to use this thread's information to impress my children yet again. There were so many phrases they didn't know since they aren't as international as their mother.

Joe still doesn't believe the word arvo has anything to do with reality.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on November 29, 2013, 07:48:00 AM
The Oz 'arvo' was my 'arvie' when I lived in Zimbabwe.

But, it was not used to denote any afternoon - mostly there was one word - thisarvie for today, tomorrow was rarely tomorrow arvie, usually tomorrow afternoon.
 
SA doesn't have any contraction for afternoon.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on December 01, 2013, 01:52:21 AM
Its rare for us to say afternoon at all. Well maybe the newer generations may but I haven't noticed it.

Glad we have been able to assist you in educating your sons mate, we aim to please.  ::)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mastafrank on December 04, 2013, 03:49:51 AM
North America we use the word sick wheras in the UK they use the word 'poorly'
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on December 04, 2013, 04:18:00 AM
Saying goodbye is a whole different thing everywhere as well.

Most times here its see ya or see ya later.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on December 04, 2013, 04:26:26 AM
North America we use the word sick wheras in the UK they use the word 'poorly'

Not really. Poorly is a bit old fashioned and more commonly used when referring to children or coffin-dodgers. Sick is now very common (in every sense) whereas the appropriate English term would be ill.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on December 04, 2013, 06:05:05 AM
Might be a UK regional difference, but I only hear people say "sick" if they mean vomiting. They say "ill" otherwise. Old people and northerners sometimes say "poorly".
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on December 04, 2013, 08:00:03 AM
Here in the South, people are poorly as well. Although I'm damned Yankee and only get sick. I use ill rarely, but poorly - never.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on December 04, 2013, 08:01:06 AM
And another thought.

We are all considered Yankees over here by the outside world. But in the south, the Yankees are from the north. And a damned Yankee comes south and buys property or real estate.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mark H on December 04, 2013, 08:34:35 AM
And another thought.

We are all considered Yankees over here by the outside world. But in the south, the Yankees are from the north. And a damned Yankee comes south and buys property or real estate.

We know more than you think. For example, aren't all the people form the southern states Red Necks?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on December 04, 2013, 09:06:22 AM
That might be a bit of an overstatement. A bunch of people now living in the south are really Yankees and damn Yankees.  ;D ;D ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on December 04, 2013, 11:15:53 AM
I thought Rooinekke (Red Necks) were the English in Africa.

In SA we get sick.
Very
Mostly in the head  :o
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 2par on December 04, 2013, 11:21:17 AM
Rednecks drive trucks, wear baseball caps, have a bunch of dirty kids, drink a lot, etc.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Foxy on December 04, 2013, 01:12:55 PM
Rednecks drive trucks, wear baseball caps, have a bunch of dirty kids, drink a lot, etc.


And they all believe in reintarnation after they die.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on December 04, 2013, 02:02:45 PM
We mostly get crook as a dog in Oz but have been known to be sick occasionally. Ill is used sometimes and no one ever feels poorly. It is a very old word isn't it.   :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Jo Bannister on December 04, 2013, 02:14:29 PM
I'm rather attached to sicky bad.  I'm not sure if it's an entirely Northern Irish expression, although I never met with it in England.  It describes someone who's worse than just unwell but probably not at death's door.  Gastric flu, for instance.  If you're sicky bad, you'll probably spend some time calling Huey on the great white telephone.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on December 04, 2013, 03:11:08 PM
Originally, a Redneck was someone who worked outdoors doing manual labor. The heat in the south lasts so much longer that in the north, so they had a sunburned (red) neck most of the year.

Over time the term came to be a put down for the behavior and/or lack of civility in behavior.

Similar to the Redneck tag, we also have Cedar Choppers which are often seen to be beneath the Rednecks.

Don't ask me the difference, for an outside view, the difference is slight if it exists at all.

   
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on December 04, 2013, 03:36:20 PM
Housos is the expression for a redneck here mate.

Interesting to hear the original redneck though, never woulda thought that in a million years.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Chizzy on December 04, 2013, 03:51:44 PM
I've been working in the midwest in the US for around 18 months now and my plan to introduce the word "fortnight" into the lexicon has so far been futile. I've also had strange looks from saying midday rather than noon, rubbish rather than garbage or trash. This is further confused by being Scottish so when I say I'm going to the shops for the messages, I have to translate that into UK English and then US English to be understood.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on December 04, 2013, 04:21:13 PM
This is further confused by being Scottish so when I say I'm going to the shops for the messages...

Until I met this expression recently in one of the Rebus books it would have thrown me too.  We go to the shops for shopping.  Mind you, forty or more years back those with no fixed abode would drop in at the post Office to see if there were any messages left for then using the Poste Restante system.  Quite useful for those who travelled a regular circuit.   Apparently it still exists, and is used now by travelling businessmen and other 'Road Warriors'.  Not everything can be handled by internet. 

Fifty years back, when we were cycle touring, we sent clean clothes on ahead - before we left home - to a few selected points on our route, to avoid carrying any more than we needed.  The dirty stuff was bundled up and sent back home, where we'd find it waiting ready for a big wash-up.

Gyppo
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on December 04, 2013, 05:44:58 PM
I remember mum always went for messages when I was young but not heard that in a long while.

Quote
I've been working in the midwest in the US for around 18 months now and my plan to introduce the word "fortnight" into the lexicon has so far been futile

Chiz, what is the difficulty with fortnight, is it the context or what mate? I thought it was pretty much global.

Noon we use rarely, more midday and never trash, always garbage.

Gyp I know a lot of travellers here in Oz send stuff or have it sent to different Post Offices for collection on the way through.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on December 04, 2013, 05:53:47 PM
I don't know how many people over here even know a fortnight is two weeks, but we don't really use score to mean twenty either unless we are quoting Lincoln.

We do things in days or weeks or months and aren't really all that interested in a two syllable word.  :D

I'm trying to decipher the whole going to shop for messages and I guess from follow up posts it means going to the post office for mail, but I would have never guessed that at all without the following clues so maybe it doesn't mean that for the Scots here.

A lot of usage for regular words that change meaning in different countries are things I get out of context but am never quite sure if I'm really right. I wish I had said something yesterday when I saw another one of those foreign usage things. But I can't remember where on here I saw it. Next time, I'm going to copy and paste.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Chizzy on December 04, 2013, 05:55:58 PM
Like SC says, it just doesn't seem to be a term anyone's heard of and even when used in clear context (I'm going on vacation for a fortnight) it still seems to cause confusion.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on December 04, 2013, 06:04:46 PM
Quote
I'm trying to decipher the whole going to shop for messages and I guess from follow up posts it means going to the post office for mail,

In my mums speak, it meant going up town to do what was on her list eg: go to the chemist, post a letter, get groceries.

Like SC says, it just doesn't seem to be a term anyone's heard of and even when used in clear context (I'm going on vacation for a fortnight) it still seems to cause confusion.

Just goes to show how different things can be. I get amazed a bit on this thread with each countries preference.  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 510bhan on December 04, 2013, 06:08:15 PM
Over here when someone says they are 'starving' it's usually referring to the effects of cold weather. I'm starving, it'd skin a fairy out there today.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on December 04, 2013, 06:09:22 PM
are fairies what we call leprechauns?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 510bhan on December 04, 2013, 06:11:37 PM
Oh no there's a whole classification of little people, good and bad. ;)

Also, if you're cold, you would say you were 'foundered'.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on December 04, 2013, 06:13:53 PM
Starving here is hungry.

Cold we usually say we are freezing or its cold enough to freeze the balls off a billiard table/brass monkey  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 510bhan on December 04, 2013, 06:15:40 PM
We would tend to say famished rather than starving.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on December 04, 2013, 07:14:00 PM
Not heard it used in years now, but Southern English for cold when I was a kid was sometimes shrammed.  Here's the wiki explanation.

Adjective[edit]

shrammed (comparative more shrammed, superlative most shrammed)
(dialect, Southern UK) Of a person, cold (in temperature); shrivelled with cold.
There was a bitter wind and she looked shrammed in her thin dress.


The last person I recall using it was our local poacher - a real character - who used to sit on the wall sometimes eating his fish and chips and tell stories to semi-worshipping kids.

"That night I was so bloody shrammed I wanted a copper to arrest me.  Even the cells would have been warmer.   But, as always, you can never find one when you want one."

Good old Ken.  He's probably climbed over the wall into that great shooting estate in the sky by now.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on December 04, 2013, 07:22:16 PM
Talking of hungry.  Gran, a Yorkshire woman, would say "I'm so hungry mi stomach thinks mi throat's bin cut."

And she'd never say someone had a big mouth if they talked too much.

"Eeh, that Elsie Higginbottom has such a small face."

About a particularly snooty 'nose in the air' neighbour.  "If her nose gets much higher happen she'll drown if it rains."

Gyppo
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on December 04, 2013, 07:26:31 PM
Talking of hungry.  Gran, a Yorkshire woman, would say "I'm so hungry mi stomach thinks mi throat's bin cut."

I still hear that one from time to time. Another one for being really hungry is;  "I'm so hungry I could eat a horse." Occasionally someone might add . . . "shoes and all."
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on December 04, 2013, 07:29:54 PM
Dad used to say "I'm so hungry I could eat a scabby rat."  I think it was one of his naval sayings.  If extra hungry he'd occasionally ad,d and the tail.

He eventually stopped saying it in front of Mum because the mere thought of it made her gag.  He was good like that.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on December 04, 2013, 07:55:58 PM
Often used here, I'm so hungry I could eat the fork out of a low flying duck. Usually a bloke thing at the pub.  :o

Quote
Eeh, that Elsie Higginbottom has such a small face."
..

 ;D ;D

I love that one.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on December 04, 2013, 08:21:14 PM
It's become part of the family 'shorthand'.

If some stranger seems a bit mouthy one of us will look at the other and say "Small face?"

Gyppo
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Hippyhighway on December 05, 2013, 12:52:25 PM
Having moved from Ireland to England I had a few people looking blank at me on occasion.

The jacks Ireland is the bog in England. But the bog in Ireland is where we get turf or peat from to burn on the fire.
The craic (pron: crack) is having a great time.

Oh, and then last year on a popular TV talent show an American judge told the contestant they had great spunk, which I believe in America means spirit and drive.  Over here in the UK it means something entirely different. ;D 

Whilst on anatomy I remember when the bum bag first came over from America we thought you had to wear it with the pouches around your back on your bum!  ???
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on December 05, 2013, 01:10:45 PM
Isn't a bum bag called a fanny pack in the US?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on December 05, 2013, 01:45:33 PM
Isn't a bum bag called a fanny pack in the US?

You are very right Amie.  ;)

Even I, born and raised Texan found that a strange name for something that was actually worn in front and often buckled at the side.  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on December 05, 2013, 02:11:10 PM
Its a bum bag over here
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on December 05, 2013, 02:39:32 PM
Even I, born and raised Texan found that a strange name for something that was actually worn in front and often buckled at the side.  ;D

Ironically, that would make the name more appropriate in the UK...
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on December 06, 2013, 10:08:00 AM
When someone farted loudly down the Pit, they'd look proudly at the other guys in triumph. It was seen as a great exploit down there. But people often after farting would then say, "More tea Vicar?" Which I found amusing. But I found out recently that there was an answer to it, "No thanks, it makes me fart." I have to tell you's, when I heard that I fell about. It was so funny to me. Do the rest of the World do/say anything similar? I know the Americans call it 'cutting the cheese.' Bri.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Tim Riddle on December 06, 2013, 01:23:50 PM
Here's a funny chain email with some Regular English compared to Trinidadian English.
Well, funny for me, probably confusing for you, good luck trying to understand anything.

Regular: Aren't those pants a bit short?
TnT: Yuh expekin flood or wha?

Regular: Sir, please don't throw my luggage like that.
TnT: Buh wha trouble is dis? Boy stop flingin meh grip so.

Regular: Lift the hood of the car for me John.
TnT: Yute-man, fly de bonnet nuh!

Regular: I love you girl. 
TnT: Ah rell check fuh yuh, yuh done know.


Regular: I have a stomach ache. 
TnT: Oh gorm.............. meh belly gripein meh.

Regular: He has no manners. 
TnT: He doh have no broughtupcy.

Regular: WOW!........... he has such a bad body odor 
TnT: Yuh doesn't bade?....... oh shims man...... yuh smellin stink!

Regular: Josh is suffering from Attention Deficit Disorder. 
TnT: Dat chile too dam harden.

Regular: It's been a long time since I've seen you girl. 
TnT: A.. A...! You still alive gyul?

Regular: Oh my goodness, we have lost electricity. 
TnT: Jeezanages!!...... current gorn again.

Regular: Here Kitty kitty.. get down from the roof.
TnT: Ey yuh ole dutty stinkin cyat, come off de bleddy gyalvanize before ah drop two stone in yuh tail!
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Amie on December 06, 2013, 01:43:37 PM
Brilliant!! For some reason it reminds me of a Geordie (Newcastle) accent.

Particularly love "broughtupcy" ;D

When I was in school (in Florida) we called trousers that were a bit short "high waters" (for the same flood reason)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on December 06, 2013, 01:57:04 PM
broughtupcy was my favorite thing, too.

It is perfect.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on December 06, 2013, 01:58:41 PM
It reminds me of Geordie too Amie. Not Mackum. Mackum speekers are so 'refeined.' ha ha. B
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Spell Chick on December 06, 2013, 02:46:44 PM
So Brian has a fair with lots of noise and hooters.

Over here, hooters are boobs. Not the dumb kind but the baby feeding kind.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on December 06, 2013, 09:23:08 PM
Hooters the same here to mate.

If trousers/skirt are too short there is a saying along the lines of your shoes are having a party, why don't you invite your trousers/skirt down

If someone is just plain stingy, tighter than a fishes arse and that's water tight.



Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on December 07, 2013, 04:25:26 AM
We say tighter than a duck's arse.

"If you spread jam on your shoes maybe your trousers would come to tea."
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 11, 2014, 09:28:19 AM
So what does a silly old twit/twat mean in your country?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: heidi52 on February 11, 2014, 09:35:13 AM
twit is the same, but twat is girlie bits  :o :o

quite naughty here.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: heidi52 on February 11, 2014, 09:36:26 AM
pants too short here are "high waters"
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 11, 2014, 09:37:43 AM
See twit and twat mean the same here, good strong meanings really.

But a twit in the dictonary used to be a pregnant sparrow  :o
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: LucyLastic on February 11, 2014, 10:32:46 AM
A twit or twitface is a twerp

Twat, same thing
or
what you might call a mappa tassie
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 11, 2014, 11:02:10 AM
We do get a few 'vulva's on here lately.  ;D

Seen this one a few times here. What exactly is a, 'root beer?' B
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on February 11, 2014, 12:11:55 PM
Root Beer is a soft drink, soda or pop - depending on your local. When poured in a glass or mug, you get a nice foamy head on it.

On a hot summer day, a Root Beer Float is something to be treasured.  :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: heidi52 on February 11, 2014, 01:18:40 PM
It was originally made with the root of the sasparilla (Sassafrass tree).  Hence "root beer" had very little alcohol, but it was slightly fermented which gave it bubbles. It also could contain birch (twigs), anise (seeds), juniper (berries), vanilla (seed pods) and wintergreen (berries).


Now it's made with artifical syrup and carbon dioxide.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: ericthehalfabee on February 11, 2014, 01:34:46 PM
Possible swearing!!


Can I just ask about 'pissed'. It seems to have a lot milder use in the U.S. but my kids are horrified and laugh their heads off when it's used in normally PC sitcoms like 'friends'. We say 'pissed off' to say annoyed, and 'pissed' means drunk. (I'm in the UK). In fact, I believe the term came from Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. "Her head was full of piss", so we also call people who get regularly drunk piss heads.

I'd say piss was in the top five swear words in the UK.

Right, I'm going to stop saying piss now before I piss someone off!
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 11, 2014, 02:50:12 PM
Eric, all the same meanings here in Oz too mate.  :D

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 11, 2014, 02:53:57 PM
I use the word regularly, but I must admit to bein' a bit shocked to hear it in
'The Goonies' movie when it first came out. My two little-uns didn't bat an eyelid (luckily). B
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: heidi52 on February 11, 2014, 03:59:05 PM
We use pissed off and pissed on. And just pissed for drunk.

But I hadn't heard 'taking the piss' until I came here. We say pulling his/her leg. (Having someone on.)

I'm still not sure how you go from peeing to ribbing, but there must be some connection I'm missing.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Chizzy on February 11, 2014, 04:43:41 PM
When I was in school (in Florida) we called trousers that were a bit short "high waters" (for the same flood reason)

At school in my part of Scotland, if your mum had taken the hem up on your trousers a bit too high (basically so your socks were showing when you were standing up), these would be referred to as "cat dies", insinuating that the wearer's cat had passed away and as a mark of respect, the trousers were being worn at half-mast.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 11, 2014, 04:55:48 PM
 ;D@Chizz.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on February 16, 2014, 02:16:44 PM
At school in my part of Scotland, if your mum had taken the hem up on your trousers a bit too high (basically so your socks were showing when you were standing up), these would be referred to as "cat dies", insinuating that the wearer's cat had passed away and as a mark of respect, the trousers were being worn at half-mast.

I've heard a lot of the Canadians around here use the term "floods" for the same thing :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: cmb on February 16, 2014, 05:16:33 PM
We use pissed off and pissed on. And just pissed for drunk.

But I hadn't heard 'taking the piss' until I came here. We say pulling his/her leg. (Having someone on.)

I'm still not sure how you go from peeing to ribbing, but there must be some connection I'm missing.

Piss is a lovely word. It's so versatile.

You can get pissed. Or pissed off. Or even both at the same time. You can take the piss, or take a piss. And then there's the infamous pisshead, of course.

You can piss away a fortune, be on the piss, or piss all over something. Piece of piss, really.  ;D

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 16, 2014, 05:27:04 PM
'little-miss-piss-the-bed,' is another. I think you can get the meaning. B
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: cmb on February 16, 2014, 05:31:55 PM
'little-miss-piss-the-bed,' is another. I think you can get the meaning. B

 ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: heidi52 on February 16, 2014, 05:32:46 PM
Better to be pissed off than pissed on.  ::)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 16, 2014, 05:33:25 PM
I agree. Very true. B
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Mastafrank on February 19, 2014, 04:09:53 PM
Root Beer is a soft drink, soda or pop - depending on your local. When poured in a glass or mug, you get a nice foamy head on it.

On a hot summer day, a Root Beer Float is something to be treasured.  :)


I LOVE RB FLOATS :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 19, 2014, 06:35:27 PM
In Oz, they are called spiders.  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: ericthehalfabee on February 20, 2014, 04:29:42 AM
We have a medicinal cream over here called Germolene which smells just like root beer. Hence most Brits don't like root beer!
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: thatollie on February 20, 2014, 05:22:29 AM
We have a medicinal cream over here called Germolene which smells just like root beer. Hence most Brits don't like root beer!

Here's something I can agree with. That stuff is rank.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Andrewf on February 20, 2014, 04:51:22 PM
I like American root beer...  but then I also like Wintergreen flavour sweets, and they really smell like Germoline.   :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 20, 2014, 04:57:25 PM
Root beer over here is called ginger beer. No one would know what a root beer was
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Andrewf on February 20, 2014, 05:08:45 PM
Root beer and Ginger beer are completely different.   ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 20, 2014, 05:10:29 PM
 :o :o

Get outa town!!

I thought they were the same, what's the difference mate?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Andrewf on February 20, 2014, 05:14:11 PM
Well...  Ginger beer is made with ginger...   and Root beer, isn't   :D ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 20, 2014, 05:15:12 PM
I thought RB was made of sasparella? I think the 'ginger' in 'Ginger-Beer,' may be a clue for what's in it?  ::)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 20, 2014, 05:16:01 PM
'great minds,' and all that, Andrew.  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 20, 2014, 05:18:26 PM
Ginger beer is a culture and I thought root beer was too.

http://www.forgreenies.com/how-to-make-old-fashioned-ginger-beer

What does it taste like then?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Andrewf on February 20, 2014, 05:22:39 PM
root beer isn't beer... it's a fizzy soda pop drink...  and it tastes like root beer  :P

it's a unique taste. just the same that Dr Pepper is a unique taste too.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 20, 2014, 05:24:54 PM
Ginger beer isn't beer either, its a soda as well. You can to an alcoholic version.

Sorry so many questions, I really thought they were the same  :D

You used to  make a ginger beer plant as below:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ginger_beer
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: thatollie on February 20, 2014, 05:30:13 PM
Ginger beer is alright, ginger ale is better.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 20, 2014, 05:34:05 PM
See? 'GB,' is a GB product.  ;D Ginger Beer used to come in an earthen jug, two toned in colour. Dark brown on the bottom half and creamy-brown on the top. Usually it had a cork stopper. My Grandad would heft the bottle up and swing it over so the weight of it rested on his arm, then he'd chug away at it. Greedy owld git!  ;D It was that strong though, only the hardiest of North Eastern men could drink it. You don't get either, these days it seems?  :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on February 20, 2014, 05:34:55 PM
Root beer over here is called ginger beer. No one would know what a root beer was

I beg to differ, Fly. Root beer is disgusting, and an entirely different product than ginger beer!

To me root beer always tasted like a liquid version of the glue on the back of envelopes. Ginger ale is ok - but if you're talking homemade ginger beer, that's even better  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 20, 2014, 05:37:58 PM
 :D :D :D

I guess I am not tempted to try now Sunny.

Ginger beer is the only soda/soft drink I have.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Suemcb on February 20, 2014, 06:20:17 PM
Just read this thread - watch out FF. Don't know where I've been tho'.

So...
Togs = bathers, swimmers
Crook = sick, told my grandma she was crook when I was five she thought I meant she was a thief.
Packing a sickie + taking a day off work by telling the boss you are ill when you are not.
Jandels = Thongs, flipflops.
Fizz = softdrink

Man those damn Aussies need to learn to speak proper!
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 20, 2014, 06:24:59 PM
 :D :D

Sue I remember the first Kiwi I met, with that super weird accent and talking about his jandels, I thought he was on something  ::)

We chuck sickies  ::)

The rest are similars but different areas here call soda cordial, we always called it soft drink or a glass of fizzy.

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on February 20, 2014, 10:06:16 PM
Ahh ... chuckin' a sickie  ;D I used to try that every time the school sports carnival came up  ::)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 21, 2014, 12:53:37 AM
 :D :D :D

I wagged school only once in my life and got caught.  ???
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Neghe on February 21, 2014, 12:59:50 AM
I beg to differ, Fly. Root beer is disgusting, and an entirely different product than ginger beer!

To me root beer always tasted like a liquid version of the glue on the back of envelopes. Ginger ale is ok - but if you're talking homemade ginger beer, that's even better  ;D

What...? you don't like root beer floats?

...you can make ginger ale floats as well.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Neghe on February 21, 2014, 01:01:20 AM
:D :D :D

I wagged school only once in my life and got caught.  ???

We call that skipping (or cutting) school round here.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 21, 2014, 02:33:21 AM
What...? you don't like root beer floats?

...you can make ginger ale floats as well.

Ginger beer spiders are to die for.  ::)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Neghe on February 21, 2014, 02:40:17 AM
Ginger beer spiders are to die for.  ::)

Oooo...sounds ghastly. What are they?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 21, 2014, 03:04:37 AM
Ice cream in a tall glass with ginger beer poured over, yummo  :D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: JewelAS53 on February 21, 2014, 03:31:53 AM
neither shaken not stirred - that causes a huge mess  :o
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 21, 2014, 04:54:37 AM
 :D :D

A lot of slurping and nose bubbles.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Jo Bannister on February 21, 2014, 09:56:25 AM
Round here, Neghe, we call it mitching school.  At least, we did last time I was in one.  There was a lot of kicking and screaming involved.

Round here, incidentally, is Northern Ireland.  Which brings me to something I've been wondering.  Would it be a good idea if people's tag-lines included a rough idea of where they were?  I've worked it out for some of you, but obviously got it wrong for others.  It would be nice to be able to check by glancing left.  What do you think - any wheels on the cart?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Annmarie on February 21, 2014, 10:06:21 AM
Where am I, Jo?  ;D Don't peak in my profile...
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Neghe on February 21, 2014, 12:33:48 PM
Ice cream in a tall glass with ginger beer poured over, yummo  :D

Oh. We call them "Floats" as in a Root Beer Float, or Ginger Ale Float, or whatever.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Neghe on February 21, 2014, 12:41:15 PM
Round here, Neghe, we call it mitching school.  At least, we did last time I was in one.  There was a lot of kicking and screaming involved.

Round here, incidentally, is Northern Ireland.  Which brings me to something I've been wondering.  Would it be a good idea if people's tag-lines included a rough idea of where they were?  I've worked it out for some of you, but obviously got it wrong for others.  It would be nice to be able to check by glancing left.  What do you think - any wheels on the cart?

I forgot an older one: ditching school. Or ditching someone--as in everyone piling into a car and heading for the beach without him.

And I think it'd be cool to know where everyone is lurking.   ;D

 
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 21, 2014, 02:07:42 PM
In Sunderland we'd call it 'dolling off.' In nearby South Shields we'd call it 'nicking off.' Either way, whatever it's called, I did it regularly. I was lucky though. Dad didn't write good (he was Polish and could only just write his name) so he'd dictate to me and I'd write any official letters. So of course, I copied his signature a lot. And wrote letters of absence, from 'him' to the school. I was very 'poorly' in those days. In fact, in the last six months before I left school for good, I had already unofficially left. But forgot to tell them. I'm not proud of my errant behaviour. Well . . . ok, I am.  ;D   
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: thatollie on February 22, 2014, 01:17:51 AM
Hell, I called it ditching too and I'm supposed to be young.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: CorneliusPoe on February 22, 2014, 10:25:35 AM
In Sunderland we'd call it 'dolling off.' In nearby South Shields we'd call it 'nicking off.' ...  

Those are great. We called it 'ditching' as well and some times simply 'cutting classes'.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 22, 2014, 12:10:00 PM
Our 'free periods' became free-er.  ;D

With regard to the RB floats. My Ma used to make a 'Knickerbocker Glory.'
It consisted of a long tall glass three quarter filled with Cream Soda soft drink (we called it 'pop.') Then a good dollop of Vanilla Ice-Cream. She'd put a straw in it and a spoon. She'd make my girls one each and say to me, "D'you want a coffee?" I'd look at the girls hungrily tucking into their Knicker-bockers and look upto ma and say, "Bugger the coffee! I want a Knicker-Bocker as well." I loved her smile at this. Thanks for a great MJ=memory jogger. Bri.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 22, 2014, 07:40:26 PM
 :D :D

I like that name Bri

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 22, 2014, 07:43:36 PM
 ;D me too. xbx
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Jo Bannister on February 23, 2014, 04:24:44 AM
Sorry, Annmarie, no idea...so I'm going to guess.  A small gasthus in the foothills of the Tyrollean Alps.  Or possibly Bognor Regis.  If I can work out how, I'm going to add a line in my tag, see who follows suit.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Annmarie on February 23, 2014, 09:51:57 AM
Bognor Regis? Um... close. I think.  :)

Have changed my siggy.  :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Jo Bannister on February 23, 2014, 11:49:29 AM
Close, but no coconut! 
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: 510bhan on February 23, 2014, 11:56:19 AM
Good call Jo.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Markopolo on February 23, 2014, 12:07:47 PM
Bri in Glasgow we called it a floater. It consisted of a can on "ginger" which the name we gave to cola or some other fizzy juice poured into a pint glass, and a dollop of ice cream.

A definite favourite of mine as a child.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on February 23, 2014, 12:20:28 PM
Made with Limeade we called it a Green Devil.

Magic drink on a hot day
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 23, 2014, 12:22:35 PM
I had a ginger beer spider yesterday but with chocolate ice cream,  yummo  ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 23, 2014, 12:22:42 PM
When I first came to mwc, gyp. Didn't you have a post about when you were on walkabout, having a limeade in a bar and you met someone you knew?
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on February 23, 2014, 01:27:30 PM
When I first came to mwc, gyp. Didn't you have a post about when you were on walkabout, having a limeade in a bar and you met someone you knew?

Yes.  Met up with Mum and Sis unexpectedly on the front at Lyme Regis.  I was heading back home and they were heading out for a few days.

I was walking by and they were in the cool.

Care-free days ;-)

Gyppo

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: ericthehalfabee on February 24, 2014, 10:42:46 AM
I only found out recently that nearly every country (and even regions) have their own nickname for Woodlice. We call them "Parsons pigs" here. We were talking to someone from England about them and they didn't have a clue what we were talking about. I honestly thought everyone called them that, but it turms out it's just our little island in the middle of the Irish Sea!

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on February 24, 2014, 12:31:09 PM
Eric, I had to google "woodlice" to figure out what you were talking about.

Imagine my surprise to find it is what we (Texas maybe all over the US) call Pill bugs. Also known as Rollie Pollies  due to the fact that can roll themselves into little balls.

 ;D
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: bri h on February 24, 2014, 04:38:11 PM
Ha ha. You mean a 'woodlouse?' Or 'Ear-wig?' as we'd call it.

When Jen(#1 dawter) was a little-un, she loved digging around in the garden, bringing in little 'treasures' so we could admire them. Pretty stones, flowers, and even a teeny tiny bit of glass. Where she found it we never found out? But one day she came belting in, saying "Mam! Mam, look what I found, she held out her grubby mitt. "It's a beautiful Pearl." It was an ear-wig rolled up for its own protection. She stood, fascinated, peering at her 'pearl.' We had to tell her though, we couldn't have her bringing more of them into the house.
"Jen, it's an ear-wig."
She stood now transfixed, with a little rictus smile on her face. I could hear her teeth grinding at the thought of what she held. After a few moments, in a quiet but forthright voice, she said, "Get it off iz!" She still didn't move. She was so tense. When it was gone, she said, "Ahm goin' tuh the batroom tuh get weshed." ha ha. She still remembers this tale. I think it left a print on her memory. Aww, Bless. B
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 24, 2014, 04:58:11 PM
 :D :D

Just googled as well, we call them slaters over here.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Suemcb on February 24, 2014, 05:37:43 PM
Slaters and earwigs are different insects completely.(http://) slater

(http://) earwig
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Suemcb on February 24, 2014, 05:38:36 PM
Sorry slater picture didn't show.

(http://)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Alice, a Country Gal on February 24, 2014, 06:23:08 PM
Earwig:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earwig

Roly polies:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armadillidiidae

Officially - Armadillidiidae; also called, pill bugs and roly polies

Different from the Earwig other than the fact they are all insects.  :)
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Gyppo on February 24, 2014, 08:06:48 PM
Chisel pigs when I was a wee nipper in The New Forest.

When we moved to civilisation so I could start school I met other kids who called them slaters.

Gyppo
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: irallan on February 24, 2014, 08:21:04 PM
Here in West Oz the slater is also known as the potato bug..I think...my cousin even after 30 years here in Oz (she be Scottish) calls the earwig a forky taily..
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on February 24, 2014, 09:35:05 PM
Here in Canada we call them potato bugs too actually… but I do remember calling them 'slaters' when I was a kid growing up in Oz.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: irallan on February 24, 2014, 11:10:30 PM
What part of Oz are you from Distant Sun? I live in the lower great Southern of WA close to Albany. Lived in Windsor NSW for 9 years as well as Derby/ Broome for a while. Grew up in the Sheep Wheatbelt area near Katanning.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Neghe on February 26, 2014, 06:47:30 PM
Here in Canada we call them potato bugs too actually… but I do remember calling them 'slaters' when I was a kid growing up in Oz.

Oh No, no. Potato bugs are these god-awful ugly things:
(https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTKc8l5T72gsEmXr3BnQUHFlfuV0-XEekvYvOyBKdqa1MBBqV6q)

They are Jerusalem crickets...eck. 

(https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSuXF9pn2Kh3xMunuL-0r6V0AO6rbHuzn3tI8NoneY50VxDH4VN)

These are pill bugs or, rolly polly bugs.

And these are earwigs.
(https://encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcQPp-ORAcOsMAjnjna_x7y3oIXFSmCJh2b4dB-v6FRj4gVDa_4kJw)

They supposedly crawl up your ear and lay eggs.

 
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: DistantSun on February 26, 2014, 08:02:54 PM
I'm from Sydney  ;D

Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: fire-fly on February 27, 2014, 05:22:01 PM
Now heres one that really rattled me today.

Its winters last day here in Oz so autumn is here tomorrow for us.

Frank says his spring isn't for 3 weeks.  :o

I thought we were all just opposite, not different dates to boot.

So how do your seasons work?

Ours go off the 1st of the month to the last of the month for each season.
Title: Re: How Do You Say It?
Post by: Neghe on February 27, 2014, 05:48:28 PM
Now heres one that really rattled me today.

Its winters last day here in Oz so autumn is here tomorrow for us.

Frank says his spring isn't for 3 weeks.  :o

I thought we were all just opposite, not different dates to boot.

So how do your seasons work?

Ours go off the 1st of the month to the last of the month for each season.

Don't you mean it's Summer's last days...?

Many places have longer winters than others. It seems like where you are in Oz you have slightly longer fall and spring times. In this part of Cali, we have a bit longer summers and sometimes the fall is fairly warm--though, the nights in fall are a lot colder than the summer nights. In fact, late summer through the the end of fall is a great time to visit anywhere in the western US.